Arkansas Genealogy – Free Arkansas Genealogy

This Arkansas genealogypage of our website provides direct links to major databases and historical titles and information found on Arkansas genealogy and history, whether they exist on our site, or across the web.

Arkansas African American Records

  • Arkansas African American Records
    • WPA Slave Narratives
      Slave narratives are stories of surviving slaves told in their own words and ways. Unique, colorful, and authentic, these slave narratives provide a look at the culture of the South during slavery which heretofore had not been told.

Arkansas Bible Records

Arkansas Biographies

Arkansas Cemetery Records

  • Arkansas Cemetery Records
    Arkansas Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the Arkansas county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we provide only a partial listing.
    • Cemetery census of Arkansas
      Magnolia, Columbia; Conway, Faulkner; London, Pope; West Helena, Phillips; —  Chalybeat Springs,   P e r s o n , Columbia;  BARLOW,   Evenezer,  Frazier,  MT. Vernon,  Westem, Miller,  Salem,  Sharmon,  Sawrna, Oak Grove, Pleasant Hill,  Price, L. 0, 0. F,  Hartford Memorial Park   Cemeteries, etc. FHB

Arkansas Census Records

Arkansas Church Records and History

Arkansas Court Records

Arkansas Directories

Arkansas Genealogy

  • Fathers of the ridge
    Genealogical sketches of Greene County, Arkansas
  • Ancestor charts of the Saline County History and Heritage Society members
    Rowland, Leon; Moore, Orene; Saline County History and Heritage Society (Arkansas)
  • Lineage charts and family group sheets
    submitted by members of Hempstead County Genealogical Society
  • Arkansas pioneers
    Compiled local and family histories from the Clayton Library.
  • A family history : Adcock, John, of Buckingham County, Virginia
    Some of his descendants : with collateral lines: Christian, McMurtry, Robertson, Ingersoll, etc. John Adcock, of Scottish-Irish descent, emigrated from England in late 1600s or early 1700s and settled in Buckingham County, Virginia. His son, Joseph Adcock, served in the American Revolution. He married first, Susan Cason (d. 1804). They had thirteen children, ca. 1754-1804. Joseph and his second wife, migrated to Kanawha County, Virginia (now West Virginia) in 1814. Descendants of his sons, John and Joel, listed, lived in Tennessee, Arkansas, Missouri, Illinois, Georgia, Mississippi, and elsewhere.
  • A history of the Albright family
    Thomas Finley Allbright was born in 1853 near Capps, Arkansas, married Sarah Anne Gilliam at age 24 and died in 1900. Includes Allbright, Albrecht, Moore and allied families.
  • A Berry history
    Record contains an accounty of John and Jane Campbell Berry of Washington County, Virginia and some of their descendants in Virginia, Tennessee, Alabama, Arkansas, Oregon and other states.
  • A biographical sketch of the life, ancestors and descendants of Robert Exum Coffey (1858 – 1939) of Boone County, Arkansas
    Robert Exum Coffey (1858-1939), son of Jonathan Norman Coffey and Permelia Spencer Cloyd, was born in Yardelle, Arkansas. He married Ida Mae Crumpler, daughter of William Crumpler and Mary Ann Cockerham, in 1881.
  • A bit about the past for Calvin, Barbara, and Ruby
    Genealogy for Cotton, Castoe, Pendelton, Batesel, Coots families : from 1068-2008 A.D. John Cotton was born in 1626 and lived in Conington, Huntingdonshire, England. He married Anne Hucheson and they had nine children. He died in Virginia. Ancestors, descendants and relatives lived mainly in England, Virginia, North Carolina, Arkansas, Missouri, Utah, Idaho and California.
  • A Dysart lineage, seven generations
    Information on seven generations of the Dysart family line, beginning with Samuel Dysart of Ireland c. 1746. Continues with the Dysart family coming to the United States and settling in Virginia, Maryland and Kentucky, and later moving west. James Dysart, son of Samuel and Frances Anderson Dysart, ” … was born in 1744 in County, Donegal, Ireland. In 1775 he married Agnes Beattie in Botetourt County, Virginia. He died on May 26, 1818 in Rock Castle County, Kentucky.”–P. 22. Descendants and relatives lived in Virginia, Maryland, Kentucky, Tennessee, Illinois, Missouri, Arkansas, Utah and elsewhere.
  • The first Donahoe families in Fort Smith, Arkansas, 1848
  • The Edmistons of Washington County, Arkansas
    David Edmiston (b.ca.1760) was born in North Carolina, and married Anne Brevard in either North Carolina or Tennessee. They moved in 1818 from Tennessee to Clark County, Arkansas. Descendants and relatives lived in North Carolina, Tennessee, Arkansas and elsewhere.
  • 2000 years, the families of Foster and Mansell
    Stephen Moore Foster, born February 2, 1844 at Dekalb County, Tennessee, son of William Golden Foster and Minerva Spurlock. He married Mary Pearl Patterson and Rebecca Marilza Blythe Pruitt. He died on January 1, 1902 at Roseville, Arkansas.
  • A Gallaher family history : James H. and Sarah E. Gallaher and their descendants
