AccessGenealogy

AccessGenealogy.com contains the largest collection of free genealogy for your United States research. Find hundreds of thousands of free websites with billions of names you can use to further your family genealogy! Specifically, we provide sources for birth records, death records, marriage records, census records, tax records, church records, court records, military records, historical newspapers, cemeteries, and ethnic records. We also provide some historical details about different times and people in America’s history. Our specialty, however, is Native American genealogy and research. You can always access our Native American collection of material, by using the link at the top of every page.

Access Genealogy directs researchers to free United States genealogy resources online. We do this in two methods, by categorizing your search (links in the menu at the top of every page) or by enabling you to search by locality (links on the right of every page under the US Genealogy heading).

Our search is found on the right of every page, but remember it only searches our website, and not the hundreds of thousands we link to. It also doesn’t search our databases. You will need to search those one-by-one.

If you wish to stay up-to-date with each of our new posts, then subscribe to AccessGenealogy. Be forewarned, we do add pages frequently, so you may get multiple emails each day. If you would prefer, you can find us at AccessGenealogy on Facebook and receive notifications in that manner!

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on pinterest
Pinterest
Share on tumblr
Tumblr
Share on stumbleupon
StumbleUpon

Free Genealogy

Newton High School in 1910
Massachusetts

Newton Massachusetts High School Yearbooks 1910-2012

The Newton Public Library has uploaded all of the Newton High School Yearbooks from 1910 through 2012 to InternetArchive. We provide quick links to each edition in chronological order below. Each link takes you to the volume for that year (some years had 2 volumes) enabling you to peruse and read the yearbook. If you want to download a copy there is a link at the top that enables you to do so for free.

1665 A description of the towne of Mannados or New Amsterdam
Featured

The Records of New Amsterdam from 1653 to 1674

This work contains the earliest Dutch Records that have been preserved of the territory included in the present City of New York, the earlier ones having long ago disappeared. These are “The Minutes of the Burgomasters and Schepens of New Amsterdam from 1653 to 1674,” but contain a very few entries preceding the former date. They are contained in six folio volumes of manuscript, in the Dutch language, as spoken and written in the middle of the seventeenth century; and are preserved in the Manuscript room of the City Library in the City Hall. Until the earlier part of this century they remained as they were written. Then the first of the six volumes was translated for the municipality by a gentleman named Westbrook, but not well done, and with it his labors ended. The next step was not taken till 1848. On the twenty-second of January in that year, the Mayor approved a resolution of the Common Council, appointing Edmund B. O’Callaghan, M.D., the author of the History of New Netherland, and editor of the four volumes of the Documentary History of New York and of the eleven volumes of the Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New York (two works published by the State), to translate the remaining five Dutch volumes.

record-image_3QS7-89W3-39QL-W
Alabama

United States Bureau of Land Management Tract Books, 1800-c. 1955

3,907 land management tract books containing official records of the land status and transactions involving surveyed public lands arranged by state and then by township and range. These books indicate who obtained the land, and include a physical description of the tract and where the land is located. The type of transaction is also recorded such as cash entry, credit entry, homesteads, patents (deeds) granted by the Federal Government, and other conveyances of title such as Indian allotments, internal improvement grants (to states), military bounty land warrants, private land claims, railroad grants, school grants, and swamp grants. Additional items of information included in the tract books are as follows: number of acres, date of sale, purchase price, land office, entry number, final Certificate of Purchase number, and notes on relinquishments and conversions.

Sample page from Sacramento California's Mug Books
California

Sacramento California Police Mug Books 1864-1949

Mug Books of the past have been replaced by computer databases now, but back before the days of computers and databases, they served as an effective method for Police Departments to keep track of past criminals and wanted people. The Sacramento Police Department has generously provided these scanned images to archive.org for free access to everyone. If you are not aware if one of your ancestors may have been arrested for a crime, then I suggest you first search the newspaper records available online for free of Sacramento California, so that you have a year span to choose from. Unless you’re like me and just like perusing the old mug shots…

Index of Marriages in New Jersey
Featured

New Jersey Marriage Index 1901-2016

Alec Ferretti, a budding genealogist, took upon himself the task of filing an OPRA request with the New Jersey Department of Health, seeking the marriage indices that legally should have been made available to the public (based on the law) but had not been. After being denied his request, he sought the help of genealogist’s newest friends, Reclaim the Records. They with their legal team helped Alec successfully challenge the denial, and to make this story short, though it wasn’t, they were able to get the indices available opened to the public and published on Archive.org. The setup at archive, not being conducive to a quick search, I have provided the links straight to the data, along with explanation text as provided by Reclaim the Records.

Free Genealogy Archives

Wainwright and related families

These sketches were written primarily to trace the paternal ancestry of Mary Wainwright who was born in Somerset County, Maryland, May 11, 1818. She married, November 15, 1837, William Underwood Roberts. They became the parents of a family of six sons and five daughters, all of whom were born at Jesterville and lived to mature years. Mary Wainwright Roberts had, at the time of her death, October 11, 1904, at the age of eighty-six years, more than eighty living descendants. Her ancestry involves, besides her Wainwright forebears, the Cannons, the Bloyces, the Evanses, the Streets, the Rices, and others about whom something is said in this sketch, as well as several other ancient Somerset families.

