Surname: Lilley

The Lucketts of Portobacco

The Lucketts of Portobacco

A genealogical history of Samuel Luckett, Gent, of Port Tobacco, Charles County, Maryland, and some of his descendants, with a sketch of the allied family of Ofifutt, of Prince Georges County, Maryland.

Adams, Adderton, Addison, Alexander, Applebaugh, Ashby, Atkisson, Baggett, Bainbridge, Baldwin, Barnes, Barney, Bartlett, Battle, Beale, Beall, Beatty, Beaven, Belt, Benson, Bethel, Blair, Borden, Bottrell, Bowie, Bradford, Brazier, Brengle, Briscoe, Brocke, Brogdon, Brown, Bryan, Burgess, Campbell, Cantwell, Carr, Carroll, Cave, Chiswell, Clapman, Clements, Clephane, Contee, Cooke, Cooper, Cope, Cox, Creek, Cumming, Dade, Davis, Delahay, Dent, Doling, Dorry, Dorsey, Douglas, Drone, Duval, Eagler, Earle, Edelen, Edmonston, Elms, Evans, Fendall, Ferguson, Field, Fink, Floyd, Fouch, Franklin, Galford, Gladden, Glahn, Glenn, Godfrey, Goodrick, Gracey, Graham, Gray, Green, Griffin, Gulick, Haddox, Hall, Hamill, Hamilton, Hanson, Harding, Harris, Harrison, Harrold, Hawkins, Haynie, Hobbs, Hobson, Holton, Hussey, Jamieson, Jenifer, Jenkins, Jett, Johnson, Jones, Jordan, Kalbfleisch, Keith, Kennedy, Kenner, Kerrick, Kybert, Langworth, Lawson, Lennarts, Lewis, Lilley, Lowe, Luckett, Lynn, Maddox, Magruder, Mantz, Manzy, Markham, Marlow, Martin, Marye, Mastin, Matthews, McCane, McCauley, Metcalf, Middleton, Miller, Minor, Mooney, Moore, Morehead, Morris, Mudd, Muir, Murray, Neale, Nelson, Nesbit, Nichnow, Nichollas, Odom, Offord, Offutt, Oldham, ORea, Orrell, Parker, Parnell, Patton, Payne, Perry, Peters, Peyton, Posey, Price, Ramsey, Rankin, Rasbury, Ratliff, Reed, Robey, Robinson, Roxborough, Sage, Sargeant, Sayles, Scott, Sewell, Seydel, Shaw, Shrive, Sidener, Skinner, Smith, Smoot, Sprigg, Spriplin, Steel, Stone, Sugar, Swansted, Swearingen, Taylor, Theobald, Thickpenny, Thompson, Tolson, Tongue, Trundle, Tyler, Venom, Wall, Wallace, Ware, Watkins, West, Westman, Wheadon, Wheeler, White, Whiting, Wickliff, Willcoxen, Williams, Withers, Witt, Wood, Woods, Woodward, Yates, Yost.

Descendants of Jonathan P. Lund of New Bedford, MA

For two hundred and more years, since toward the close of the seventeenth century, the Lund family has played its part in Massachusetts-New Hampshire history, the changing of the line between the two Commonwealths in the middle of the eighteenth century transferring them to New Hampshire. Reference is made to the Old Dunstable, Mass., Nashua, N. H. family of the name, and to the especial branch of the latter family which in the early years of the century but recently closed removed to Acushnet, in the town of New Bedford, this State. The head of this latter family was the late Jonathan P. Lund, who some three-quarters of a century ago established the hardware and tin business, which was long carried on by him, assisted in time by his son, the present venerable Parkman Macy Lund, who later succeeded the father, the two being among the substantial men and worthy citizens of this community.

Rev. James Keith

Descendants of Charles Keith of Bridgewater, Massachusetts

For the ancestry of Charles Keith, please see Descendants of Rev. James Keith of Bridgewater, Massachusetts (VI) Charles Keith, son of Benjamin, was born Aug. 8, 1794, and married Dec. 8, 1817, Mehitable Perkins, born March 23, 1795, daughter of Josiah and Anna (Reynolds) Perkins, of North Bridgewater, both of whom were descendants of historic old New England families. To this union were born children as follows: Damaris Williams Keith, born Oct. 8, 1818, married Vinal Lyon, of North Bridgewater, where she died Charles Perkins Keith, born June 20, 1820, is mentioned below Anna Reynolds Keith, born Nov. 11, 1822,

1860 Free Inhabitants Creek Nation Page 1

1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

Grover C. Lilley

Mess Sergt., 113th F. A., Bty. B, 30th Div. Born in Beaufort County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. Jas. R. Lilley. Entered the service June 29, 1917, at Washington, N.C. Was sent to Camp Sevier, S. C., and from there to Camp Mills. Sailed for France May 8, 1918. Fought at St. Mihiel, Argonne Forest and Woevre. Returned to the USA March 17, 1919, and was mustered out at Camp Jackson March, 1919.