Vital Records

The Register of Saint Paul’s Parish, 1715-1798

The “Register of Saint Paul’s Parish, 1715-1798: Stafford County, Virginia, 1715-1776; King George County, Virginia, 1777-1798” stands as an invaluable resource for genealogists and historians alike, documenting the early inhabitants of Virginia across two jurisdictions over eight decades. This publication, meticulously compiled and now presented in a handsomely bound volume thanks to the restoration efforts sponsored by the John Lee and Lillian Thomas Pratt Foundation in 1940. This book is free to read and download.

Vital records of Southborough, Massachusetts

The list of vital records of Southborough, Massachusetts, comprised in this volume includes all which were entered in the Town Books during the period from the earliest date there found to the end of the year 1849. Some additions and corrections of names and dates have been made from the records of the First Church, these being indicated in each instance by proper reference. There are a total of 6,297 births, marriages, and deaths recorded. This book is free to read or download.

Vital records of Rowley Massachusetts

The following records of births, marriages and deaths include all entries to be found in the books of record kept by the town clerks; in the church records; in the returns made to the Essex County Quarterly Court; in the cemetery inscriptions; and in the private records found in family Bibles, etc. These records are printed in a condensed form in which every essential particular has been preserved. All duplication of the town clerks’ record has been eliminated, but differences in entry and other explanatory matter appear in brackets. Parentheses are used when they occur in the original record; also to indicate the maiden name of a married woman, and to show variations in the spelling of a name in the same entry.

Moretown Vermont Annual Reports 1910-1957

These Moretown, Vermont town reports, published annually, serve as comprehensive repositories of crucial information about Moretown, Vermont. Their contents can differ, depending on the year of publication, largely due to evolving legal stipulations on what they must include. Starting in 1927, these reports provide vital statistical data for a particular year, such as records of births, deaths, and marriages. Note that the records may traverse across two different pages. Included in all reports are the financial details of the town and these often include payments made to individuals who performed services, such as teaching, janitorial, construction, road work, etc. Many of the Moretown’s families find themselves listed within these pages.

Vital Records of Dartmouth Massachusetts to 1850

The Vital Records of Dartmouth Massachusetts to 1850 are alphabetical indexes to the manuscript records of the town of Dartmouth, supplemented by information from family bible records, church registers, cemetery inscriptions, and other sources, showing the vital records of the town inhabitants from its earliest dates to 1850. This free book is 3 volumes in one, volume I, containing birth records, vol II, containing marriage records, and vol III, containing death records.

The William Wade Hinshaw index to Pennsylvania Quaker meeting records

These monthly meeting records were abstracted from the original Pennsylvania Quaker Monthly Meeting records in the 1930’s by William Wade Hinshaw of Washington, D. C. They are a transcription of the microfilmed records containing birth, death, burial, and marriage records, as well as meeting minutes, removals and certificates. After Hinshaw’s death, the unpublished material was …

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1912-1943 Mississippi Death Index

Christopher Smothers, a college student, and professional genealogist who specializes in Deep South research, always wondered to himself why the Mississippi Death index for 1912-1943 was hidden at the Mississippi Department of Archives and History in Jackson Mississippi. Why wasn’t this more widely available? Fast forward a few years, and multiple conversations, and the cog …

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New Jersey Marriage Index 1901-2016

Alec Ferretti, a budding genealogist, took upon himself the task of filing an OPRA request with the New Jersey Department of Health, seeking the marriage indices that legally should have been made available to the public (based on the law) but had not been. After being denied his request, he sought the help of genealogist’s newest friends, Reclaim the Records. They with their legal team helped Alec successfully challenge the denial, and to make this story short, though it wasn’t, they were able to get the indices available opened to the public and published on Archive.org. The setup at archive, not being conducive to a quick search, I have provided the links straight to the data, along with explanation text as provided by Reclaim the Records.

Lowell Massachusetts Genealogy

Tracing ancestors in Lowell, Massachusetts online and for free has been greatly enhanced by the University of Massachusetts in Lowell which provided digitized version of a large quantity of the Lowell public records. Combined with the cemetery and census records available freely online, you should be able to easily trace your ancestors from the founding of Lowell in 1826 through 1940, the last year of available census records. To add color to the otherwise basic facts of your ancestors existence we provide free access to a wide range of manuscripts on the history of Lowell, it’s manufactures and residents.

Lowell Massachusetts Annual Reports 1862-1928

Most towns in New England started publishing annual reports of the town’s public business in the 1800’s and many smaller towns still carry on that trait today. The following list of 52 free annual reports for Lowell Massachusetts covers the years of 1862-1928 (incomplete). Each town provided different reports in it’s annual publications, but they generally contain information on vital records (births, marriages and deaths) for the year of publication (not always included in early years), lists of public officials, lists of police officers, firemen, and other government workers, including school teachers. Don’t overlook the town’s expenditures list, as it often included payments made to town citizens for work they performed in the town’s behest. Also, many towns include payments made for the support of the indigent within the town.

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