The Waitley family in the United States

John S. Waitley is the earliest known ancestor of the Waitley name in the United States. According to this sketch, John S. Waitley was a native of Scotland. His parents came to America and settled in Massachusetts. Later his mother was lost at sea when on a return visit to Scotland. John S. Waitley married Lydia Bartlett, a daughter of Josiah Bartlett, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. He became a minister of the Free-will Baptist Church. He moved to Ashtabula County, Ohio, lived there several years and later moved to Canton, Ohio. He died in Knox County, Ohio, in 1868 at the age of 96. His wife died in 1858 in Knox County, Ohio. They had lived in Mt. Vernon most of the time.

Wakefield Kindred of America

Wakefield Kindred of America provides the genealogy of John Wakefield, the immigrant ancestor of the Boston Family, who was born in England in 1614-15. He was according to the best information at hand, a native of Gravesend, county Kent, England, as Thomas Wakefield, probably his brother, came from that town which was an ancient seat of this family.

Genealogical Record of Thomas Wait and his descendants

Genealogical Record of Thomas Wait and his descendants looks at the genealogy of Thomas Wait (1601-1677) who was from Wethersfield Parish, Essex, England. On his arrival in America, landing in Rhode Island, he applied for a lot on which to build,and was granted it on 7/1/1639. On 3/l6/l641 he became a Freeman in Newport R. I. He died in Portsmouth R. I., before April 1677 intestate. This Thomas Wait was a cousin to the Richard Waite of Watertown Mass., who was a large land owner. This unpublished manuscript provides the descendants of this family.

Andrews and Wakelee Families of Waterbury Connecticut 1650-1947

Andrews and Wakelee 1650-1947 manuscript provides a brief genealogy of the descendants of John and Mary Andruss of Hartford Connecticut through their son Abraham, one of the 30 original families of Mattatuck, afterward called Waterbury. The second part of the Andrews and Wakelee 1650-1947 manuscript provides the descendants of Henry and Sarah Wakelee of Hartford Connecticut, through their son Ebenezer, who also settled in Waterbury.

A Place of Their Own – A History of Saint Adalbert Church Enfield Connecticut 1915-1990

You may be surprised, at first, by how much space is given to the history of Enfield’s Polish community in general. St. Adalbert’s was a product of that community. What happened in the community affected the parish, and what took place in the parish often had an impact on the community. The story of St. Adalbert’s, then, could only be properly told within the larger story of the people it was established to serve.

Roots in Birmingham

Roots in Birmingham is a compilation of interviews with Birmingham residents, evoking the neighborhood’s history and culture. A “Birmingham Cultural Center Book” Stories collected from Judy (Farkas) Balogh, Elizabeth “Kardy”(Kordas) Boray, Anna (Potoczki) Fabos, John Gocsik, Father Martin Hernady, Margaret “Peg”(v) Horvath, Nancy (Packo) Horvath, Lillian (Kertz) Keil, William Kertesz, Mary (Christian) King, Mariska Kinsey-LaCava, Eleanor (Weizer) Mesteller, Don and Barb Nyitray, John Oravec, Paul John Slovak, William Szabo, Steven Tarczali, Barbara (Priscsak) Torok, Alberta (Taylor) Traylor, Magdalene Ujvagi, Peter Ujvagi, Pete Vas, Jr. and Martha (Boden) Young.

Birmingham: reflections on community

This book is the second volume of a collaborative project called “Birmingham Remembers” Residents of the Birmingham neighborhood had been interviewed in the 1980s. With this project the participants comments are organized by topic. Topics include heritage, education, religion, work, recreation, neighborhood, rituals, holidays, the Great Depression, military service, the Hungarian Revolution, activism and reminiscences.”

An account of Percival and Ellen Green and of some of their descendants

An account of Percival and Ellen Green and of some of their descendants includes nine generations of descendants for Percival and Ellen Green. Percival and Ellen were transported from London to New England aboard the Suzan and Ellin in 1635. They settled in Cambridge, Massachusetts Bay, and had several generations of descendants who resided there.

Diary of Ezra Green, M.D.

Ezra Green (1746-1847) was a surgeon aboard the Continental Ship-of-War “Ranger” when he penned a diary describing the voyage and conflicts met. The diary itself will shed light on other members of the crew, some who lost their lives in battle. Also included in the manuscript are two brief genealogies of early ancestors of Ezra, James Green of Charlestown and John Hayes of Dover.

Walter Merryman of Harpswell, Maine, and his descendants

Walter Merryman was kidnapped in an Irish port in 1700 and brought to Boston, Massachusetts, where he was indentured to a shipbuilder in Portland, Maine. He married Elizabeth Potter and settled in Harpswell, Maine. Descendants and relatives lived in Maine, New Hampshire, Connecticut, New York, Pennsylvania, Idaho and elsewhere. Includes Alexander, Curtiss, Hamilton, McManus, Stover, Webber and related families.