    James Gallaher (ca. 1730-1792) was born in Ireland. He and his wife, Sarah E. Miller, were in the Cumberland Valley in Pennsylvania in 1762. They later settled in Washington County, Tennessee in 1783. Descendants lived in Tennessee, Illinois, Arkansas.
  • A Graham family of Boone County, Arkansas
    Eli Frazier Graham (1839-1916) and wife Narcissus Lucindy Ellen Wadley (1848-1933) with some earlier generations and collateral lineages. Eli Frazier Graham (1839-1916), son of James M. Graham and Mary Robinson, was born in Bolivar, Missouri. He married Narcissus Lucindy Ellen Wadley (1848-1933) in 1866.
  • A Graham genealogy
    William Graham was born in Ulster Province, Ireland, the son of Richard and Nancy Graham. His family immigrated to Pennsylvania when he was young. He later migrated to North Carolina. He married Margaret Graham, daughter of James and Jane Graham of Rowan County, in 1767. They settled in Mecklenburg County, where they had nine sons, 1769- 1790. He was a singner of the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independance in 1775. He died in 1818. His grandson, William Graham (1814-1861) was born at Charlotte, North Carolina, the son of Sam and Abigail Shinn Graham. He migrated to Georgia where he married Louisa B. Dungegan. They had ten children, 1840-1859, all born in Georgia. The family migrated to Pleasant Valley (later Naylor) Arkansas in 1861. He died there. Descendants listed lived in Arkansas, Illinois and elsewhere.
  • A genealogy of the Hammer and Spoon families
    John Hammer immigrated to the U.S. and eventually settled in Randolph County, North Carolina. His descendant, John Hammer, son of Abraham and Catherine Hammer was born in 1814 in North Carolina. He married Jane Spoon in 1832, daughter of John and Sophia. Descendants live in North Carolina, Indiana, Tennessee, Missouri, Arkansas, and elsewhere.
  • A genealogy of all the descendants of Ephriam Knight through John Knight
    James Valentine Knight was a veteran of the War of 1812. He was the son of Ephriam Knight who had migrated from Maryland to Virginia. James married a Miss Kindal in Virginia and they migrated to Ross County, Ohio where their family was reared. Descendants lived in Indiana, Pennsylvania, New York, Missouri, Arkansas and elsewhere.
  • 200 Years of London family in America
    Amos London (1737-1805), a Quaker, served in the Revolutionary Army, and moved from New Jersey to Surry County, North Carolina in 1777. Descendants lived in New Jersey, North Carolina, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona
  • May and Keith families of Arkansas
  • A Genealogy of the McCullah-Wasson families, 1700-1967
    Thomas Robertson (1763-1834) immigrated from Ireland to Virginia in 1780. He married Elizabeth Lane (1771-1838) in 1789 in Amherst County, Tennessee. Their daughter, Lucy married Alexander McCullah in 1819. Descendants lived in Tennessee, Kentucky, Arkansas, Iowa, Missouri and elsewhere.
  • A family history of Luther and Vera Merriman, 1883-2004
    Luther Merriman was born 10 September 1912 in Doniphan, Missouri. His parents were Jess A. Merriman (1883-1942) and Hattie Belle West (1885-1959). He married Vera Beatrice Gregory, daughter of Samuel Afton Gregory (1878-1958) and Rosa Jones Horn (1880-1959), 16 September 1934 in Pelsor, Arkansas. They had three children. Luther died in 1982 in Independence, Missouri.
  • A Brief history of the Pettit and Spruce families in Boone County, Arkansas : ca. 1818-1925
  • The Rhoads family newsletter
    by the Rhoads Cemetery and Family Association,
  • A history and genealogy of the Ruddle family, 1695-1941
    John Ruddell (ca.1695-1781) emigrated from England to Chester County, Pennsylvania about 1717, and married Mary Cook. The family moved to Augusta County, Virginia between 1743 and 1747. Descendants lived in Virginia, Kentucky, Missouri, Arkansas and elsewhere.
  • 13 generations of Sabin families
    Life stories of David Sabin (1807-1882), Elizabeth Dowart (1811-1891); life stories of David Dorwart Sabin (1841-1899), Mary Powell (1843-1929); life stories of David Sabin (1868-1947), Julia Elizabeth Pfiste.
  • A branch of the Stallings/Stillions family tree
    Richard Stallings was born in about 1630 in Lincolnshire, England. He married Lavaria Kingland, daughter of Anthony Kingland. They had seven children. They emigrated in 1652 and settled in Calvert County, Maryland. Descendants and relatives lived mainly in Maryland, Virginia, Missouri and Arkansas.
  • A history of one–of the many–John Williams families in America
    John Williams immigrated from Wales to land near Norfolk, Virginia, served in the Revolutionary War, probably married twice, and moved after the war to North Carolina and then to Madison County, Tennessee. Descendants lived in Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Texas and elsewhere.
  • Kith and kin of Georgia Ridge, Crawford County, Arkansas
    Abel, Adams, Chastain, Ferguson, Rogers, Sinclair, et. al.

