Topic: Apache

Arivaipa Apache Tribe

Arivaipa Apache Indians, Arivaipa Indians (Nevome Pima: aarirapa, ‘girls,’ possibly applied to these people on account of some unmanly act). An Apache tribe that formerly made its home in the canyon of Arivaipa Creek, a tributary of the Rio San Pedro, south Arizona, although like the Chiricahua and other Apache of Arizona they raided far southward and were reputed to have laid waste every town in northern Mexico as far as the Gila prior to the Gadsden purchase in 1853, and with having exterminated the Sobaipuri, a Piman tribe, in the latter part of the 18th century. In 1863 a company

Chiricahua Apache Tribe

Chiricahua Indians, Chiricahua Apache Indians (Apache: `great mountain’). An important division of the Apache Indians, so called from their former mountain home in southeast Arizona. Their own name is Aiaha. The Chiricahua were the most warlike of the Arizona Indians, their raids extending into New Mexico, south Arizona, and north Sonora, among their most noted leaders being Cochise, Victorio, Loco, Chato, Nahche, Bonito and Geronimo. Physically they do not differ materially from the other Apache. The men are well built, muscular, with well-developed chests, sound and regular teeth, and abundant hair. The women are even more vigorous and strongly built, with

Faraon Apache Tribe

Faraon (‘Pharaoh’) Apache Indians. A tribe of Apache. From references in early Spanish writings to the “Apache hordes of Pharaoh,” it is assumed that the name of the Faraon Apache was thus derived. This tribe, no longer known by name, seems to have formed the south division of the Querecho of Coronado (1541), the Vaqueros of Benavides (1630) and other 17th century writers, and part at least of the Llaneros of more recent times. Their principal range was that part of New Mexico lying between the Rio Grande and the Pecos, although their raids extended beyond this area. Nothing is

Nahche

Apache Chiefs and Leaders

Geronimo Geronimo (Spanish for Jerome, applied by the Mexicans as a nickname; native name Goyathlay, `one who yawns’). A medicine man and prophet of the Chiricahua Apache who, in the latter part of the 19th century, acquired notoriety through his opposition to the authorities and by systematic and sensational advertising; born about 1834 at the headwaters of Gila River, New Mexico, near old Ft Tulerosa. His father was Taklishim, ‘The Gray One,’ who was not a chief, although his father (Geronimo’s grandfather) assumed to be a chief without heredity or election. Geronimo’s mother was known as Juana. When it was

Apache Tribe

Apache Indians (probably from ápachu, ‘enemy,’ the Zuñi name for the Navaho, who were designated “Apaches de Nabaju” by the early Spaniards in New Mexico). A number of tribes forming the most southerly group of the Athapascan family. The name has been applied also to some unrelated Yuman tribes, as the Apache Mohave (Yavapai) and Apache Yuma. The Apache call themselves N’de, Dĭnë, Tĭnde, or Inde, `people.’ They were evidently not so numerous about the beginning of the 17th century as in recent times, their numbers apparently having been increased by captives from other tribes, particularly the Pueblos, Pima, Papago,

Condition of the Alabama Indians in 1890

Total Indian Population As Of June 1, 1890 Reservation Indians, not taxed (not counted in the general census): Males…….149 Females….235 Total………384 Indians self-supporting, taxed (counted in the general census): Males…….338 Females….421 Total………759 Grand Total 1,148 The civilized (self-supporting) Indians of Alabama, counted in the general census, number 759, 338 males and 421 females, and are distributed as follows: Autauga County, 116 Escambia County, 173 Mobile County, 4023 other counties with 8 or less in each, 68. The mode of life of these Indians is akin to that of their neighbors of small property. Among them are the descendants of Creek,