Genealogy

Cleland Cousins

From time to time, Clelands of County Down have come to America and settled permanently, establishing American branches of this ancient family whose roots reach down through several centuries. There are also a number of Cleland families in this country whose original immigrant ancestor came directly from Scotland, some of these coming at an earlier …

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A history of George Summers of Douglass and Lower Dublin townships, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

George Summers, progenitor of one of the Summers Families in America, was born in Germany shortly after the year 1690, and arrived in this country on the 22nd ot September in the year of 1752, landing at Philadelphia on the ship “Brothers, in charge of Captain Wm. Muir. He was married to Elizabeth . They had six sons and one daughter, namely Philip, Henry, John, Martin, George, Peter and Margaretha Elizabeth. Two of them, Philip and Henry, however, did not come over with their father but arrived two years later, September 30th, 1754 on the ship “Edinburg also landing at Philadelphia.

One Hundred Years of the Moravians in Mayodan, North Carolina 1896-1996

100 years of history of the Moravian Church and it’s members of Mayodan, North Carolina. The Moravian Church of Mayodan, North Carolina, Rockingham County was dedicated to the Glory of God on November 29, 1896. The first religious service held in the village in July 1895, under the trees near where the Church stands was the actual beginning of the Church. Howard Edward Rondthaler (now Bishop-Moravian Church Southern Province) a surveyor at the time living at the boarding house and Samuel Permania Tesh, who was also staying there, both Moravians from Winston-Salem, conducted this service. The Higgins family, who kept the boarding house, the other boarders there and a few people from the village gathered around as the service progressed. Howard Rondthaler, son of Edward Rondthaler, Bishop also of the Moravian Church, studied for the ministry and became the first pastor of the Mayodan Moravian Church.

History of the John Wilson Family

John Wilson has entered into his rest after an eventful life of eighty-one years, that begun in Ayrshire, Scotland, on August 16, 1811, and ended in Iowa May 21, 1892. He came to the United States in 1851 with the home-seeking immigrants that were attracted by the mild laws and new lands of the great republic. He was a representative of the Scotch covenanters that had struggled for religious and civic liberty for many generations and held aloof from participation in governmental, affairs on account of dissatisfaction with church settlements. When a young man he wanted to come to the United States and was prevented by his mother, who could not endure the thought at that time. This is his and his descendants stories, 4 generations deep!

The Wilson Family of West Virginia

This brief history has been gleaned from old family records, correspondence with other members, and histories of Ritchie, Barbour, Harrison and Randolph Counties, West Virginia. The first known ancestor was David Wilson, who was born in Scotland about 1650; he had a son David, born about 1685, who was forced to flee from Scotland to Ireland owing to his being on the losing side in the Scotch Rebellion of 1715. His son William (b. Nov. 19, 1722; d. June 12, 1801) came to America about 1736; married Elizabeth Blackburn, also of Scotch-Irish descent, about 1746, and settled on Trout Run near Moorefield, Hardy County, W. Va. The Land Office at Richmond shows that he and his sons patented many tracts of land in what is now Hampshire, Hardy, and Grant Counties. Nothing further is known of him as to where he lived and died.

The Wilson Family, Somerset and Barter Hill Branch

In the preparation of “The Wilson family, Somerset and Barter Hill branch” I have discovered two lists of the names of the sons and daughters of Col. Ben and Ann Seay Wilson of “Somerset” in Cumberland County, Virginia, in addition to the list found in my father’s notes. None of these was arranged in the same chronological order. It was my good fortune in 1915 to find the Bible, claimed to be the Bible of Col. Ben and Ann Seay Wilson of “Somerset” in Cumberland County, Virginia. At that time this was in the hands of Miss Clementine Reid Wilson, Col. Ben’s great-granddaughter, and it was my privilege to copy, with the aid of a reading glass, for the ink was badly faded, the names of their children from that Bible in the same chronological order in which they were recorded. This chronological order, and military records found, support each other. I therefore believe that this sketch contains the most accurate chronological list of Col. Ben’s and Ann Seay Wilson’s children to be found outside of his Bible.

Notes on the Genealogy of the Bethel Vermont Wilson Family

Compiled by Harold F. Wilson, while in Bethel, Vermont, in August, 1948, and completed in his home in Pitman, New Jersey, November, 1948. Material from: (1) James J. Wilson family Bible, notes taken by H. F. W. while convalescing at the M. L. Wilson Homestead in Bethel; (2) conversations with H. F. W.’s Aunt, Miss Susan E. Wilson, and with his Uncle, John J. Wilson; (3) data from two scrapbooks of James J. Wilson at the home on North Main Street, Bethel, just north of Christ Church; (4) letter from Mrs, Jennie Wilson Dustin, of Randolph, Vt., Nov., 1948; (5) material from H. F. W.’s father’s Scrapbook (Guy Wilson’s); (6) data from Charles Knowles Bolton, Scotch-Irish Pioneers in Ulster and America (Boston, 1910); information from Charles A. Hanna, The Scotch-Irish, Vol. II (New York, 1902); also from Osgood, American Colonies in the 18th Century, Vol. III for the Scotch-Irish background, and from Robt. P. Tristram Coffin, The Kennebec, Cradle of Americans (New York, 1938), and from John Fiske, New France and New England (Boston, 1902) for the Merrymeeting Bay episode.

Wainwright and related families

These sketches were written primarily to trace the paternal ancestry of Mary Wainwright who was born in Somerset County, Maryland, May 11, 1818. She married, November 15, 1837, William Underwood Roberts. They became the parents of a family of six sons and five daughters, all of whom were born at Jesterville and lived to mature years. Mary Wainwright Roberts had, at the time of her death, October 11, 1904, at the age of eighty-six years, more than eighty living descendants. Her ancestry involves, besides her Wainwright forebears, the Cannons, the Bloyces, the Evanses, the Streets, the Rices, and others about whom something is said in this sketch, as well as several other ancient Somerset families.

