Surname: Robertson

Fort Dummer

Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.

Biography of John Evans Robertson

John Evans Robertson, a wellknown ice dealer of Concord, was born May 9, 1843, in Warner, N.H., son of Harrison D. and Sarah C. (Evans) Robertson, both of Warner. The families of both parents were old residents of Merrimack County, New Hampshire. The maternal ancestors originally came from Newburyport, Mass., where Grandfather Benjamin Evans officiated as Sheriff, being also a prominent business man. John E. Robertson attended the public schools of Warner, and subsequently fitted for college in the academy at Henniker, N.H. However, after leaving school at the age of eighteen, he did not go to college. In 1864

Biographical Sketch of Judge A. E. Robertson

(See Ghigau, Foreman, Riley and Conrad).—Arthur Evans son of Evans Price and Sarah Ellen (Spears) Robertson was born at Hulbert, Cherokee Nation, Tuesday, September 18, 1888. He was educated in the Cherokee National Schools, Henry Kendall College of Muskogee, graduating from the preparatory department; St. Charles Military College, St. Charles, Missouri; University of Tulsa, from which he graduated; University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma and University of Paris, Paris, France. He served in the A. E. F. in France with the 143rd Infantry, 36th Division. His Cherokee name is Wah-la-seee and he belongs to the Bird Clan. He is a member

Montgomery Co., Ky

MONTGOMERY CO. (Gladys Robertson) In this community most of the slaves were kept on farms and each family was given a well constructed log house. They were fed by provisions given them by their white masters and they were plentiful. They were clothed by their masters. These clothes were made by the colored women under the direction and supervision of their mistress, the white woman cut the clothes for both men and women, and the colored women did the sewing of the garments. The men did the manual labor on the farm and the women the domestic. Each white woman

Slave Narrative of Jim Allen

Interviewer: Mrs. Ed Joiner Person Interviewed: Jim Allen Location: West Point, Mississippi Age: 87 Jim Allen, West Point, age 87, lives in a shack furnished by the city. With him lives his second wife, a much older woman. Both he and his wife have a reputation for being “queer” and do not welcome outside visitors. However, he readily gave an interview and seemed most willing to relate the story of his life. “Yas, ma’m, I ‘members lots about slav’ry time, ’cause I was old ‘nough. “I was born in Russell County, Alabamy, an’ can tell you ’bout my own mammy

Slave Narrative of Jane Wilson

Interviewer: G. Leland Summer Person Interviewed: Jane Wilson Date of Interview: June 9, 1937 Location: Newberry, South Carolina Age: 77 “I am daughter of Billy Robertson and Louisa Robertson; was born about 77 years ago in Newberry, on Marse Job Johnstone’s place. My father lived with Judge Job Johnstone as his extra man or servant. He lived in the house with him, slept in his room and waited on him when he became old; and, too, was the driver of his carriage. He drove him to other courthouses to hold court. After the war, my father was janitor at Newberry

Slave Narrative of Alexander Robertson

Interviewer: W. W. Dixon Person Interviewed: Alexander Robertson Location: White Oak, South Carolina Age: 84 Ex-Slave 84 Years Old Alexander Robertson lives as a member of the household of his son, Charley, on the General Bratton plantation, four miles southeast of White Oak, S.C. It is a box-like house, chimney in the center, four rooms, a porch in front and morning glory vines, in bloom at this season, climbing around the sides and supports. Does Alexander sit here in the autumn sunshine and while the hours away? Nay, in fact he is still one of the active, working members of

Slave Narrative of Harriett Robinson

Person Interviewed: Harriet Robinson Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Bastrop, Texas Date of Birth: September 1, 1842 Age: 95 I was born close to Webbers Falls, in the Canadian District of the Cherokee Nation, in the same year that my pappy was blowed up and killed in the big boat accident that killed my old Master. I never did see my daddy excepting when I was a baby and I only know what my mammy told me about him. He come from across the water when he was a little boy, and was grown when old Master Joseph

Slave Narrative of Betty Robertson

Person Interviewed: Betty Robertson Location: Fort Gibson, Oklahoma Age: 93 I was born close to Webbers Falls, in the Canadian District of the Cherokee Nation, in the same year that my pappy was blowed up and killed in the big boat accident that killed my old Master. I never did see my daddy excepting when I was a baby and I only know what my mammy told me about him. He come from across the water when he was a little boy, and was grown when old Master Joseph Vann bought him, so he never did learn to talk much

Slave Narrative of Isabell Henderson

Interviewer: Mrs. Edith S. Hibbs Person Interviewed: Isabell Henderson Location: 1121 Rankin St., Wilmington, North Carolina Age: 83-84 Story Of Isabell Henderson, Negro I’ll be 84 years old come August 9. My gran’-daughter can tell you what year it was I was born I don’ ‘member but we has it down in the Bible. I lived near the “Clock Church” (Jewish Synagogue)[8], 4th and Market. We had a big place there. My gran’mother did the cookin’. My mother did the sewin’. I was jus five years old when the men went away. I guess to the war, I don’ know.