Arkansas Genealogy Websites

Arkansas Genealogy

The Original Arkansas Genealogy

ChicotCleburneCraighead, Drew, Faulkner, Greene, Johnson, Lafayette, Lawrence, Lovely, Madison, MississippiPoinsett, St. Francis, Stone, Washington, Yell

ARGenWeb
ARGenWeb is created by a group of volunteers as part of the USGenWeb Project working together to provide free genealogy websites for genealogical research in every county in Arkansas. This Project is non-commercial and fully committed to free genealogy access for everyone.

Arkansas, Ashley, Baxter, Benton, Boone, Bradley, Calhoun, Carroll, Chicot, Clark, Clay, Cleburne, Cleveland, Columbia, Conway, Craighead, Crawford, Crittenden, Cross, Dallas, Desha, Dorsey, Drew, Faulkner, Franklin, Fulton, Garland, Grant, Greene, Hempstead, Hot Spring, Howard, Independence, Izard, Jackson, Jefferson, Johnson, Lafayette, Lawrence, Lee, Lincoln, Little River, Logan, Lonoke, Lovely, Madison, Marion, Miller, Mississippi, Monroe, Montgomery, Nevada, Newton, Ouachita, Perry, Phillips, Pike, Poinsett, Polk, Pope, Prairie, Pulaski, Randolph, St. Francis, Saline, Scott, Searcy, Sebastian, Sevier, Sharp, Stone, Union, Van Buren, Washington, White, Woodruff, Yell

