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A Genealogy of the Lake Family

A genealogy of the Lake family of Great Egg Harbour in Old Gloucester County in New Jersey : descended from John Lade of Gravesend, Long Island; with notes on the Gravesend and Staten Island branches of the family. This volume of nearly 400 pages includes a coat-of-arms in colors, two charts, and nearly fifty full page illustrations – portraits, old homes, samplers, etc. The coat-of-arms shown in the frontspiece is an unusually good example of the heraldic art!

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1914 Eastern Shawnee Census

The 1914 census record of the Eastern Shawnee Tribe from the Quapaw Agency was taken on June 30, 1914, in Indian Territory, which is now Oklahoma. The Eastern Shawnee Tribe primarily resides in northeastern Oklahoma, having separated from other Shawnee groups in the 19th century to establish their community in this region. Recognized as a federally recognized tribe, the Eastern Shawnee have their own government and tribal structure. The purpose of the 1914 census was to maintain an official record of the Eastern Shawnee Tribe members as part of the U.S. government’s broader efforts to document Native American populations. This census provides detailed information about individual tribe members, including their names, ages, sex, family relationships, allotment numbers, and roll numbers.

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Treaty of August 24, 1835

Treaty with the Comanche and Witchetaw Indians and their associated Bands. For the purpose of establishing and perpetuating peace and friendship between the United States of America and the Comanche and Witchetaw nations, and their associated bands or tribes of Indians, and between these nations or tribes, and the Cherokee, Muscogee, Choctaw, Osage, Seneca and

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Records of the Malone Methodist Episcopal Church at Madison MD, 1883-1893

This ledger contains the church record of the Madison Circuit of the Delaware Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, which was an African American church in Dorchester County Maryland that included Malone Church. While the Malone Church member lists, probationer lists, and minutes date between 1883 and 1939, the Madison Circuit baptismal and marriage records date between 1883 and 1893. These records include significant information about church members including places of residence and parent names.

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Wilson and Allied Families: Billew, Britton, Du Bois, Longshore, Polhemus, Stillwell, Suebering

William Wilson, the pioneer ancestor of this family, emigrated from Stewardstown, County of Tyrone, Ireland, in 1732, when 19 years of age. The Town of Stewardstown is in the parish of Donagheny in the province of Ulster and eighty-two miles northwest of Dublin, long noted for its very superior linen cloth.

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Brown Genealogy

In 1895, Cyrus Henry Brown began collecting family records of the Brown family, initially with the intention of only going back to his great-grandfathers. As others became interested in the project, they decided to trace the family lineage back to Thomas Brown and his wife Mary Newhall, both born in the early 1600s in Lynn, Massachusetts. Thomas, John, and Eleazer, three of their sons, later moved to Stonington, Connecticut around 1688. When North Stonington was established in 1807, the three brothers were living in the southern part of the town. Wheeler’s “History of Stonington” contains 400 records of early descendants of the Brown family, taken from the town records of Stonington. However, many others remain unidentified, as they are not recorded in the Stonington town records. For around a century, the descendants of the three brothers lived in Stonington before eventually migrating to other towns in Connecticut and New York State, which was then mostly undeveloped. He would eventually write this second volume of his Brown Genealogy adding to and correcting the previous edition. This book is free to search, read, and/or download.

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Canton Asylum, 1910, List of Patients

In 1898, Congress passed a bill creating the only ‘Institution for Insane Indians’ in the United States. The Canton Indian Insane Asylum, South Dakota (sometimes called Hiawatha Insane Asylum) opened for the reception of patients in January, 1903. Many of the inmates were not mentally ill. Native Americans risked being confined in the asylum for

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