Topic: Apache

Yavapai Apache Tribe

Yavapai Apache Indians, Yavapai Indians, Apache Mohave Indians (said to be from enyaéva ‘sun,’ pai `people’: ‘people of the sun’). A Yuman tribe, popularly known as Apache Mohave and Mohave Apache, i. e., ‘hostile or warlike Mohave.’ According to Corbusier, the tribe, before its removal to the Rio Verde agency in May 1873, claimed as its range the valley of the Rio Verde and the Black mesa from Salt river as far as Bill Williams mountains, west Arizona. They then numbered about 1,000. Earlier they ranged much farther west, appearing to have had rancherias on the Rio Colorado; but they were

Pinal Coyotero Apache Tribe

Pinal Coyotero Indians. A part of the Coyotero Apache, whose chief rendezvous was the Pinal mountains and their vicinity, north of Gila River in Arizona. They ranged, however, about the sources of the Gila, over the Mogollon Mesa, and from northern Arizona to the Gila and even southward. They are now under the San Carlos and Ft Apache agencies, where they are officially classed as Coyoteros. According to Bourke, there were surviving among them in 1882 the following clans (or bands): Chisnedinadinaye Destchetinaye Gadinchin Kaihatin Klokadakaydn Nagokaydn Nagosugn Tegotsugn Titsessinaye Tutsoshin Tutzose Tziltadin Yagoyecayn They are reputed by tradition to

Tonto Apache Tribe

Tontos (Spanish: ‘fools,’ so called on account of their supposed imbecility; the designation, however, is a misnomer). A name so indiscriminately applied as to be almost meaningless. To a mixture of Yavapai, Yuma, and Mohave, with some Pifialeno Apache, placed on the Rio Verde Reservation, Arizona, in 1873, and transferred to San Carlos Reservation in 1875; best designated as the Tulkepaia. To a tribe of the Athapascan family well known as Coyotero Apache. To the Piftalenos of the same family. According to Corbusier, to a body of Indians descended mostly from Yavapai men and Pinal Coyotero ( Pinaleño ) women

Apache Indian Research

Apache Indians (probably from ápachu, ‘enemy,’ the Zuñi name for the Navaho, who were designated “Apaches de Nabaju” by the early Spaniards in New Mexico). A number of tribes forming the most southerly group of the Athapascan family. The name has been applied also to some unrelated Yuman tribes, as the Apache Mohave (Yavapai) and Apache Yuma. The Apache call themselves N’de, Dĭnë, Tĭnde, or Inde, `people.’ Read more about the Apache Tribe History. Archives, Libraries, and Societies Museum of New Mexico Apache Cultural Center & Museum (hosted at White Mountain Apache Tribe Apache Indian Biography Indian Chiefs and Leaders

Lipan Apache Tribe

Lipan Apache Indians (adapted from Ipa-n’de, apparently a personal name; n’de=’people’). An Apache tribe, designating themselves Náizhan (‘ours,’ ‘our kind’), which at various periods of the 18th and 19th centuries roamed from the lower Rio Grande in New Mexico and Mexico eastward through Texas to the Gulf coast, gaining a livelihood by depredations against other tribes and especially against the white settlements of Texas and Mexico. The name has probably been employed to include other Apache groups of the southern plains, such as the Mescaleros and the Kiowa Apache. The Franciscan mission of San Saba was established among the Lipan

Mimbreños Apache Tribe

Mimbreños (Spanish: ‘people of the willows’). A branch of the Apache who took their popular name from the Mimbres mountains, southwest New Mexico, but who roamed over the country from the east side of the Rio Grande in New Mexico to San Francisco River in Arizona, a favorite haunt being near Lake Guzman, west of El Paso, in Chihuahua. Between 1854 and 1869 their number was estimated at 400 to 750, under Mangas Coloradas. In habits they were similar to the other Apache, gaining a livelihood by raiding settlements in New Mexico, Arizona, and Mexico. They made peace with the

Mescalero Apache Tribe

Mescaleros Apache Indians (Spanish: `mescal people,’ from their custom of eating mescal). An Apache tribe which formed a part of the Faraones and Vaqueros of different periods of the Spanish history of the southwest. Their principal range was between the Rio Grande and the Pecos in New Mexico, but it extended also into the Staked plains and southward into Coahuila, Mexico. They were never regarded as so warlike as the Apache of Arizona, otherwise they were generally similar. Mooney 1Mooney, field notes, B. A. E., 1897 records the following divisions: Nataina Tuetinini Tsihlinainde Guhlkainde Tahuunde These bands intermarry, and each

Jicarilla Apache Tribe

Jicarilla (Mexican Spanish: `little basket’). An Athapascan tribe, first so called by Spaniards because of their expertness in making vessels of basketry. They apparently formed a part of the Vaqueros of early Spanish chronicles, although, according to their creation legend, they have occupied from the earliest period the mountainous region of southeast Colorado and northern New Mexico, their range at various periods extending eastward to western Kansas and Oklahoma, and into northwest Texas. The Arkansas, Rio Grande, and Canadian Rivers figure in their genesis myth 1Mooney in Am. Anthrop., XI, 200, 1898 , but their traditions seem to center about