Geography

Geographical Names of the Norwich VT Locality

Of the little settlements in the township of Norwich which seem to be existing in the sunset of their former glory, may be mentioned Beaver Meadow, or West Norwich. This place presents a notable instance of that decline in population and decay of business interests in a rural community, of which Vermont affords many examples …

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Map of part of North America from Cape Charles to the Mouth of the River Mississipi

Captain John Barnwell, otherwise known as Tuscarora Jack, was a well known frontier settler who was active in the 1711 Tuscarora War. His travels throughout the Southeast enabled him to draw a relatively accurate map of the area of his travels and exploration, some from second hand information, but most from first hand. For researchers of the Southeast this map is critical, and never before seen online in such a large form as to be able to read the hand writing and personal descriptions and historical details as outlined by Barnwell. In order to view this map in a form that made it legible you had to travel to one of the two locations the actual versions exist.

Map Making, from Majorca to Appalachia

From the moment that Europeans learned that a New World existed across the waters of the Atlantic, map makers in Western Europe began turning maps of that New World. At first these maps were grossly inaccurate and assumed the either the Americas were part of the Orient or merely consisted of islands off the shores of Asia. As more and more log books and navigation charts were returned to Spain, Portugal, France and England by explorers, the maps grew more precise.

John Mitchell’s Map

The Mitchell Map remained the most detailed map of North America available in the later eighteenth century. Various impressions (and also French copies) were directly used to help establish the boundaries of the new United States of America by diplomats at the Treaty of Paris (1783) that ended the American Revolutionary War. The map’s inaccuracies …

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A Geospatial Analysis

As stated in Part Three, the Stratum Unlimited, LLC report in 2001 (Other Missing Stone Archaeological Sites) virtually ignored the Native American communities in northern Georgia. Almost all were contemporary with the occupation of the Track Rock Terraces. This omission was particularly inexcusable for the town sites that were adjacent to the two creeks, which …

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The Southern Longleaf Pine Tree

The 160 mile long Shenandoah Valley is located in northwestern Virginia and the eastern panhandle of West Virginia. Ten counties are located in this famous valley. They are (south to north) Rockbridge, Augusta, Rockingham, Page, Shenandoah, Warren, Frederick and Clarke Counties in Virginia, plus Berkeley and Jefferson Counties in West Virginia. The main Shenandoah River …

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Elahsa

Elahsa (‘village of the great willows’). A former Hidatsa village on the north bank of Knife River, North Dakota, about 3 miles from Missouri River. Alternate Spellings: Biddahtsi-Awatiss – Maxmillian, Voy. dans l’int de l’Am. III, 3, 1843. Eláh-sá – Maxmillian, Trav., 178, 1843. Hidatsa – Matthews, Ethnog. Hidatsa, 38, 1877.

Aucocisco

The name of the territory about Casco Bay and Presumpscot River, in the area now included in Cumberland County, Maine. It was also sometimes applied to those Abnaki Indians by whom it was occupied. Since the section was settled at an early date by the whites, the name soon dropped out of use as applied …

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Kosotshe

Kosotshe. A former village of the Tututni, identified by Dorsey with the Luckkarso nation of Lewis and Clark, who placed them on the Oregon coast south of the Kusan territory in 1805, and estimated their population at 1,200.  Fifty years later Kautz said their village was on Flores Creek, Oregon. Dorsey fixed their habitat north …

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Guacata

Guacata – An inland Calusa village on Lake “Mayaimi” or Okechobee, south Florida, about 1570. Elsewhere in his memoir Fontaneda refers to it as a distinct but subordinate tribe. 1Hodge, Handbook of American Indians, 508, 1907. Guacata, Cuacata – In one place Fontaneda speaks of this as a town on Lake Mayaimi (Okeechobee) and elsewhere …

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Incha Tribe

Incha. An unidentified tribe said to have lived where there were Spanish settlements and to have been at war with the Mantons (Mento) of Arkansas River in 1700. 1Hodge, Handbook of American Indians, 604, 1905. Alternate Spellings: Icca – Iberville (1702) in Margry, Déc., IV, 561, 1880. Incha – Ibid., 599.   Footnotes:   [ + ] …

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Itomapa Tribe

Itomapa. Mentioned by Martin 1Hist. La., i, 252, 1820 as a tribe, on the west side of the lower Mississippi, which sent a deputation to the village of the Acolapissa in 1717 to meet Bienville. Consult: Ibitoupa Tribe Footnotes:   [ + ] 1. ↩ Hist. La., i, 252, 1820

Inchi

Inchi (In′tci, ‘stone lodge’). A village occupied by the Kansa in their migration up Kansas River. J. O. Dorsey, inf’n, 1882. 1Hodge, Handbook of American Indians, 604, 1905. Footnotes:   [ + ] 1. ↩ Hodge, Handbook of American Indians, 604, 1905.

Indian Villages, Towns and Settlements of Wisconsin

These pages will provide an alphabetical listing for all the villages, towns, and settlements in what was the state of Wisconsin at the time the Handbook of American Indian of North America was written. Calumet. A former Menominee village on the east shore of Lake Winnebago, Wisconsin, with 150 inhabitants in 1817. Starrow in Wis. …

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