Surname: McKinney

Surrender of Santa Anna

Governor Houston at His Trading Post on the Verdigris

In February, 1828, the vanguard of Creek immigrants arrived at the Creek Agency on the Verdigris, in charge of Colonel Brearley, and they and the following members of the McIntosh party were located on a section of land that the Government promised in the treaty of 1826 to purchase for them. By the treaty of May 6, 1828, the Government assigned the Cherokee a great tract of land, to which they at once began to remove from their homes in Arkansas. The movement had been under way for some months when there appeared among the Indians the remarkable figure of Samuel Houston. The biographers of Houston have told the world next to nothing of his sojourn of three or four years in the Indian country, an interesting period when he was changing the entire course of his life and preparing for the part he was to play in the drama of Texas.

Early Life in Colorado

Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

Choctaw Law Forbidding White-Indian Marriage

Of the Choctaws regulating the marriage of white men to the Choctaw women: Whereas, the Choctaw Nation is being filled up with white persons of worthless characters by so-called marriages to the great injury of the Choctaw people. Section 1st. Be it enacted by the General Council of the Choctaw Nation assembled: That the peace and prosperity of the Choctaw people require that any white man or citizen of the United States, or of any foreign government, desiring to marry a Choctaw woman, citizen of the Choctaw Nation, shall be and is hereby required to obtain a license for the

Biography of Robert H. McKinney

ROBERT H. McKINNEY was born November 26, 1845, in Todd County, Ky. His parents are William W. and Rebecca (Griffin) McKinney, natives of Kentucky. The parents of William W. were John and Naomi (Ridgedill) McKinney, natives of South Carolina. John died in 1834, aged sixty-five. His wife died in 1824, aged about 50 years. Of their eleven children, Nancy Rector, of Texas, and William W. are all who survive. The latter is one of the respected, good farmers of the county, owning at present writing 300 acres of land. His first marriage, to Rebecca Griffin, August 25, 1840, resulted in

Biography of George B. McKinney

George B. McKinney is the vice president of the investment securities firm operating under the name of b’. J. Matre & Company in St. Louis. Before establishing his present business he had gained an enviable record as a salesman who was relied upon from year to year by a large clientele of bond purchasers who found him thoroughly posted and reliable in every way. Before coming to St. Louis he was employed on Wall street in New York city and had become thoroughly familiar with the methods and opportunities of the financial world. He is an eastern man by birth,

Biography of Benjamin F. McKinney

BENJAMIN F. McKINNEY. The incidents in the early life of the original of this notice were not materially different from those of other boys living on farms. He was taught to work, to make himself useful around the pioneer homestead, and, in common with other boys, to attend the winter schools at intervals, and to assist in improving the farm during the summer. His birth occurred in Smith County, Tennessee, in 1838. He was the eldest of six children born to R. S. and Ann S. (Roe) McKinney. The other children were named as follows: William died in infancy; Jordon

Biography of George F. McKinney

GEORGE F. MCKINNEY. No State in the Union gives greater encourage-ment to a man who desires to devote himself to agriculture than does Arkansas. Its resources are almost inexhaustible, and its climate is adapted to the culti-vation of varied crops. Among the prominent and enterprising farmers of Boone County is George F. McKinney, who owes his nativity to Franklin County, this State, his birth having occurred on the 28th of January, 1843. His parents were John A. and Lucetta (Fleeman) McKinney, the former of whom was born in Alabama in 1800, a son of George McKinney, who was one of

Biographical Sketch of John McKinney

John McKinney, of Staunton, Virginia, served in the American army during the latter part of the revolution, and had his thigh broken by a musket ball, which lamed him for life. He settled at Lexington, Kentucky, where he taught school, and was elected Sheriff of the County. He married a Mexican woman, by whom he raised a large family. In 1805 he came to Missouri on a trading and prospecting tour, and in 1809 he moved his family here. When the Indian war began, he took his family back to Kentucky, to get them out of danger. His son Alexander

Biographical Sketch of Capt. David McKinney

Capt. David McKinney, farmer; P. O. Arcola; the subject of this sketch was born in Butler Co., Ohio, March 22, 1837. He married Miss Catharine Rork Jan. 25, 1866; she was born same place; they have six children, viz., Ida May, Oron W., Charles N., Jessie, Otto and Ruey he lived in Ohio until he was 21, when he came to Illinois and settled in Coles, now Douglas Co., near Arcola; in December, 1861, he enlisted in the 54th I. V. I., he being Orderly of Co. I, and after seven months’ service he was made Second Lieutenant, and after