Scarborough

Southern kith and kin; a record of my children’s ancestors

v. 1. The Locketts; v. 2. Davis family and their connections; v. 3. Major James Scarborough : his ancestors and descendants; v. 4. Family potpourri. Surnames: Aldredge, Bryans, Bullock, Clark, Davis, Eason, Gardners, Grigg, Hanson, Hill, Jones, Lockett, Osborne, Russell, Scarborough, Sims, Smith, Stovall, Stringer, Sumners, Tatom, and Tharpe.

Biography of George Scarborough

Born in Brooklyn, Conn., July 28th, 1806. His parents were Samuel and Molly Cleaveland Scarborough. worthy representatives of respected ancestors. For twentythree years George Scarborough lived the farmer’s life, early entering on its arduous labors and working from April to December fifteen hours a day. His educational privileges were such as four winter months each …

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Biography of Noah Scarborough

The name Scarborough is an old and honorable one. Family records show that several brothers came to this country during the Revolutionary War and settled here. The Scarborough coat of arms shows that this family descended from the nobility of Great Britain. Noah Scarborough emigrated from South Carolina to Houston County, Georgia, later moving to …

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A Genealogy of the Lake Family

A genealogy of the Lake family of Great Egg Harbour in Old Gloucester County in New Jersey : descended from John Lade of Gravesend, Long Island; with notes on the Gravesend and Staten Island branches of the family. This volume of nearly 400 pages includes a coat-of-arms in colors, two charts, and nearly fifty full page illustrations – portraits, old homes, samplers, etc. The coat-of-arms shown in the frontspiece is an unusually good example of the heraldic art!

1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

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