Surname: Hancock

Nelson Sherman

Ancestors of Nelson Sherman of Carver and Brockton, Massachusetts

Nelson Sherman, who was for many years extensively engaged in agricultural pursuits in the town of Carver, Mass., and is now making his home in the city of Brockton, is regarded as one of the substantial men of Plymouth county. He is a descendant of several of this Commonwealth’s earliest settled and most prominent families, and was born March 14, 1841, in North Carver, son of Henry and Christinai (Crocker) Sherman.

Descendants of Leonard Crocker Couch of Taunton MA

COUCH (Taunton family). The family bearing this name at Taunton whose representative head is now Leonard Crocker Couch, Esq., who since boyhood has been a resident of the city, occupied in mechanical and business lines, and for years one of the substantial men and useful citizens of the community, is one of long and honorable standing in the neighboring State of Connecticut and of distinction in our country. And through its Taunton alliance of a generation ago – that of Maj. Gen. Darius Nash Couch, of Civil war fame, the father of the present Leonard Crocker Couch just alluded to

Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Tupman Cemetery, Columbia, Kentucky

Cemetery transcription of the Tupman Cemetery near Columbia Kentucky. Tupman’s cemetery is located on a side road leading from Pelley Lane on the Ballou Farm, near Columbia, Kentucky

Gen. Daniel Bean and Wife

Bean and Bane Family Genealogy of Saco Valley Maine

Tradition makes the ancestor of this family who first came to our shores a native of the Isle of Jersey, but I doubt the truth of the statement. I have not found the name, or one resembling it, in any record or book relating to Jersey. The surname Bain, and Bane, are derived from the Gaelic word bane which signified white or fair complexion, as Donald Bane, who usurped the Scottish throne after the death of his brother, Malcolm Canmore. An ancient branch of the family in Fifeshire, Scotland, have spelled the surname Bayne. The Highland MacBanes were a branch

Atkinson Family Genealogy of Saco Valley

The Atkinsons were English, and the ancestors of the New England families came from Bury, in County Lancaster, in 1634. Theodore Atkinson, the emigrant, settled in Boston and was owner of a good estate there. Atkinson street, where he had land, was named for him, and Berry street, for the place of his nativity. Hon. Theodore Atkinson, a grandson, settled on Great island, in Portsmouth harbor, and engaged in trade and fishing. He was appointed clerk of the Superior Court of Judicature for the province; was a man of great fidelity, held in high esteem. John Atkinson, son of the

Gleanings from English Records about New England Families

Gleanings from English Records about New England Families

The classic work often cited by more contemporaneous authors on early New England families and the records of them found within the Principal Probate Registry, Somerset House, Strand, the Public Record Office, Fetter Lane, and the British Museum, Bloomsbury, while on a visit in London during the summer and fall of 1879.

1899 Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts Directory Cover

1899 Directory for Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts

Resident and business directory of Middleboro’ and Lakeville, Massachusetts, for 1899. Containing a complete resident, street and business directory, town officers, schools, societies, churches, post offices, notable events in American history, etc. Compiled and published by A. E. Foss & Co., Needham, Massachusetts. The following is an example of what you will find within the images of the directory: Sheedy John, laborer, bds. J. G. Norris’, 35 West Sheehan John B., grocery and variety store, 38 West, h. do. Sheehan Lizzie O., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Lucy G. B., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main

Rebecca Mitchell Proctor Grave Marker

Bethany Baptist Church Cemetery Graham Indiana

This is an historical transcription of Bethany Baptist Church Cemetery, Graham, Jefferson County, Indiana which was transcribed in 1941 as part of the DAR cemetery transcription project. The value of this transcription is that in many cases they transcribed headstones which may today no longer exist. Had it not been for this project these records may have been lost due to the natural regression of cemeteries. Many of the cemeteries may be known by a different name today, we use the name they were identified as in 1941. Arbuckle, J. N., 07 Aug 1837 – 10 Dec 1882 Boyd, Robert

At the Sand Creek Massacre

General History of the Western Indian Tribes 1851-1870 – Indian Wars

Up to 1851, the immense uninhabited plains east of the Rocky Mountains were admitted to be Indian Territory, and numerous tribes roamed from Texas and Mexico to the Northern boundary of the United States. Then came the discovery of gold in California, drawing a tide of emigration across this wide reservation, and it became necessary, by treaty with the Indians, to secure a broad highway to the Pacific shore. By these treaties the Indians were restricted to certain limits, but with the privilege of ranging, for hunting purposes, over the belt thus re-reserved as a route of travel.