Arkansas History

Arkansas County Histories

Arkansas Town Histories

Arkansas Land Records

Arkansas Maps

Arkansas Military Records

Arkansas Native American Records

Arkansas Newspapers

  • Arkansas County
  • Benton County
    • Gentry Courier Journal 1896-1897
    • Gentry Courier Journal Advance 1897-1949
  • Independence County
  • Mississippi County
    • Leachville
      • World’s cresset 1903-1918
        The World’s Cresset began in 1891 in Aurora Springs, Missouri, as the journalistic brainchild of Leroy Sylvester Garrett. In publicity introducing the new four-page, six-column weekly, Garrett called it “The Aurora Springs Cresset,” but he seemed to decide later to expand the scope of the paper beyond Aurora Springs.
  • Sebastian County
    The following newspapers are hosted by the Fort Smith Library through History Archives interface which doesn’t allow direct linking (aka, it’s poorly designed). In order to access these you’ll need to use the following link: Fort Smith Library Community Archives
    • Arkansas Developer 1894-1894
    • Belle Grove School Journal 1872-1872
    • Daily News Record 1894-1895
    • Daily Southwest American 1911-1911
    • Evening Call 1891-1891
    • Fort Smith Bulletin 1862-1862
    • Fort Smith Daily Herald 1877-1879
    • Fort Smith Daily Time and Herald 1861-1861
    • Fort Smith Elevator 1878-1909
    • Fort Smith Enterprise 1895-1895
    • Fort Smith Herald 1848-1881
    • Fort Smith Herald and New Elevator 1912-1915
    • Fort Smith New Era 1863-1870
    • Fort Smith News Record 1896-1907
    • Fort Smith Southwest American 1908-1911
    • Fort Smith Standard 1867-1867
    • Fort Smith Times Record 1924-1929
    • Fort Smith Tri Weekly Bulletin 1862-1862
    • Fort Smith Tri Weekly Herald 1865-1866
    • Fort Smith Weekly Herald 1867-1879
    • Fort Smith Weekly New Era 1865-1874
    • News Record 1894-1894
    • Ouachita Conference Journal 1863-1863
    • South West Independent 1854-1854
    • Southwest American 1908-1932
    • Southwest Times Record 1923-1932
    • Sun 1898-1898
    • Thirty Fifth Parallel 1860-1861
    • Times Record 2012-2018
    • Tri Weekly Fort Smith Herald 1870-1872
    • War Times 1863-1863
    • Weekly New Era 1880-1884
    • Western Independent 1872-1877
    • Wheelers Daily Independent 1879-1879
    • Wheelers Independent 1878-1883
    • Wheelers Western Independent 1878-1878

Arkansas Newspaper Transcriptions

Arkansas Obituaries

Arkansas Periodicals

Arkansas Research Guides

Arkansas School Records

Arkansas Vital Records

Arkansas Yearbooks

New Arkansas Genealogy?

Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Western Arkansas

Biographical and historical memoirs of western Arkansas, comprising a condensed history of the state, a number of biographies of distinguished citizens of the same, a brief descriptive history of each of the counties mentioned and numerous Biographical Sketches of the Citizens of such Counties: Johnson, Logan, Montgomery, Polk, Pope, Scott and Yell counties. Read or download the book for free.

Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Eastern Arkansas

Biographical and historical memoirs of eastern Arkansas, comprising a condensed history of the state, a number of biographies of distinguished citizens of the same, a brief descriptive history of each of the counties: Arkansas, Crittenden, Cross, Lee, Monroe, Phillips, Prairie, St. Francis, White, and Woodruff counties. Read or download the book for free.

Arkansas Funeral Home Records

This page links to known Arkansas Funeral Records whether they be available online or offline. Funeral records are an invaluable source of genealogical information that can provide insight into the lives and deaths of our ancestors. They offer a wealth of details on the deceased and their family, including their names, ages, dates of death, causes of death, and other key information.

Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty Land Warrants

This article helps you access the Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty Land Warrants for free. Following two simple steps, one to search, and the other to browse the actual microfilms, you can quickly find your ancestors Revolutionary War pension record, or Bounty-Land record and download the images. During 1800-1900 the United States issued more than 80,000 pensions and bounty-land-warrants to soldiers of the Revolutionary War, their spouse, or their children. Was your ancestor one of them?

