Harris

The Wilson Family, Somerset and Barter Hill Branch

In the preparation of “The Wilson family, Somerset and Barter Hill branch” I have discovered two lists of the names of the sons and daughters of Col. Ben and Ann Seay Wilson of “Somerset” in Cumberland County, Virginia, in addition to the list found in my father’s notes. None of these was arranged in the same chronological order. It was my good fortune in 1915 to find the Bible, claimed to be the Bible of Col. Ben and Ann Seay Wilson of “Somerset” in Cumberland County, Virginia. At that time this was in the hands of Miss Clementine Reid Wilson, Col. Ben’s great-granddaughter, and it was my privilege to copy, with the aid of a reading glass, for the ink was badly faded, the names of their children from that Bible in the same chronological order in which they were recorded. This chronological order, and military records found, support each other. I therefore believe that this sketch contains the most accurate chronological list of Col. Ben’s and Ann Seay Wilson’s children to be found outside of his Bible.

The Lucketts of Portobacco

A genealogical history of Samuel Luckett, Gent, of Port Tobacco, Charles County, Maryland, and some of his descendants, with a sketch of the allied family of Ofifutt, of Prince Georges County, Maryland.

Adams, Adderton, Addison, Alexander, Applebaugh, Ashby, Atkisson, Baggett, Bainbridge, Baldwin, Barnes, Barney, Bartlett, Battle, Beale, Beall, Beatty, Beaven, Belt, Benson, Bethel, Blair, Borden, Bottrell, Bowie, Bradford, Brazier, Brengle, Briscoe, Brocke, Brogdon, Brown, Bryan, Burgess, Campbell, Cantwell, Carr, Carroll, Cave, Chiswell, Clapman, Clements, Clephane, Contee, Cooke, Cooper, Cope, Cox, Creek, Cumming, Dade, Davis, Delahay, Dent, Doling, Dorry, Dorsey, Douglas, Drone, Duval, Eagler, Earle, Edelen, Edmonston, Elms, Evans, Fendall, Ferguson, Field, Fink, Floyd, Fouch, Franklin, Galford, Gladden, Glahn, Glenn, Godfrey, Goodrick, Gracey, Graham, Gray, Green, Griffin, Gulick, Haddox, Hall, Hamill, Hamilton, Hanson, Harding, Harris, Harrison, Harrold, Hawkins, Haynie, Hobbs, Hobson, Holton, Hussey, Jamieson, Jenifer, Jenkins, Jett, Johnson, Jones, Jordan, Kalbfleisch, Keith, Kennedy, Kenner, Kerrick, Kybert, Langworth, Lawson, Lennarts, Lewis, Lilley, Lowe, Luckett, Lynn, Maddox, Magruder, Mantz, Manzy, Markham, Marlow, Martin, Marye, Mastin, Matthews, McCane, McCauley, Metcalf, Middleton, Miller, Minor, Mooney, Moore, Morehead, Morris, Mudd, Muir, Murray, Neale, Nelson, Nesbit, Nichnow, Nichollas, Odom, Offord, Offutt, Oldham, ORea, Orrell, Parker, Parnell, Patton, Payne, Perry, Peters, Peyton, Posey, Price, Ramsey, Rankin, Rasbury, Ratliff, Reed, Robey, Robinson, Roxborough, Sage, Sargeant, Sayles, Scott, Sewell, Seydel, Shaw, Shrive, Sidener, Skinner, Smith, Smoot, Sprigg, Spriplin, Steel, Stone, Sugar, Swansted, Swearingen, Taylor, Theobald, Thickpenny, Thompson, Tolson, Tongue, Trundle, Tyler, Venom, Wall, Wallace, Ware, Watkins, West, Westman, Wheadon, Wheeler, White, Whiting, Wickliff, Willcoxen, Williams, Withers, Witt, Wood, Woods, Woodward, Yates, Yost.

Exclusively yours, Eurilla

Written by Edna Dooling Herrin for her daughter Eurilla, this self-published manuscript intent was to instruct Eurilla on her ancestry, especially in the settling of Madison County, Illinois. Families mentioned: Barber, Culp, Dooling, Harris, Herrin, Judy, Pearce, Rhodes, and Walsh.

Weymouth ways and Weymouth people

Edward Hunt’s “Weymouth ways and Weymouth people: Reminiscences” takes the reader back in Weymouth Massachusetts past to the 1830s through the 1880s as he provides glimpses into the people of the community. These reminiscences were mostly printed in the Weymouth Gazette and provide a fair example of early New England village life as it occurred in the mid 1800s. Of specific interest to the genealogist will be the Hunt material scattered throughout, but most specifically 286-295, and of course, those lucky enough to have had somebody “remembered” by Edward.

A Genealogy of the Lake Family

A genealogy of the Lake family of Great Egg Harbour in Old Gloucester County in New Jersey : descended from John Lade of Gravesend, Long Island; with notes on the Gravesend and Staten Island branches of the family. This volume of nearly 400 pages includes a coat-of-arms in colors, two charts, and nearly fifty full page illustrations – portraits, old homes, samplers, etc. The coat-of-arms shown in the frontspiece is an unusually good example of the heraldic art!

