Collection: Letterbooks of William Henry Lyttleton

William Henry Lyttelton

Papers of William Henry Lyttelton 1756-1760

Letterbooks of William Henry Lyttleton 1756-1760: This collection contains papers relating to William Henry Lyttelton’s career as governor of South Carolina, including letters from officials in London; correspondence with other southern governors relating to Indian affairs, frontier defense, and boundaries; correspondence with military officers in America; and communications with the South Carolina Commons House and Council. A series of reports by Edmond Atkin, superintendent of Indian affairs in the Southern District, provides valuable information on the Cherokees, Creeks, and Chickasaws. There are 142 items, 1761-1766, concerning Lyttelton’s governorship of Jamaica, including material on the Negro insurrection of 1765 in St. Mary’s Parish.

1758, February 20, Letter to His Excellency

Sir Your Dispatches of the 18th and 30th tell I received the 18th Just –f. James Holmes, The lak Affair of Sam Binn is Intirely forgot, and the Indians all satisfy’d, As to the Tellico People Jean Denture to Afsure you Excellency that they are Entirely Reformed, and behave Ex treamly well, and (Thank God) we at present live in Great Harmony, and Friendship with all the Nation. On the 15th selt arrived at this Fort the Little Carpenter, and the Great Warriour of Chotta, with their Party, they brought with them, two French men, and the Twighvee Indian woman

1758, November 27, Fort Loudoun

Sir this is to acquaint, your Excellency that the 25 jnstant two Runners came to latt me know that the great Warriour and judge Friend, (who had been to war Some time ago towards the French Fort) were at a Day’s Journey from the Fort; Accordingly yesterday, judge Friend with his Gang Came, and told me that the great Warrior and him, with the rest would wait on me, which they did, j recived them with the Honour that they expect on Such Occasion, j gave them an Entertainment, and the two warriors dined with me, they brought three Scalps,

1759, January 1, Fort Loudoun

Sir J have recived your Excellency’s Dispatche of the 15 December Sic Days before j recived from Lieut. Outerbriege a Copy of Mr. Duvalt’s Letters, and in the Same time, two of your Letters, one Octr. 27th, the other Novr. 18th immediately j sent to Old Hop to acquaint him that j had Letters to Communicate to him the next Day. Accordingly j went, and found him in the Town House, with many jndians. J thanck’d him in your Name for all the goods Talks that he had given from timt to time and hoped he would percerer in his

1758, March 2, Fort Loudoun

Sir Your Dispatch I received the 28th ultimate and immediately ordered Willm. Woodwareth to get himSelf ready. I am very Glad that the Earl of Loudoun has granted us Provisions, and would to God, it had be so before I come to this Place, it would have saved me great deal of trouble & uneaSiness. You acquaint me, Sir, that Mr. Stead is to Supply the Fort with ProviSions, I wiSh he may Send Send Some Body as soom as possible to Settle with with my store Keeper, and Send Some Meat Kind, for there is none to be got

1757, August 4, Letter to Cherokee Nation

Edmon Pittkins Esq. His Britainioh Majesty King George’s Agent for and Superintendent of the Affairs of his faithfull Allies the Severall Nations of Indians fr_habiting the frontiers of his colonife of Original, North Carolina, and South Carolina, and Georgia and their Confererates To Conicoughly Governour of the whole Nation of Cherokee Indians. Brother, King George the father of all the white people L____ on thir Side the Great Water, hath talen it into Consideration that the Governour’s of his severall Colonies have Enough to do to mind wile the Affairs of the White people; and cannot go to Visit the

1757, October 11, Letter #2

Sir On the 13th September arrived at his House Judge Friend very Sick from Virginia, he has brought some Horses Loaded with presents, and a White Man to wait on him, the next Day at his own Request I went to see him, as he Lives but Little Distance from the Fort. he told me he was very glad to see me, and if he had been well, he would have sav’d me the Trouble, but as soon as he should find himself better, he would come to have a talk with me, and would Inquire of the Conduct of

1757, October 8, Willanawa’s Talk

Wee the Cherokees have always received good Talks from our Brother the Governor of South Carolina, till this Last, which is Concerning the Spilling of Blood, Wee hope Neverthelefs, that we shall ever for the future, have Contrary Talks, Wee hope our Ears will always be Open, to hear what Our Father King George, and our Brother in Carolina says to us. The Governor of Chotee is present, and hears my Talk, He Loves his People, As his Father King George Order’d him, to Love and Regard all the English & Cherokees, who are Brothers and all his Children, The

1758, October 15, Fort Loudoun

Sir two Days ago j recived you Excellency’s Letter of the 28th of August, with another for Old Hop. Accordingly yesterday j went to Chotee and delivered it to him he told me, he was very glad to hear from you, and desired me to acquaint your Excellency that you Might depend on him, and that he would do always his best Endeavours, to keep Peace & Harmony between the English, & his People, that he was very Sorry, for what had happened but he could not help it. As Mr. Beamer’s Son was with me, he gave him a

1758, November 6, Fort Loudoun

Sir J recived your Letter of the 2 of Octr. And Since j had the Honour to write you Excellency last, Every Body has been very Quiet in these Parts. Few Days ago old Hop invited me to go to his Town, accordingly j went; as j was riding throw their Towns j was Sruprised to See all their House Shewt up, and no Man, When j camd to Chotee j asked the old Man what was become of all the Men, for j had seen but three of four, he answered they are all gone hunting but, said he,