Lewis

Slave Narrative of Perry Lewis

Interviewer: Rogers Person Interviewed: Perry Lewis Location: Baltimore, Maryland Place of Birth: Kent Island, MD Age: 86 Place of Residence: 1124 E. Lexington St., Baltimore, Maryland Reference: Personal interview with Perry Lewis, ex-slave, at his home, 1124 E. Lexington St., Baltimore. “I was born on Kent Island, Md. about 86 years ago. My father’s name …

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Hutchinson Family of Norwich Vermont

Hutchinson is an old and numerous family in Norwich, as well as in other parts of the country. They were among the early settlers of Massachusetts and were in Lynn and Salem in that colony as early as 1628, or 1629. A descendant of these early colonists, named Abijah, who was a tailor, removed from …

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Biographical Sketch of Robert Ellsworth Lewis

Lewis, Robert Ellsworth; gen. sec’y Y. M. C. A.; born, Berkshire, Vermont, Sept. 28, 1869; son of C. P. V. and Ellen E. Haynes Lewis; University of Vermont, class of 1892, degrees Ph. D., M. A., L. H. D.; married, Brookline, Massachusetts, Aug. 24, 1893, Grace Mason Brackett (Wellesley, 1890); issue, five sons, three daughters; …

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Captivity and Redemption of Mrs. Jemima Howe – Indian Captivities

A particular account of the captivity and redemption of Mrs. Jemima Howe, who was taken prisoner by the Indians at Hinsdale, New Hampshire, on the twenty-seventh of July, 1765, as communicated to Dr. Belknap by the Rev. Bunker Gay. As Messrs. Caleb Howe, Hilkiah Grout, and Benjamin Gaffield, who had been hoeing corn in the …

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K. Lewis

Eng. 1st Class (Navy). Born in Carteret County Jan., 1895; son of Jos. B. and Mrs. Mary Lewis. Husband of Mrs. Mildred Hetzel Lewis. Entered service January, 1915, at Morehead City, N.C. Sent to Norfolk, Va. Promoted to 2nd Class Fireman. Promoted to rank of 1st Class Fireman, then to 1st Class Eng. Served on …

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Beal Genealogy of Abington Massachusetts

The Beal family of Abington, the head of which was the late George A. Beal, Esq., who for years was one of the leading men of the town, prominent in business and public affairs and useful and substantial in citizenship, is one of long and honorable standing in this section of the Commonwealth and is a branch of the earlier Weymouth family, where early appeared the immigrant settler. By the marriage of the late Mr. Beal into the Reed family, his posterity is doubly descended from the Puritan stock of the early Colonial period of Massachusetts. There follows in chronological order from the immigrant settler, John Beal, the genealogy of the particular Abington family of Beals alluded to.

Slave Narrative of Thomas Lewis

Interviewer: Estella R. Dodson Person Interviewed: Thomas Lewis Location: North Summit Street, Bloomington, Indiana Place of Birth: Spencer County, Kentucky Date of Birth: 1857 Submitted by: Estella R. Dodson District #11 Monroe County Bloomington, Ind. October 4, 1937 INTERVIEW WITH THOMAS LEWIS, COLORED North Summit Street, Bloomington, Ind. I was born in Spencer County, Kentucky, …

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American Literary, Scientific, and Military Academy

Among the well known educational institutions in our land during the early part of the past century, was the American Literary, Scientific, and Military Academy, the forerunner of Norwich University, founded by the late Capt. Alden Partridge in 1819, in Norwich, his native town. The corner-stone of the Academy building was placed August 4, 1819, …

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Narrative of the Sufferings of Peter Williamson – Indian Captivities

Not for the faint of heart or stomach, this is a graphically descriptive recounting of the captivity of Peter Williamson, who was taken by the Delaware Indians, at his own house near the forks of the Delaware in Pennsylvania. Of all the sufferings reported by captives, this particular account appears to go above and beyond the usual descriptions, almost to the point of unbelievability – because in this case, he doesn’t simply report the acts of cruelty, but vividly describes them in the most horrid fashion, even to claim the Delaware committed cannibalism on one of their captives, and then explaining how they did it.

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