Ancestry of Loyed Ellis Chamberlain of Brockton, Massachusetts

Conspicuous on the roll of the representative lawyers of southeastern Massachusetts appears the name of Loyed Ellis Chamberlain. In no profession is there a career more open to men of talent than in that of the law, and in no field of endeavor is there demanded a more careful preparation, a more perfect appreciation of …

Ancestry of Loyed Ellis Chamberlain of Brockton, Massachusetts Read More »

Kingman Genealogy of Middleboro Massachusetts

The Middleboro family bearing this name is a branch of the Bridgewater family and it of the earlier Weymouth Kingman family, the American ancestor of which is credited with coming from Wales. This article pertains to some of the descendants of the late Maj. Bela Kingman, whose father, Abner Kingman, and family came from Bridgewater to Middleboro during the closing years of the Revolution, and here for generations the family has played well its part in the affairs of Middleboro, notably the Major’s son, Calvin D. Kingman, Esq., and the latter’s sons, Charles W. and Philip E. Kingman, who for years together and in turn developed and carried on a large shoe industry, giving employment to hundreds of hands.

Descendants of Elder Nutter of Dover, MA

The family bearing this name in East Bridgewater, whose head was the late Hon. Isaac Newton Nutter, descends from an ancient and honorable family of early New Hampshire, and is connected by marriage in later generations with a number of the old and highly respected families of Plymouth Colony, among them descendants of the “Mayflower” Pilgrims. The emigrant ancestor,

Elder Hatevil Nutter, was born in England in 1603. He was one of those of good estate and of “some account for religion” who were induced to leave England with Captain Wiggins in 1633, and to found a town in New England on Dover Neck, in New Hampshire. His wife, Annie, and son, Anthony, accompanied him. He received several grants of land, and became a large holder of real estate. He was a ruling elder in the first church at Dover, and sometimes filled its pulpit. He filled various offices in church and state, was highly respectable, and possessed of a good share of this world’s goods. He died before June 28, 1675 (when his will was proved), at the age of seventy-one years, leaving a “present wife, Ann,” and three children.

Some Descendants of Lawrence Wilkinson of Providence, RI

Lawrence Wilkinson, the first of the race here in New England, was born in Lanchester, County of Durham, England, a son of William Wilkinson by his wife Mary, sister of Sir John Conyers, Bart., and the grandson of Lawrence Wilkinson, of Harpley House, Durham. He was a loyalist, and at the surrender of Newcastle, 1644, was taken prisoner by the Parliamentary and Scotch troops. At this time he held a lieutenant’s commission. He was deprived of his property, and his estates sequestered by order of Parliament. After having obtained special permission from Lord Fairfax, chief commander of the Parliamentary army, he embarked with his wife and child for New England, leaving, according to Somerby, in 1652. Arriving at Providence he signed the civil compact and received a gift of twenty-five acres of land and commenced his pioneer life. He was admitted as one of the original “Proprietors of Providence.” He soon acquired a large real estate, and held a prominent position among his fellow citizens. He was frequently chosen to fill offices of trust in the infant colony; was elected a member of the Legislature in 1659 and subsequently. He was an active business man. He participated in the Indian wars. He lived in his adopted country nearly half a century. His death occurred in 1692.

Hawes Family of Wrentham, MA

For generations, since the early Colonial period, the Hawes family has been resident in Wrentham, Mass. The line is traced back to Edward Hawes, of Dedham, Mass., born probably about 1620, who died in 1686. He married April 15, 1648, Eliony Lombard. This genealogy discusses the line from Edward through Oliver Snow Hawes who removed to Fall River Mass. It then discusses the family and descendants of Olvier Snow Hawes who resided in the vicinity of Fall River.

Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

Charlton Massachusetts Warnings 1737-1788

In the following information all the names, dates and other essential particulars which appear in the returns to the Court in the County of Worcester during the entire period – a full half-century, from 1737 to 1788 – in which these entries were made, are given. The returns from each place have been brought together and arranged under the name of the town or district, in this case Charlton Massachusetts.

Bolton Massachusetts Warnings 1737-1788

In the following information all the names, dates and other essential particulars which appear in the returns to the Court in the County of Worcester during the entire period – a full half-century, from 1737 to 1788 – in which these entries were made, are given. The returns from each place have been brought together and arranged under the name of the town or district, in this case Bolton Massachusetts.

Lowell Massachusetts Genealogy

Tracing ancestors in Lowell, Massachusetts online and for free has been greatly enhanced by the University of Massachusetts in Lowell which provided digitized version of a large quantity of the Lowell public records. Combined with the cemetery and census records available freely online, you should be able to easily trace your ancestors from the founding of Lowell in 1826 through 1940, the last year of available census records. To add color to the otherwise basic facts of your ancestors existence we provide free access to a wide range of manuscripts on the history of Lowell, it’s manufactures and residents.

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