Hawkins

Hawes Family of Wrentham, MA

For generations, since the early Colonial period, the Hawes family has been resident in Wrentham, Mass. The line is traced back to Edward Hawes, of Dedham, Mass., born probably about 1620, who died in 1686. He married April 15, 1648, Eliony Lombard. This genealogy discusses the line from Edward through Oliver Snow Hawes who removed to Fall River Mass. It then discusses the family and descendants of Olvier Snow Hawes who resided in the vicinity of Fall River.

History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago Counties, Iowa

History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago Counties, Iowa together with sketches of their cities, villages and townships, educational, civil, military and political history; portraits of prominent persons, and 641 biographies of representative citizens. Also included is a history of Iowa embracing accounts of the pre-historic races, and a brief review of its civil and military history.

Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

Jackson Family of Fall River, MA

Here in this article it is the purpose to treat of but one branch or family of the Massachusetts Jacksons – the family of John Jackson, who was a descendant of the Middleboro settler of the name, one John Jackson, and who in time removed to the State of Maine, the home State for several generations of the Fall River Jacksons in question. The first John Jackson came from England to New England and settled in Middleboro, where in May, 1714, he was married to Mary Smith. They had two children (if not more), John and Cornelius, the latter of whom was born in Middleboro Sept. 11, 1716. The father died in 1731.

The Lucketts of Portobacco

A genealogical history of Samuel Luckett, Gent, of Port Tobacco, Charles County, Maryland, and some of his descendants, with a sketch of the allied family of Ofifutt, of Prince Georges County, Maryland.

Adams, Adderton, Addison, Alexander, Applebaugh, Ashby, Atkisson, Baggett, Bainbridge, Baldwin, Barnes, Barney, Bartlett, Battle, Beale, Beall, Beatty, Beaven, Belt, Benson, Bethel, Blair, Borden, Bottrell, Bowie, Bradford, Brazier, Brengle, Briscoe, Brocke, Brogdon, Brown, Bryan, Burgess, Campbell, Cantwell, Carr, Carroll, Cave, Chiswell, Clapman, Clements, Clephane, Contee, Cooke, Cooper, Cope, Cox, Creek, Cumming, Dade, Davis, Delahay, Dent, Doling, Dorry, Dorsey, Douglas, Drone, Duval, Eagler, Earle, Edelen, Edmonston, Elms, Evans, Fendall, Ferguson, Field, Fink, Floyd, Fouch, Franklin, Galford, Gladden, Glahn, Glenn, Godfrey, Goodrick, Gracey, Graham, Gray, Green, Griffin, Gulick, Haddox, Hall, Hamill, Hamilton, Hanson, Harding, Harris, Harrison, Harrold, Hawkins, Haynie, Hobbs, Hobson, Holton, Hussey, Jamieson, Jenifer, Jenkins, Jett, Johnson, Jones, Jordan, Kalbfleisch, Keith, Kennedy, Kenner, Kerrick, Kybert, Langworth, Lawson, Lennarts, Lewis, Lilley, Lowe, Luckett, Lynn, Maddox, Magruder, Mantz, Manzy, Markham, Marlow, Martin, Marye, Mastin, Matthews, McCane, McCauley, Metcalf, Middleton, Miller, Minor, Mooney, Moore, Morehead, Morris, Mudd, Muir, Murray, Neale, Nelson, Nesbit, Nichnow, Nichollas, Odom, Offord, Offutt, Oldham, ORea, Orrell, Parker, Parnell, Patton, Payne, Perry, Peters, Peyton, Posey, Price, Ramsey, Rankin, Rasbury, Ratliff, Reed, Robey, Robinson, Roxborough, Sage, Sargeant, Sayles, Scott, Sewell, Seydel, Shaw, Shrive, Sidener, Skinner, Smith, Smoot, Sprigg, Spriplin, Steel, Stone, Sugar, Swansted, Swearingen, Taylor, Theobald, Thickpenny, Thompson, Tolson, Tongue, Trundle, Tyler, Venom, Wall, Wallace, Ware, Watkins, West, Westman, Wheadon, Wheeler, White, Whiting, Wickliff, Willcoxen, Williams, Withers, Witt, Wood, Woods, Woodward, Yates, Yost.

1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

Rough Riders

Compiled military service records for 1,235 Rough Riders, including Teddy Roosevelt have been digitized. The records include individual jackets which give the name, organization, and rank of each soldier. They contain cards on which information from original records relating to the military service of the individual has been copied. Included in the main jacket are carded medical records, other documents which give personal information, and the description of the record from which the information was obtained.

North America Indian Names of Places in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, and Louisiana

The Indians all over this continent had names, traditions, religions, ceremonies, feasts, prayers, songs, dances all, more or less, with symbolism and allegory, adapted to circumstances, just as all other races of mankind. But the world has become so familiar with the continued and ridiculous publications in regard to everything touching upon that race of …

North America Indian Names of Places in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, and Louisiana Read More »

1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry …

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The family of Nelson Drake

The family of Nelson Drake; back to 1630, New York and Michigan pioneers, with genealogy supplement. Surnames: Allen, Barre, Bickford, Boyer, Bravender, Brosius, Brown, Christmas, Corner, Coey, Cozzi, Davis, Day, Diener, Drake, Dust, Engleberg, Fishel, Fookes, Gorton, Groce, Hawkins, Hewes, Hill, Hilton, Hirsch, Huddlestun, Kaiser, Kellogg, Langfield, Lear, Martinchak, McClellan, Point, Rae, Rayner, Ritter, Roehm, Rossi, Shilander, Smith, Soule, Stingley, Tucker, Ward, Wauvle, West, White, Wickham, and Wright.

The Osage Massacre

When the treaty council with the Osage at Fort Gibson broke up in disagreement on April 2, 1833, three hundred Osage warriors under the leadership of Clermont departed for the west to attack the Kiowa. It was Clermont’s boast that he never made war on the whites and never made peace with his Indian enemies. At the Salt Plains where the Indians obtained their salt, within what is now Woodward County, Oklahoma, they fell upon the trail of a large party of Kiowa warriors going northeast toward the Osage towns above Clermont’s. The Osage immediately adapted their course to that pursued by their enemies following it back to what they knew would be the defenseless village of women, children, and old men left behind by the warriors. The objects of their cruel vengeance were camped at the mouth of Rainy-Mountain Creek, a southern tributary of the Washita, within the present limits of the reservation at Fort Sill.

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