Surname: Polk

1st Mississippi Light Artillery

Aka Withers’ Light Artillery Company A — Ridley’s Battery, aka Jackson Light Artillery (raised in Hinds & Madison Counties, MS) Company B — Herrod’s Battery, aka Vaughan Rebels (raised in Yazoo County, MS) Company C — Turner’s Battery (raised in Choctaw County, MS) Company D — Wofford’s Battery (raised in Holmes County, MS) Company E — Carroll Light Artillery (raised in Carroll County, MS) Company F — Bradford’s Battery (raised in Lawrence County, MS) Company G — Cowan’s Battery (raised in Warren County, MS) Company H — Connor Battery (raised in Adams County, MS) Company I — Bowman’s Battery (raised

Weymouth ways and Weymouth people

Weymouth ways and Weymouth people

Edward Hunt’s “Weymouth ways and Weymouth people: Reminiscences” takes the reader back in Weymouth Massachusetts past to the 1830s through the 1880s as he provides glimpses into the people of the community. These reminiscences were mostly printed in the Weymouth Gazette and provide a fair example of early New England village life as it occurred in the mid 1800s. Of specific interest to the genealogist will be the Hunt material scattered throughout, but most specifically 286-295, and of course, those lucky enough to have had somebody “remembered” by Edward.

Surrender of Santa Anna

Governor Houston at His Trading Post on the Verdigris

In February, 1828, the vanguard of Creek immigrants arrived at the Creek Agency on the Verdigris, in charge of Colonel Brearley, and they and the following members of the McIntosh party were located on a section of land that the Government promised in the treaty of 1826 to purchase for them. By the treaty of May 6, 1828, the Government assigned the Cherokee a great tract of land, to which they at once began to remove from their homes in Arkansas. The movement had been under way for some months when there appeared among the Indians the remarkable figure of Samuel Houston. The biographers of Houston have told the world next to nothing of his sojourn of three or four years in the Indian country, an interesting period when he was changing the entire course of his life and preparing for the part he was to play in the drama of Texas.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties New York

Portrait and Biographical Record of Seneca and Schuyler Counties, NY

In this volume will be found a record of many whose lives are worthy the imitation of coming generations. It tells how some, commencing life in poverty, by industry and economy have accumulated wealth. It tells how others, with limited advantages for securing an education, have become learned men and women, with an influence extending throughout the length and breadth of the land. It tells of men who have risen from the lower walks of life to eminence as statesmen, and whose names have become famous. It tells of those in every walk in life who have striven to succeed,

Biographical Sketch of Ezekiel Polk

Ezekiel Polk, one of the older brothers of Colonel Thomas Polk, was the first clerk of the county court of Lincoln, after its separation from Mecklenburg in 1768; a Magistrate of Mecklenburg county at a later period; and was a man of considerable wealth and influence, owning much of the valuable lands around “Morrow’s Turnout,” now the flourishing village of “Pineville.” He was the grandfather of James K. Polk, President of the United States in 1845, some of whose noblest traits of character were illustrated in “refusing to serve a second term” and in being “never absent from his post

Biography of Thomas Polk

Thomas Polk is a name of historic distinction in North Carolina, as well as in our nation. He was the early, constant, and enduring friend of liberty, and the unfaltering opponent of arbitrary power and oppression. He was a member of the Colonial Assembly in 1771 and 1775, associated with Abraham Alexander from Mecklenburg. In 1775, he was appointed Colonel of the second battalion of “Minute Men,” with Adam Alexander as Colonel, and Charles McLean as Major. As Colonel of the Mecklenburg militia, he issued orders to the Captains of the several “beats”, or districts, to send two delegates each

Biography of President James K. Polk

James Knox Polk, son of Samuel Polk, and grandson of Ezekiel Polk, was born on the 2nd of November, 1793 about eleven miles south of Charlotte, on the Camden road, on a plantation which, at his father’s removal to Tennessee in 1806, became the property of Nathan Orr, and finally that of the late James Hennigan, Esq. The house in which James K. Polk was born, stood about two hundred yards south of the present crossing place of Little Sugar Creek, and about one hundred yards to the right of the public road in passing from Charlotte. The lingering signs

Polk, Opal Laverne – Obituary

North Powder, Oregon Opal Laverne Polk, 80, of Vancouver, Wash., and formerly of North Powder died June 8. Evergreen Memorial Gardens Funeral Chapel was in charge of arrangements. Mrs. Polk was born July 15, 1925, to Mary and Jacob Simonis in North Powder. She married Perry Polk who died earlier. Survivors include children and their spouses, Betty and John Sneddon of Vancouver, Linda Sill and her fiance Bob Turkington of Anchorage, Alaska, and David and Margaret Polk of Longview, Wash.; six grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. The Observer Online, Obituaries for the week ending June 24, 2006, Published, June 26, 2006