The Turner Family Magazine

In 1916 and 1917, William Montgomery Clemens edited a series of pamphlets called the Turner Family Magazine. It was meant to be a genealogical, historical and biographical magazine about the Turner family across the United States. That series of magazines was later published in 1920 as a complete bound volume. This is what this book is.

United States Bureau of Land Management Tract Books, 1800-c. 1955

3,907 land management tract books containing official records of the land status and transactions involving surveyed public lands arranged by state and then by township and range. These books indicate who obtained the land, and include a physical description of the tract and where the land is located. The type of transaction is also recorded such as cash entry, credit entry, homesteads, patents (deeds) granted by the Federal Government, and other conveyances of title such as Indian allotments, internal improvement grants (to states), military bounty land warrants, private land claims, railroad grants, school grants, and swamp grants. Additional items of…

ARGenWeb – Arkansas GenWeb

A list linking to the ARGenWeb county websites. ARGenWeb is created by a group of volunteers as part of the USGenWeb Project working together to provide free genealogy websites for genealogical research in every county in Alabama. This Project is non-commercial and fully committed to free genealogy access for everyone.

Chronicling America Historical Newspapers

Chronicling America is a Website providing access to information about historic newspapers and select digitized newspaper pages, and is produced by the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP). NDNP, a partnership between the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the Library of Congress (LC), is a long-term effort to develop an Internet-based, searchable database of U.S. newspapers with descriptive information and select digitization of historic pages. Supported by NEH, this rich digital resource will be developed and permanently maintained at the Library of Congress. An NEH award program will fund the contribution of content from, eventually, all U.S. states and…

Arkansas World War 2 Casualties – Army, Air Force

This database contains War Department casualties (Army and Army Air Force personnel) from World War II for Arkansas. Information provided includes serial number, rank and type of casualty. The birthplace or residence of the deceased is not indicated. An introduction explaining how the list was compiled, a statistical tabulation, and the descriptions of the types of casualties incurred are also included.

The Stokes Treaty Commission

The Osage who left their old home and removed to the Verdigris, were known as the Arkansas Osage. They had no agent until 1822 when Nathaniel Philbrook was appointed sub-agent for them. He was drowned at the mouth of Grand River the latter part of March, 1824 as related by Colonel Chouteau. David Barbour was then appointed in his place at a salary of five hundred dollars yearly. Governor Alexander McNair ((Alexander McNair was born in Derry, Pa., in 1774; served in the Whiskey Insurrection as a lieutenant in 1794; appointed a lieutenant in the regular army April 23, 1799;…

Small Town Newspapers

Small Town Papers gives you free access to the people, places and events recorded in real time over the decades or even centuries! Browse and search the scanned newspaper archive from 1846 up to the current edition! Their archives contain millions of names of ancestors not found anywhere else. Enhance your Ancestry research with their high resolution scanned newspaper archive. Find distant relatives and discover your ethnic heritage by reading the articles about family and friends written back in the day.

Governor Houston at His Trading Post on the Verdigris

In February, 1828, the vanguard of Creek immigrants arrived at the Creek Agency on the Verdigris, in charge of Colonel Brearley, and they and the following members of the McIntosh party were located on a section of land that the Government promised in the treaty of 1826 to purchase for them. By the treaty of May 6, 1828, the Government assigned the Cherokee a great tract of land, to which they at once began to remove from their homes in Arkansas. The movement had been under way for some months when there appeared among the Indians the remarkable figure of…

The Osage Massacre

When the treaty council with the Osage at Fort Gibson broke up in disagreement on April 2, 1833, three hundred Osage warriors under the leadership of Clermont departed for the west to attack the Kiowa. It was Clermont’s boast that he never made war on the whites and never made peace with his Indian enemies. At the Salt Plains where the Indians obtained their salt, within what is now Woodward County, Oklahoma, they fell upon the trail of a large party of Kiowa warriors going northeast toward the Osage towns above Clermont’s. The Osage immediately adapted their course to that…

Calendar History of the Kiowa Indians

The Calendar History of the Kiowa Indians is a work of over 300 pages and is an original contribution of the highest value to ethnography. Its title affords but an imperfect idea of its scope; for, in addition to an elaborate description of the Kiowa calendars, the author gives us, in 106 pages, a sketch of the tribe including its documentary history, a list of western military and trading posts, an extensive glossary of the Kiowa language, and other items of information which lead to a thorough understanding of the calendars.

