Marlow

The Lucketts of Portobacco

A genealogical history of Samuel Luckett, Gent, of Port Tobacco, Charles County, Maryland, and some of his descendants, with a sketch of the allied family of Ofifutt, of Prince Georges County, Maryland.

Adams, Adderton, Addison, Alexander, Applebaugh, Ashby, Atkisson, Baggett, Bainbridge, Baldwin, Barnes, Barney, Bartlett, Battle, Beale, Beall, Beatty, Beaven, Belt, Benson, Bethel, Blair, Borden, Bottrell, Bowie, Bradford, Brazier, Brengle, Briscoe, Brocke, Brogdon, Brown, Bryan, Burgess, Campbell, Cantwell, Carr, Carroll, Cave, Chiswell, Clapman, Clements, Clephane, Contee, Cooke, Cooper, Cope, Cox, Creek, Cumming, Dade, Davis, Delahay, Dent, Doling, Dorry, Dorsey, Douglas, Drone, Duval, Eagler, Earle, Edelen, Edmonston, Elms, Evans, Fendall, Ferguson, Field, Fink, Floyd, Fouch, Franklin, Galford, Gladden, Glahn, Glenn, Godfrey, Goodrick, Gracey, Graham, Gray, Green, Griffin, Gulick, Haddox, Hall, Hamill, Hamilton, Hanson, Harding, Harris, Harrison, Harrold, Hawkins, Haynie, Hobbs, Hobson, Holton, Hussey, Jamieson, Jenifer, Jenkins, Jett, Johnson, Jones, Jordan, Kalbfleisch, Keith, Kennedy, Kenner, Kerrick, Kybert, Langworth, Lawson, Lennarts, Lewis, Lilley, Lowe, Luckett, Lynn, Maddox, Magruder, Mantz, Manzy, Markham, Marlow, Martin, Marye, Mastin, Matthews, McCane, McCauley, Metcalf, Middleton, Miller, Minor, Mooney, Moore, Morehead, Morris, Mudd, Muir, Murray, Neale, Nelson, Nesbit, Nichnow, Nichollas, Odom, Offord, Offutt, Oldham, ORea, Orrell, Parker, Parnell, Patton, Payne, Perry, Peters, Peyton, Posey, Price, Ramsey, Rankin, Rasbury, Ratliff, Reed, Robey, Robinson, Roxborough, Sage, Sargeant, Sayles, Scott, Sewell, Seydel, Shaw, Shrive, Sidener, Skinner, Smith, Smoot, Sprigg, Spriplin, Steel, Stone, Sugar, Swansted, Swearingen, Taylor, Theobald, Thickpenny, Thompson, Tolson, Tongue, Trundle, Tyler, Venom, Wall, Wallace, Ware, Watkins, West, Westman, Wheadon, Wheeler, White, Whiting, Wickliff, Willcoxen, Williams, Withers, Witt, Wood, Woods, Woodward, Yates, Yost.

Canton Asylum, 1910, List of Patients

In 1898, Congress passed a bill creating the only ‘Institution for Insane Indians’ in the United States. The Canton Indian Insane Asylum, South Dakota (sometimes called Hiawatha Insane Asylum) opened for the reception of patients in January, 1903. Many of the inmates were not mentally ill. Native Americans risked being confined in the asylum for …

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