The Lucketts of Portobacco

Title:The Lucketts of Portobacco; a genealogical history of Samuel Luckett, gent., of Port Tobacco, Charles county, Maryland, and some of his descendants, with a sketch of the allied family of Offutt, of Prince George county, Maryland
Author:Harry Wright Newman
Publication date:1938
Publisher:Harry Wright Newman
Digitizing sponsor:Internet Archive
Contributor:Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center
RepositoryInternet Archive

In the absence of facts regarding the emigrant ancestor, one must examine known truths of his life and thus make deductions accordingly. Samuel Luckett, the Maryland progenitor, failed to apply for his 50 acres of land which were due each and every settler upon his declared intentions to inhabit permanently in Maryland. In the absence of this instrument one does not know whether he emigrated and thus paid for his own passage, or whether he was brought into Maryland by another party. The former is believed to be the circumstances, for usually those who transported settlers and servants were most anxious to acclaim their rights to the 50 acres.

The very first evidence of his being in Maryland was during the fall of 1678 when he received 30 pounds of tobacco for his participation in the Nanticoke Indian War. This fact is rather significant, because it proves that he served in the ranks and inasmuch as the war was not one in which all man power was conscripted, it is concluded that he was young and therefore not more than thirty years of age at that time. Consequently, it is estimated that his birth occurred around the year 1650.

Six years later, March 1684, he witnessed the will of his neighbor, Colonel William Chandler, an early and wealthy planter of Port Tobacco, who had migrated from Virginia. In August of the same year he purchased from William Smoot, of the Wicomico, for 5,000 pounds of tobacco the tract “Johnson’s Royke”, formerly laid out for George Goodrick.

And in the year 1684 Samuel Luckett married a young and affluent widow. From the foregoing facts, there is nothing to discredit the theory that he was bom before 1650, and it is highly possible that his birth occurred even sometime after that year. However, 1650 is a fair estimate.

Studying the names of his children, one may derive other conclusions. His four sons were William, Samuel, Thomas Hussey, and Thomas.

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2 thoughts on “The Lucketts of Portobacco”

  1. Very interesting but noticed above the name Le Masters is missing though Abe and his family was one of the very first Settlers there from France……before 1680

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