Topic: Will

Will Of Lionell Chute

The will of Lionell Chute of Ipswich, dated 4: 7 mo: 1644, was proved in court at Ipswich 7: 9 mo: 1645. The original instrument has not been found, and the following copy is from the record in Ipswich deeds, book i, leaf 15. The fourth day of the eleventh month Anno Dm 1644 I Lionell Chute of the Towne of Ipfwch in New England Schoolmafter doe make & ordayne this my laft will & Teftament (revoking all form wills by me made.) Item I give vntd Rofe my wife for terme of her naturall life, all this my dwelling

Will of Richard Woodman

The nuncupative will of Richard Woodman of Lynn was sworn to in Salem quarterly court 30: 10: 1647. The following is a copy of the original on file in the office of the clerk of courts at Salem, volume I, leaf 89. The will of Richard Woodman of the Towne of Lynn defeced [deceased] as foloweth [follows] Being fpoken [spoken] to by Nicholas (Potter) to make his will Paid that he would make his will and being asked by John Gillow too whome [whom] he would giue [give] his goods faid [said] that he would giue [give] fower [four] pounds

Will of John Lowell

The following is a copy of the will of John Lowell of Newbury transcribed from the ancient copy on file in the probate office in Boston. It was proved 27: 8: 1647. The Laft [last] will & Teftament [Testament] of John Lowle Late of Newberry deceafed [deceased] made this nine & twentieth of the fowrth [forth] mounth 1647. That I John Lowle of Newberry beeing in Pfect [perfect] vnderstanding [understanding] knowing my ffrailty [frailty] doe [do] declare this to bee [be] my last will & Tefament [testament]; ftedfaftly [faithfully] beleiveing that when I goe [go] hence I shall reft [rest]

Will Of Robert Hunter

The will of Robert Hunter, dated 5: 6mo: 1647, was proved in the Ipswich court 28: 7: 1647. The following copy is taken from the record contained in the Ipswich Deeds, volume 1, leaf 25, the original being missing. This 5th of the 6th month 1647. I Robert Hunter weak of body but of pfect memory prayfed be god doe make & ordayne this to be my laft will & Teftament. firft all my debts being paid I leave my howfe & lott to my wife Mary Hunter for Terme of her life. Item all my goods within the howfe

Will Of Richard Bartlett

The nuncupative will of Richard Bartlett, sr., of Newbury, was proved in the Ipswich court 28: 7: 1647. The following is a copy of the same as recorded in the Ipswich Deeds, volume I, leaf 25. The testimony of William Titcombe & Anthony Somersby concerning the last will & testament of Richard Bartlett fen of Newbury deceased the 20th of May 1647. About a month before he deceased we being with him & two of his sonnes being prfent he being very ill & had been weak all the spring finding in himself that he was not like to continue

Genealogy of John Peter Stoneburner

John Peter Stoneburner, fifth child of Johann Peter and Susanna Stoneburner, was born in Virginia before his parents moved to Morgan Co., Ohio. It was probably in Ohio that he married Catherine sometime around 1810. On the 12th of October 1879-john Stoneburner wrote his will. It read: “In the name of the Benevolent Father of all, I, John Stoneburner of the State of Ohio and of the County of Morgan, do make and publish this my Last will and testament Item 1st–I wish my Beloved Wife to remain on the Farm and in the House where we now reside and

Genealogy of Samuel Austin

Samuel, only surviving son of Henry and Elizabeth Lyles Austin, continued living in Calvert County, Maryland. By 1730, Samuel was married to Elizabeth Marshall, daughter of Thomas and Margaret Marshall. They had eleven surviving children when Samuel’s will was written in 1763. Some of their children moved to Virginia, specifically Albemarle County. Samuel Austin’s will of 1763 read: “In the name of God amen. I Samuel Austin of Calvert County in the province of Maryland, planter being in good health of body and of sound anal perfect mind and memory, I do make and ordain this my last will and

Genealogy of Henry Austin

Austin as a surname is a variation of Augustine or Augustus. The Austin line enters the Spracklin line with the marriage of George E. Spracklin to Grace Belle Austin on 29 March 1903. There have been several Austin coats of arms granted as early as 1660 but many of the lines have died out. This particular Austin line came early to Calvert Co., Maryland. They were planters, that is, owners of plantations and more than likely raised tobacco on the land there. To help them with their plantations, they owned slaves as evidenced by wills. And it is quite possible,

Walter Woodworth

Walter Woodworth came from Kent Co., England, to Scituate, Mass., 1635. Was assigned the third lot on Kent St., which runs along the ocean front, at the corner of Meeting House Lane, and there he built a house. In that year he owned other land, a tract on the First Herring Brook not far below Stockbridge Mill, where afterwards stood the residence of the poet Samuel Woodworth, and another tract on Walnut Tree Hill, just west of the present Greenbush or South Scituate R. R. Station, which was in early times called Walter Woodworth’s Hill, and in 1666 he became

Mark Haskell Fourth Generation

MARK4 (Mark,3 Marks2 Mark1), baptized March 16, 1729; d. Aug. 29, 1811; lived at the ferry. He first learned the earthern-ware business at Danvers ; but through dislike of his occupation he removed back to Marblehead, and assumed that of a shoreman. Aug. 29, 17555, he sold to Susannah, widow of Mark Haskell, his father, a house and land, bounded S. W. on the street by the new meeting-house (now Unitarian), 28 feet S. on Strikers land, E. 011 Batchelder’s land, Mark to a stake &c., leaving 22 feet on land of said 13 inches from the south corner of