Records of the Malone Methodist Episcopal Church at Madison MD, 1883-1893

Title:Marriage and Baptism Records, Malone Methodist Episcopal Church, Madison, Dorchester County, Maryland, 1883-1893
Author:Donna Messick
Publication date:2003 
Publisher:Salisbury University Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture
Digitizing Sponsor:Salisbury University Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture
Contributor:Salisbury University Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture
Repository:Internet Archive
Marriage and Baptism Records, Malone Methodist Episcopal Church, Madison, Dorchester County, Maryland, 1883-1893
The Church Record of the Methodist-Episcopal Church at Madison Maryland

The Church Register from the Malone Methodist Episcopal Church in Madison (formerly known as Tobacco Stick”), Dorchester County, Maryland was discovered in 2003 when city workers in Salisbury, Maryland were tearing down an abandoned house. Recognizing it as an important piece of local history, William T. Holland, the Director of Salisbury Department of Building, Housing and Zoning donated it to the Nabb Center to be preserved. Unfortunately, as can be seen by picture, the register had gotten wet and its overall condition had suffered over the years. However, most of the entries are legible, even though the spelling of names may be varied as was common in the period.

Malone Methodist-Episcopal Church as it appeared in 1981 - Maryland Historical Trust D-596 February 1981
Malone Methodist-Episcopal Church as it appeared in 1981

Included in the register are pastors, official members and probationers, along with the baptisms and marriages that were performed along the circuit by the pastors. The register covers congregation activity mainly during the period between the 1880s and early 1890s. There are a few scattered entries from 1930. This transcription lists only the marriages (sorted by both male and female surnames) and baptisms.

The Malone ME Church was part of the Madison Circuit, Dover District, of the Delaware Conference of Methodist Episcopal Churches. The current church was built in 1890/93 on White Marsh Road in Madison; an earlier building preceded it. The original black congregants were mainly engaged in the seafood industry, either working on the water or in seafood packing.

According to local, historical researchers John Creighton and Pat Lewis, the church was named for Jeremiah Malone, a free black man who deeded the property to the congregation in 1864. Malone had been a slave belonging to Thomas Jones and then his son, James, who gave Malone to Reuben Tall, who freed him in 1836. One of the original trustees of the church was David Linthicum who was married to a relative of Harriet Tubman. The church and the adjacent cemetery have several ties to the Tubman family.

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Notes About the Book

  • The original had water stains, tears, and faded ink.
  • This is a transcript of the original. Please see the original housed at the Salisbury University Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture for verification.

Surnames

Armstrong, Bailey, Baily, Bennett, Bishop, Brown, Bryan, Bryant, Camper, Cepher, Chester, Clash, Cornelius, Cornish, Cromal, Crumble, Curn, Dean, Dickerson, Donnic, Donnie, Dorsey, Dunnock, Eles, Ellus, Ennils, Gilbert, Green, Griffin, Henry, Henson, Hooper, Jackson, Jefferson, Jenefer, Jenkins, Johnson, Keen, Keene, King, Lane, Langle, LeCount, LeCoupmpt, Linthicum, Macer, Manokey, Matney, McCready, Meekins, Mister, Mondon, Moses, Opher, Parmer, Pinder, Prichett, Rankins, Ross, sanders, Seamer, Seamore, Slacum, Spedder, Spicer, Stafford, Stanley, Stubs, Tilghman, Tilman, Todd, Travers, Victor, Vinsent, Ward, Washington, Waters, Wheatley, Wilson, and Woolford.


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