Holmes

Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities Read More »

Ancestry of Herbert Isam Mitchell of Brockton, MA

The family bearing the name of Mitchell is one of the oldest in the New World, its progenitor being Experience Mitchell, who came over in 1623 in the “Ann,” and from that time to the present the records of various towns of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, chiefly Plymouth, Duxbury and the Bridgewaters, bear mute testimony of the prominence in peace and war of the members of the family in the different generations, and the present head of the family in Brockton, Isam Mitchell, president of Isam Mitchell & Co., lumber dealers and contractors, and his son, the late Herbert Isam Mitchell, active in business with his father and prominent in fraternal circles, have proved themselves firm in purpose and able in business.

Ancestry of Herbert Isam Mitchell of Brockton, MA Read More »

Muster Roll of Captain Samuel Burrell’s Company

Muster Roll of Captain Samuel Burrell’s Company of Infantry in Detachment of drafted Militia of Maine, called into actual service the State, for the protection of its Northeastern Frontier, from twenty-fifth day of February, 1839, the time of its rendezvous Augusta, Maine, to the nineteenth day of April, 1839, when discharged or mustered.

Muster Roll of Captain Samuel Burrell’s Company Read More »

St. Charles County’s Participation in the World War

Soon after World War 1 localities across the country wished to honor the men and women who had served the Nation from their locality. St. Charles County, Missouri, is one of these counties. This manuscript isn’t limited to just the men who fought overseas, it also includes the women who had participated via Red Cross and the men who had actively served in the various campaigns backing the War here at home.

St. Charles County’s Participation in the World War Read More »

Descendants of Benjamin S. Atwood of Whitman, MA

Benjamin S. Atwood, the well-known box manufacturer of Whitman, Mass., was one of the best known men in Plymouth county, and as a business man and as a soldier stood high in the estimation of all who know him. He was born in the town of Carver, Plymouth county, June 25, 1840. The Atwood family of which Benjamin S. Atwood is a descendant is an old and prominent family of Plymouth Colony. The founder was John Wood, who came to Plymouth in 1643, and was later known as John Atwood – a spelling of the name that has been retained to the present time.

Descendants of Benjamin S. Atwood of Whitman, MA Read More »

The Osage Massacre

When the treaty council with the Osage at Fort Gibson broke up in disagreement on April 2, 1833, three hundred Osage warriors under the leadership of Clermont departed for the west to attack the Kiowa. It was Clermont’s boast that he never made war on the whites and never made peace with his Indian enemies. At the Salt Plains where the Indians obtained their salt, within what is now Woodward County, Oklahoma, they fell upon the trail of a large party of Kiowa warriors going northeast toward the Osage towns above Clermont’s. The Osage immediately adapted their course to that pursued by their enemies following it back to what they knew would be the defenseless village of women, children, and old men left behind by the warriors. The objects of their cruel vengeance were camped at the mouth of Rainy-Mountain Creek, a southern tributary of the Washita, within the present limits of the reservation at Fort Sill.

The Osage Massacre Read More »

Ancestors of Samuel Pearly Gates of Bridgewater Massachusetts

Samuel Pearly Gates, of Bridgewater, probably best known in the business world as treasurer of the Eagle Cotton Gin Company, in which he holds the controlling interest, has been so intimately identified with the expansion of the various activities of that place during the fifty odd years of his residence there that he is justly ranked among the leaders in the development of manufacturing, banking and civic interests. Though well past the three-score and ten mark his faculties are undimmed, his energy unabated, his zeal unflagging, and he not only keeps pace with the times but is still in the van in the matter of progress in any line which enlists his attention or sympathy. Bridgewater is the home of his adoption, however, for he was born at Ashby, in Middlesex county, this State, and is a descendant of a family which has been settled in that county from early Colonial days. We herewith give the following records concerning the family since the emigrant ancestor landed this side of the Atlantic.

Ancestors of Samuel Pearly Gates of Bridgewater Massachusetts Read More »

Ancestors of Charles Presbery White of Taunton Massachusetts

There is nothing definite known concerning the birth of Nicholas White, but there is no doubt that he belonged to the yeomanry of England. He was a freeman in Dorchester, Mass., in 1643, and about the same time married Susanna, daughter of Jonas and Frances Humphrey, who had also settled in Dorchester. At this time

Ancestors of Charles Presbery White of Taunton Massachusetts Read More »

Bentleysville

Bentleysville was a rural community of three hundred persons in southwestern Pennsylvania in 1868. It had grown around a mill that Sheshbazzar Bentley Junior and Senior operated on the southern branch of Pigeon Creek. Its history is short because as a country village it existed less than a century. The events are substantially in chronological order, beginning with the settlers over the mountains in 1750 and ending after the Centennial in 1916.

Bentleysville Read More »

Captain Stewart, G. M. D. No. 655, Lagrange District

Captain Stewart, G. M. D. No. 655, Lagrange District Adams, Absalom Adams, James M. Allums, Britton Amoss, James Barnes, William Bays, John R. Bays, Moses Bays, Nathaniel Boman, Isham Boman, Larkin Boman, Levi Boman, Robert Boman, William Brooks, Isaac R. Brooks, John Brooks, William Burson, Isaac C. Butler, Whitaker Cardwell, William Collum, James Crawley, Bird

Captain Stewart, G. M. D. No. 655, Lagrange District Read More »

Mission’s Among the Southern Indians

In the year 1819 the Synod of South Carolina resolved to establish a mission among the Southern Indians east of the Mississippi river. The Cherokees, Muskogee’s, Seminoles, Choctaws and Chickasaws then occupied Georgia, Florida, Alabama and Mississippi. Rev. David Humphries offered to take charge of the intended mission. He was directed to visit the Indians,

Mission’s Among the Southern Indians Read More »

Scroll to Top