Fort Smith (Westark) Junior College Yearbooks 1929-2003

The Boreham Library at the University of Arkansas – Fort Smith, enabled 72 copies of the university yearbooks to be digitized and made freely available online, 1929-2003. The yearbooks during this period was known as the “Pioneer” and “Nuna”. Yearbooks provide a window into student life. From sports teams to clubs, fashions to hairstyles, these volumes document the changing attitudes and culture of college students year by year.

Washington Irving at Fort Gibson, 1832

The McIntosh Creeks had been located along Arkansas River near the Verdigris on fertile timbered land which they began at once to clear, cultivate, and transform into productive farms. The treaty of 1828 with the Cherokee gave the latter a great tract of land on both sides of Arkansas River embracing that on which the Creeks were located. This was accomplished by a blunder of the Government officials, in the language of the Secretary of War, ((U.S. House, Executive Documents, 22d congress, first session, no. 116, President’s Message submitting the memorial of the Creek Indians.)) “when we had not a…

Earliest Known Traders on Arkansas River

With the help of contemporary records it is possible to identify some of the early traders at the Mouth of the Verdigris. Even before the Louisiana Purchase, hardy French adventurers ascended the Arkansas in their little boats, hunting, trapping, and trading with the Indians, and recorded their presence if not their identity in the nomenclature of the adjacent country and streams, now sadly corrupted by their English-speaking successors. ((Many tributaries of Arkansas River originally bore French names. There was the Fourche La Feve named for a French family [Thwaites, R. G., editor, Early Western Travels, vol. xiii, 156]; the Petit…

Establishment of Fort Gibson in 1824

By Act of Congress of March 2, 1819, Arkansas Territory was established July 4, embracing substantially all of what are now the states of Arkansas and Oklahoma; though the civil government of Arkansas Territory was limited to that section lying east of the Osage line, divided into counties, and embracing approximately the present state of Arkansas. That west of the Osage line was the Indian country, and in later years became known as Indian Territory. James Miller ((James Miller was born in Peterboro, N. H., April 25, 1776; entered the array as major in 1808, became Lieutenant-colonel in 1810, and…

Establishment of Fort Smith in 1817

The white population in Arkansas in 1817 had increased to several thousand, whose protection, as well as that of the Cherokee people living in that territory, from the continued hostilities of the Osage, required the establishment of a military post at the western border dividing the white settlements from the Osage. From Saint Louis came further news of threatened hostilities by the Osage near Clermont’s Town, and a report ((Niles Register, (Baltimore) vol. xiii, 176.)) that Major William Bradford with a detachment of United States riflemen, and accompanied by Major Long, topographical engineer, had left that city for the purpose…

1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or…

Disbursements to Cherokees under the Treaty of May 6, 1828

Abstract of disbursements and expenditures made by George Vashon, Indian Agent for the Cherokees west of the Mississippi, under the stipulations of the Treaty with said tribe of 6th May, 1828, between the 16th September, 1830, and the 31st December, 1833. In total this list represents 390 Cherokee families and 1835 individuals who each received 25.75 as part of their payment under the 5th article of the treaty of 6th May, 1828.

