Apache

Yavapai Apache Tribe

Yavapai Apache Indians, Yavapai Indians, Apache Mohave Indians (said to be from enyaéva ‘sun,’ pai `people’: ‘people of the sun’). A Yuman tribe, popularly known as Apache Mohave and Mohave Apache, i. e., ‘hostile or warlike Mohave.’ According to Corbusier, the tribe, before its removal to the Rio Verde agency in May 1873, claimed as its …

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Tonto Apache Tribe

Tontos (Spanish: ‘fools,’ so called on account of their supposed imbecility; the designation, however, is a misnomer). A name so indiscriminately applied as to be almost meaningless. To a mixture of Yavapai, Yuma, and Mohave, with some Pifialeno Apache, placed on the Rio Verde Reservation, Arizona, in 1873, and transferred to San Carlos Reservation in …

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Lipan Apache Tribe

Lipan Apache Indians (adapted from Ipa-n’de, apparently a personal name; n’de=’people’). An Apache tribe, designating themselves Náizhan (‘ours,’ ‘our kind’), which at various periods of the 18th and 19th centuries roamed from the lower Rio Grande in New Mexico and Mexico eastward through Texas to the Gulf coast, gaining a livelihood by depredations against other …

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Jicarilla Apache Tribe

Jicarilla (Mexican Spanish: `little basket’). An Athapascan tribe, first so called by Spaniards because of their expertness in making vessels of basketry. They apparently formed a part of the Vaqueros of early Spanish chronicles, although, according to their creation legend, they have occupied from the earliest period the mountainous region of southeast Colorado and northern …

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Arivaipa Apache Tribe

Arivaipa Apache Indians, Arivaipa Indians (Nevome Pima: aarirapa, ‘girls,’ possibly applied to these people on account of some unmanly act). An Apache tribe that formerly made its home in the canyon of Arivaipa Creek, a tributary of the Rio San Pedro, south Arizona, although like the Chiricahua and other Apache of Arizona they raided far southward …

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Chiricahua Apache Tribe

Chiricahua Indians, Chiricahua Apache Indians (Apache: `great mountain’). An important division of the Apache Indians, so called from their former mountain home in southeast Arizona. Their own name is Aiaha. The Chiricahua were the most warlike of the Arizona Indians, their raids extending into New Mexico, south Arizona, and north Sonora, among their most noted leaders …

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Faraon Apache Tribe

Faraon (‘Pharaoh’) Apache Indians. A tribe of Apache. From references in early Spanish writings to the “Apache hordes of Pharaoh,” it is assumed that the name of the Faraon Apache was thus derived. This tribe, no longer known by name, seems to have formed the south division of the Querecho of Coronado (1541), the Vaqueros …

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Apache Tribe

Apache Indians (probably from ápachu, ‘enemy,’ the Zuñi name for the Navaho, who were designated “Apaches de Nabaju” by the early Spaniards in New Mexico). A number of tribes forming the most southerly group of the Athapascan family. The name has been applied also to some unrelated Yuman tribes, as the Apache Mohave (Yavapai) and …

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Condition of the Alabama Indians in 1890

Total Indian Population As Of June 1, 1890 Reservation Indians, not taxed (not counted in the general census): Males…….149 Females….235 Total………384 Indians self-supporting, taxed (counted in the general census): Males…….338 Females….421 Total………759 Grand Total 1,148 The civilized (self-supporting) Indians of Alabama, counted in the general census, number 759, 338 males and 421 females, and are …

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