Hunt

Hunt Family of Boreatton

A101 THOMAS HUNT, of Gouldstone, Cheswardine, Salop: m. Elizabeth, dau. of Humphrey Gouldstone. A102 RICHARD, of Shrewsbury, alderman and bailiff, 1613, 1616, 1622, 1631: m. Oct. 10. 1598, Elinor Cooke. A103 THOMAS, of Betton Strange, Salop; high sheriff, 1656; Member of Parliament, 1657. A104 ROLAND, of Boreatton, Salop; high sheriff, 1652; baptized May 28,1629. A105 …

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Chandler Family of Boston and East Bridgewater MA

This Boston – East Bridgewater Chandler family, the head of which was the late Hon. Peleg Whitman Chandler, long one of the leading counselors of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and one of a family of lawyers, comes of a Massachusetts-Maine branch of the ancient Duxbury family whose progenitor was Edmund Chandler. The branch just alluded to for several generations at New Gloucester and Bangor, Maine, and at Boston in this Commonwealth, has been one of liberal education, college-bred men, men who have adorned the legal profession, and it has allied itself through generations with a number of the ancient and first families of the Old Colony. There follows in chronological order from Edmund Chandler, the first American ancestor of this branch of American Chandlers, and in detail the family history and genealogy.

Biographical Sketch of William Henry Hunt

Hunt, William Henry; Iife insurance; born, Warren, O., Jan. 28, 1868; son of William B. and Rabecca Myers Hunt; public school education; married, Akron, O., Oct. 15, 1912, Mary: Fairchild Sanford; chairman committee on Municipal Art and Architecture, Chamber of Commerce; member Wholesale Merchants’ and Manufacturers Board; for a number of years vice pres. of …

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Richard Dexter Genealogy, 1642-1904

Being a history of the descendants of Richard Dexter of Malden, Massachusetts, from the notes of John Haven Dexter and original researches. Richard Dexter, who was admitted an inhabitant of Boston (New England), Feb. 28, 1642, came from within ten miles of the town of Slane, Co. Meath, Ireland, and belonged to a branch of that family of Dexter who were descendants of Richard de Excester, the Lord Justice of Ireland. He, with his wife Bridget, and three or more children, fled to England from the great Irish Massacre of the Protestants which commenced Oct. 27, 1641. When Richard Dexter and family left England and by what vessel, we are unable to state, but he could not have remained there long, as we know he was living at Boston prior to Feb. 28, 1642.

Slave Narrative of Nan Stewart

Interviewer: Sarah Probst Person Interviewed: Nan Stewart Location: Ohio Place of Birth: Charleston, West Virginia Date of Birth: February 1850 Age: 87 Sarah Probst, Reporter Audrey Meighen, Author-Editor Jun 9, 1937 Folklore Meigs County, District Three [HW: Middeport] “I’se bawned Charl’stun, West Virginia in February 1850.” “My mammy’s name? Hur name wuz Kath’run Paine an’ …

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Hunt Officers in the Continental Army

HUNT, ABRAHAM (Mass.): Adjutant of Gerrish’s Massachusetts Regiment, May to December, 1775; 2nd Lieutenant and Adjutant 25th Continental Infantry, 1st January to 31st December, 1776; Captain 1st Massachusetts, 1st January, 1777; resigned 31st August, 1780. HUNT, DAVID (N. Y.) : Private 2nd New York, 5th May 1778, to 17th February 1779; Regimental Quartermaster 5th New …

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Descendants of William Brett of Bridgewater, MA

Ellis Brett, president of the Plymouth County Trust Company, of Brockton, and one of that city’s honored and respected citizens, is a worthy representative of historic New England ancestry, the Brett family having resided in this community since the first settlement of the mother town of Bridgewater, from which the town of North Bridgewater (now Brockton) was set off. Mr. Brett was born in the latter town Oct. 23, 1840, only son of Ephraim and Ruth (Copeland) Brett. The early history of the Brett family in America begins with William Brett, who came to Duxbury, Mass., in 1645, from Kent, England, and later became one of the fifty-four original proprietors and first settlers of the town of ancient Bridgewater, settling in the West parish of the town. He was an elder in the church, and often when the Rev. James Keith, the first ordained pastor of the church there, was ill, Mr. Brett preached to the people. He was a leading man in both church and town affairs, and was deputy to the General Court from the date of the in-corporation of ancient Bridgewater in 1656 to 1661. That he was well educated and intelligent is manifest from a letter to Governor Winslow, still extant, and he was much esteemed by his brethren and often employed in their secular affairs. He died Dec. 17, 1681, aged sixty-three years

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