Illinois Indians

The Illinois Indians belonged to the Algonquian linguistic family, and were closely connected with the Chippewa and the Miami. In historic times they lived principally along the Illinois and Mississippi Rivers…

North America Indian Names of Places in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, and Louisiana

The Indians all over this continent had names, traditions, religions, ceremonies, feasts, prayers, songs, dances all, more or less, with symbolism and allegory, adapted to circumstances, just as all other races of mankind. But the world has become so familiar with the continued and ridiculous publications in regard to everything touching upon that race of people that a universal doubt has long since been created and established as to the possibility of refinement of thought and nobleness of action ever having existed among the North American Indian race, ancient or modern; and so little of truth has also been learned…

Choctaw Nation and the Greer County Dispute

The Dispute In The Right Of Ownership Of Greer County Between The United States And Texas. The petition of the Attorney General of the United States affirms that according to the treaty of Feb. 22, 1819 made by the United States and the King of Spain, which was ratified two years later, and so proclaimed by both the United States and Spain, and that by the third article of the treaty it was provided and agreed that the boundary line between the two countries west of the Mississippi River shall begin on the Gulf of Mexico at the mouth of…

History of the Shakchi Humma Tribe

Oktibbeha ((O-ka-it-tib-ih-ha)) county, Mississippi, as well as its sister counties, has been the scene of many hard struggles between the contending warriors of the different tribes, who inhabited the noble old state in years of the long past; not only from the statements and traditions of the Choctaws, who were among the last of the Indian race whose council-fires lit up her forests, and whose hoyopatassuha died away upon her hills, but also from the numerous fortifications and entrenchments, that were plainly visible, ere the ploughshare had upturned her virgin soil, and her native- forests still stood in their primitive…

Natchez Trace

In 1792, in a council held at Chickasaw Bluffs, where Memphis, Tennessee, is now located, a treaty was made with the Chickasaws, in which they granted the United States the right of way through their territory for a public road to be opened from Nashville, Tennessee, to Natchez, Mississippi. This road was long known, and no doubt, remembered by many at the present time by the name “Natchez Trace.” It crossed the Tennessee River at a point then known as “Colberts Ferry,” and passed through the present counties of Tishomingo, Ittiwamba, Lee, Pantotoc, Chickasaw, Choctaw, thence on to Natchez, and…

Vaundreuil and the Chickasaws

At this juncture of affairs, May 10th 1743, the marquis of Vaudreuil arrived at New Orleans, and assumed command of the colonies, Bienville having been again deposed. As soon as the Chickasaws learned that Bienville had been superceded by a new governor, they sent four of their chiefs, at the close of the year 1743, to sue for peace; but Vaudreuil informed them he would enter into no treaty with them, unless they would drive all English traders from their territories; and not even then would he treat with them unless in concert with the Choctaws. Thus again were the Chickasaws…

The Chickasaw War of 1739

Through the instigation of The French the war was continued between the seemingly infatuated and blinded Choctaws and Chickasaws during the entire year 1737, yet without any perceptibly advantageous results to either. A long and bitter experience seemed wholly inadequate to teach them the selfish designs of the French. No one can believe the friendship of the French for the Choctaws was unassumed. They were unmerciful tyrants by whatever standard one may choose to measure them, and without a redeeming quality as far as their dealings with the North American Indians go to prove; and their desire for the good of that race of people utterly out of…

The Discovery Of This Continent, it’s Results To The Natives

In the year 1470, there lived in Lisbon, a town in Portugal, a man by the name of Christopher Columbus, who there married Dona Felipa, the daughter of Bartolome Monis De Palestrello, an Italian (then deceased), who had arisen to great celebrity as a navigator. Dona Felipa was the idol of her doting father, and often accompanied him in his many voyages, in which she soon equally shared with him his love of adventure, and thus became to him a treasure indeed not only as a companion but as a helper; for she drew his maps and geographical charts, and also…

The Cherokee Revolt – Indian Wars

From the removal of the Cherokee Indians from Georgia and Tennessee to Arkansas and their establishment upon the reservation allotted to them by treaty with the Government in Arkansas, they have, until the period of this outbreak to the narrative of which this chapter is devoted, been considered as among the least dangerous and most peaceable of the tribes in that region. But through various causes, chief among which has been notably the introduction among them of a horde of those pests of the West the border ruffians; these half wild, half-breed Nomads were encouraged by these Indians, as it…

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