The Waitley family in the United States

John S. Waitley is the earliest known ancestor of the Waitley name in the United States. According to this sketch, John S. Waitley was a native of Scotland. His parents came to America and settled in Massachusetts. Later his mother was lost at sea when on a return visit to Scotland. John S. Waitley married Lydia Bartlett, a daughter of Josiah Bartlett, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. He became a minister of the Free-will Baptist Church. He moved to Ashtabula County, Ohio, lived there several years and later moved to Canton, Ohio. He died in Knox County, Ohio, in 1868 at the age of 96. His wife died in 1858 in Knox County, Ohio. They had lived in Mt. Vernon most of the time.

Wakefield Kindred of America

Wakefield Kindred of America provides the genealogy of John Wakefield, the immigrant ancestor of the Boston Family, who was born in England in 1614-15. He was according to the best information at hand, a native of Gravesend, county Kent, England, as Thomas Wakefield, probably his brother, came from that town which was an ancient seat of this family.

Genealogical Record of Thomas Wait and his descendants

Genealogical Record of Thomas Wait and his descendants looks at the genealogy of Thomas Wait (1601-1677) who was from Wethersfield Parish, Essex, England. On his arrival in America, landing in Rhode Island, he applied for a lot on which to build,and was granted it on 7/1/1639. On 3/l6/l641 he became a Freeman in Newport R. I. He died in Portsmouth R. I., before April 1677 intestate. This Thomas Wait was a cousin to the Richard Waite of Watertown Mass., who was a large land owner. This unpublished manuscript provides the descendants of this family.

Andrews and Wakelee Families of Waterbury Connecticut 1650-1947

Andrews and Wakelee 1650-1947 manuscript provides a brief genealogy of the descendants of John and Mary Andruss of Hartford Connecticut through their son Abraham, one of the 30 original families of Mattatuck, afterward called Waterbury. The second part of the Andrews and Wakelee 1650-1947 manuscript provides the descendants of Henry and Sarah Wakelee of Hartford Connecticut, through their son Ebenezer, who also settled in Waterbury.

An account of Percival and Ellen Green and of some of their descendants

An account of Percival and Ellen Green and of some of their descendants includes nine generations of descendants for Percival and Ellen Green. Percival and Ellen were transported from London to New England aboard the Suzan and Ellin in 1635. They settled in Cambridge, Massachusetts Bay, and had several generations of descendants who resided there.

Beal Genealogy of Abington Massachusetts

The Beal family of Abington, the head of which was the late George A. Beal, Esq., who for years was one of the leading men of the town, prominent in business and public affairs and useful and substantial in citizenship, is one of long and honorable standing in this section of the Commonwealth and is a branch of the earlier Weymouth family, where early appeared the immigrant settler. By the marriage of the late Mr. Beal into the Reed family, his posterity is doubly descended from the Puritan stock of the early Colonial period of Massachusetts. There follows in chronological order from the immigrant settler, John Beal, the genealogy of the particular Abington family of Beals alluded to.

Lawton Genealogy of New Bedford Massachusetts

The branch of the Lawton family so long resident in New Bedford, and in each generation active in public affairs, but recently represented by the late Charles H. and Horace A. Lawton, well known druggists, the former long prominent in the government of the town and an important factor in the financial and commercial life, is descended from George Lawton, a brother of Thomas and possibly of John also, all of Newport as early as 1638 or 1639. George and Thomas were among the twenty-eight signers of the Compact, April 30, 1639, for the formation of a “civil body politicke.” George Lawton was made a freeman in 1655; member of the Court of Trials, 1648; deputy, 1665-72-75-76-79-80; assistant, 1680-81-82-83-84-85-86-89-90. He and five other assistants, with the deputy governor, wrote a letter to their Majesties, William and Mary, congratulating them on their accession to the Crown, and informing them that since the deposition of Governor Andros the former government under the charter had been resumed. He seems to have been prominent in all the Colonial affairs of his time. He died Oct. 5, 1693, and was buried in his orchard at Portsmouth. He married Elizabeth Hazard, daughter of Thomas and Martha Hazard.

Ancestry of William Bowers Moison Chace of Taunton Massachusetts

William Bowers Moison Chace, senior member of W. B. M. Chace & Co., real estate, insurance, stocks and bonds, prominently identified with manufacturing and financial concerns, his position won through his own energy, integrity and general worth, is a worthy representative of a family planted in America but a decade later than the landing of the Pilgrim Fathers. He was born in Somerset, Mass., Dec. 5, 1854, and is of the ninth generation of the family in the New World.

Ancestry of Nathaniel Reynolds Packard, 2d of Brockton Massachusetts

Nathaniel Reynolds Packard, 2d, who belonged to the older school of shoe manufacturers in Brockton, and whose industry and integrity, coupled with his executive ability and iron determination, won him success in his undertakings, died at Cory Hill hospital, Boston, Nov. 6, 1908, aged seventy-five years. He was a descendant of Samuel Packard, the first of the name in America, who with his wife and child came from Windham, near Hingham, England, in the ship “Diligence,” of Ipswich, and settled first at Hingham, Mass., in 1638, thence removing to West Bridgewater, where he became one of the early settlers, and where he was a tavern-keeper

Ancestry of Elmer C. Packard of Brockton Massachusetts

For nearly two hundred and seventy-five years the Packard family has been one prominent and influential in New England, and it has become a most numerous family, too, many of whose members both at home and abroad have given a good account of themselves. Samuel Packard, the immigrant ancestor of this family, became one of …

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