Surname: Patrick

Watson Coat of arms

Descendants of Matthew Watson of Leicester, Massachusetts

Matthew Watson (d. 1720), of English lineage, married Mary Orr in 1695, and in 1718 the family immigrated from Ireland to Boston, Massachusetts and settled in Leicester, Massachusetts. Descendants and relatives lived in New England, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Nebraska, Rhode Island, California, Nevada, Michigan and elsewhere. Includes Watson, Armington, Bemis, Denny, Draper, Kent, Washburn, Bailey, Barnard, Belcher, Bent, Biscoe, Bolles, Breckenridge, Bright, Browning, Bryant, Bullock, Burrage, Dennis, Fisher, Foster, Green, Hayward, Hobbs, Hodgkins, Holman, Howard, Jenks, Jones, Kellogg, Kitchell, Knight, Lazelle, Livermore, Loring, Mason, Maynard, Munger, Patrick, Prouty, Remington, Reed, Rice, Richardson, Rogers, Sadler, Sibley, Snow, Sprague, Stone, Studley, Symonds, Taitt, Thomas, Thompson, Trask, Tucker, Waite, Webster, Westcott, Wheeler, Whittermore, Wilson, Woods and related families.

Enemy Alien Registration Affidavit for Bernhardt Vick - Cropped Photo

Kansas Registrations of Enemy Aliens, 1917 – 1921

The series contains original affidavits of registration that record personal information about each registrant, their photograph affixed to the majority of documents, and the registrants fingerprints. All of these are specific to Kansas, and most have the actual documents attached.

Title Page for Biographical and Portrait Cyclopedia of Chester County Pennsylvania

Biographical and Portrait Cyclopedia of Chester County, PA

Biographical and Portrait Cyclopedia of Chester County, Pennsylvania – comprising a historical sketch of the county, by Samuel T. Wiley, together with more than five hundred biographical sketches of the prominent men and leading citizens of the county.

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Hardships of the Early Natchez Emigrants

Taking the reader with us, to the settlements of the distant Natchez region, he will find that emigrants continued to pour in, upon those fertile hills and alluvial bottoms, from all parts of “his majesty’s Atlantic plantations.” Many were the hardships and perils they encountered, in reaching this remote and comparatively uninhabited region. It is believed that the history of one party of these emigrants will enable the reader to understand what kind of hardships and deprivations all the others were forced to undergo. Major General Phineas Lyman, a native of Durham, a graduate of Yale, a distinguished lawyer, and

1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B.

Biographical Sketch of Albert G. Patrick

Albert G. Patrick, of Jefferson and Calhoun counties, Kansas, was one of the free-state leaders and, although he finally died full of years and honor, had a most narrow escape from death in the most exciting period of the border troubles. He was an Indiana native, born at Salem, Washington County, in 1824, and a settler at Leavenworth, February 18, 1856. He wrote an account of the robbery and stuffing of the ballot box in the Currler-Beck contest for a seat in the Council, which was published in an Indiana paper and aroused the men of the town. In the

Biography of Joseph J. Patrick

Joseph J. Patrick, filling the office of County clerk, was born in Milwaukee County, Wisconsin, May 3, 1882, a son of John and Marie (Mealy) Patrick. The father was born in Waterford, Racine County, February 8, 1857, and was a son of Joseph Patrick, a stonemason by trade, who came to this country at an early period in its development, working at his trade here until called to his final rest, at the age of sixty-five years. John Patrick was reared in this County and has made farming his life work. He wedded Mary Mealy, who was born in Dover

Biography of William Patrick

William Patrick, Sheriff of the united counties of Leeds and Grenville, is of Scotch descent, his grandparents being on their way through Massachusetts to Canada, when his father, Asa Patrick, was born. The family settled near Newmarket, Upper Canada, opening a farm there. In the war of 1812-15, Asa Patrick was connected with the Commissary Department, with head-quarters at Toronto. William was born in “Little York,” now Toronto, February 21, 1810, the maiden name of his mother being Belinda Gilbert. He was educated by Dr., since Bishop Strachan, then Rector, and the Principal of the grammar school at Toronto; there

Richard Lewis Patrick

1st Class Private, 118th F. A., 31st Div., Btry. B. Born in Lenoir County; the son of George Lane and Mrs. Katherine Lewis Patrick. Entered the service May 18, 1918, at Wilson, N.C. Was sent to Camp Jackson, S. C., and from there to Camp Mills. Sailed for France Oct. 21, 1918. Returned to USA Dec. 21, 1918, and was mustered out at Camp Gordon, Ga., Jan. 9, 1919.