Treaty of October 11, 1842

Treaty of October 11, 1842

1842, October 11. Treaty with the Confederated tribes of Sauk and Fox at the agency of the Sauk and Fox Indians in the Territory of Iowa. Schedule of debts annexed. Resolution of Senate, February 15, 1843. Ratification of President, March 23, 1843. The confederated tribes of Sacs and Foxes cede to the U. S. all the lands W. of the Mississippi river to which they have any claim or title. The Indians reserve a right to occupy for three years from the signing of this treaty all that part of the land above ceded which lies W. of a line running due N. and S. from the painted or red rocks on the White Breast fork of the Des Moines river, which rocks will be found about 8 miles in a straight line from the junction of the White Breast with the Des Moines. Upon ratification of this treaty the U. S. agree to assign a tract of land suitable and convenient for Indian purposes to the Sacs and Foxes for a permanent home for them and their descendants, which tract shall be upon the Missouri river or some of its waters.

Biographical Sketch of W. H. Hancock

W. H. Hancock, who is one of the most successful broom-corn brokers and business men of Tuscola, was born in Chicago, March 29, 1864, and is a son of W. S. and Sarah (Bell) Hancock. His father was born in Oxford, Ohio, and his mother in Mifflintown, Pennsylvania. His father is now living a retired life in Chicago. W. H. Hancock was raised to manhood in Chicago and educated in the Cook County normal school. His first position of any importance was that of conductor on the Pullman car lines, and he continued as such for seven years, running over

Biographical Sketch of J. J. Hancock

J.J. Hancock, tobacco dealer, was born in England in 1830; came to America in 1851, and located at London, Canada; removed to Buffalo, N.Y., in 1853, and engaged in the boot and shoe business. He removed to Dubuque, Ia., in 1858; thence to Sioux Falls, South Dakota in 1871, where he resumed the boot and shoe business. In 1878 he was in the employ of the American Express Company. In 1879 he located in Missouri Valley.

Biography of Robert M. Hancock

ROBERT M. HANCOCK. It is a pleasure and a privilege to record the character and enterprise of men of business who have made their own way in life, and no more efficient man could have been found for the office of circuit and county clerk than Robert M. Hancock. He is keenly alive to his responsibilities, fulfills them in the most prompt and thorough manner, and even his political enemies have come to understand that he is the “right man in the right place.” He owes his nativity to Coffee County, Tennessee, where he was born February 11, 1847, a

Biographical Sketch of William Hancock

William Hancock was a pioneer of both Kentucky and Missouri. In the former State he helped to fight the Indians and guard the forts, and experienced the dangers and privations of those times. He came to Missouri among the first Americans who sought homes here, and was the first settler on the Missouri river bottom, in Warren County, which has since borne his name. He was married in St. Charles County to a Miss McClain, by whom he had three children, two daughters awl a son named William, Jr. The latter died at home, unmarried. One of the daughters, named

Biography of W. M. Hancock

One of the representative agriculturists in Nowata county is W. M. Hancock, who is residing on a ranch five and one-half miles southeast of Lenapah. He was born in Lebanon, Missouri, on the 8th of December, 1860, and received his education in the common schools of Jasper county, putting his textbooks aside at the age of eighteen years. He then engaged in farming with his father, E. H. Hancock, who was a native of Randolph county, North Carolina, removed to Laclede county, Missouri, in 1857, and subsequently to Jasper county in 1866. In 1881 he came to Oklahoma, then Indian

Hancock, Robert – Obituary

Formerly of Cove 1921-2004 Robert Brooks Hancock, 82, of York, Mont., and formerly of Cove died June 1 at St. Peter’s Hospital in Helena, Mont. Burial was at Montana State Veterans Cemetery at Fort Harrison, Mont. Mr. Hancock was born Dec. 10, 1921, to Charles and Brooks George Hancock on the family farm near Cove. He graduated from Cove High School and served in the South Pacific for the Navy during World War II. In 1945 he married Jean Horner. The couple lived in Missoula, Mont., where he worked at Westmont Tractor and for Missoula Cartage. After his wife’s death,

Joseph Hancock

Private, 1st Class, Co. M, Inf., 30th Div., 120th Regt.; of Durham County; son of Will and Mrs. Sallie Hancock. Entered service Feb. 1, 1915, at Durham, N.C. Sent to Camp Sevier, Greenville, S. C., Aug. 15, 1917. Sailed for France May 17, 1918. Was in three different hospitals in France. Wounded Somme, near St. Quentin Sept. 29th, by high explosive shell lost rig,ht leg, four toes off left foot, compound fracture, three ribs right side, compound fracture right arm near wrist, flesh wound in left leg above knee. Was on Mexican border nine months. Returned to USA Dec. 30,

Ellen Direxia Todd Meeusker Hancock

MEEUSKER HANCOCK, Ellen Direxia Todd8, (Augustus V.7, Eli6, Solomon5, James4, James3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Sept. 4, 1862, married first, Ernest Meeusker, second, William Hancock. Children: I. Grey, m. Cora McClennehan. II. Harley.