Surname: Hunt

Genealogical record of Thomas Wait and his descendants

Genealogical Record of Thomas Wait and his descendants

Genealogical Record of Thomas Wait and his descendants looks at the genealogy of Thomas Wait (1601-1677) who was from Wethersfield Parish, Essex, England. On his arrival in America, landing in Rhode Island, he applied for a lot on which to build,and was granted it on 7/1/1639. On 3/l6/l641 he became a Freeman in Newport R. I. He died in Portsmouth R. I., before April 1677 intestate. This Thomas Wait was a cousin to the Richard Waite of Watertown Mass., who was a large land owner. This unpublished manuscript provides the descendants of this family.

Old Families of Southeastern Massachusetts

Beal Genealogy of Abington Massachusetts

The Beal family of Abington, the head of which was the late George A. Beal, Esq., who for years was one of the leading men of the town, prominent in business and public affairs and useful and substantial in citizenship, is one of long and honorable standing in this section of the Commonwealth and is a branch of the earlier Weymouth family, where early appeared the immigrant settler. By the marriage of the late Mr. Beal into the Reed family, his posterity is doubly descended from the Puritan stock of the early Colonial period of Massachusetts. There follows in chronological order from the immigrant settler, John Beal, the genealogy of the particular Abington family of Beals alluded to.

Horace A. Lawton

Lawton Genealogy of New Bedford Massachusetts

The branch of the Lawton family so long resident in New Bedford, and in each generation active in public affairs, but recently represented by the late Charles H. and Horace A. Lawton, well known druggists, the former long prominent in the government of the town and an important factor in the financial and commercial life, is descended from George Lawton, a brother of Thomas and possibly of John also, all of Newport as early as 1638 or 1639. George and Thomas were among the twenty-eight signers of the Compact, April 30, 1639, for the formation of a “civil body politicke.” George Lawton was made a freeman in 1655; member of the Court of Trials, 1648; deputy, 1665-72-75-76-79-80; assistant, 1680-81-82-83-84-85-86-89-90. He and five other assistants, with the deputy governor, wrote a letter to their Majesties, William and Mary, congratulating them on their accession to the Crown, and informing them that since the deposition of Governor Andros the former government under the charter had been resumed. He seems to have been prominent in all the Colonial affairs of his time. He died Oct. 5, 1693, and was buried in his orchard at Portsmouth. He married Elizabeth Hazard, daughter of Thomas and Martha Hazard.

Old Families of Southeastern Massachusetts

Ancestry of Nathaniel Reynolds Packard, 2d of Brockton Massachusetts

Nathaniel Reynolds Packard, 2d, who belonged to the older school of shoe manufacturers in Brockton, and whose industry and integrity, coupled with his executive ability and iron determination, won him success in his undertakings, died at Cory Hill hospital, Boston, Nov. 6, 1908, aged seventy-five years. He was a descendant of Samuel Packard, the first of the name in America, who with his wife and child came from Windham, near Hingham, England, in the ship “Diligence,” of Ipswich, and settled first at Hingham, Mass., in 1638, thence removing to West Bridgewater, where he became one of the early settlers, and where he was a tavern-keeper

Elmer C. Packard

Ancestry of Elmer C. Packard of Brockton Massachusetts

For nearly two hundred and seventy-five years the Packard family has been one prominent and influential in New England, and it has become a most numerous family, too, many of whose members both at home and abroad have given a good account of themselves. Samuel Packard, the immigrant ancestor of this family, became one of the early settlers of the ancient town of Bridgewater, and all of the name who have gone from the Bridgewaters were probably descendants of his; in fact, nearly all of the name in this country can be traced to that place. The genealogical records following

Weymouth ways and Weymouth people

Weymouth ways and Weymouth people

Edward Hunt’s “Weymouth ways and Weymouth people: Reminiscences” takes the reader back in Weymouth Massachusetts past to the 1830s through the 1880s as he provides glimpses into the people of the community. These reminiscences were mostly printed in the Weymouth Gazette and provide a fair example of early New England village life as it occurred in the mid 1800s. Of specific interest to the genealogist will be the Hunt material scattered throughout, but most specifically 286-295, and of course, those lucky enough to have had somebody “remembered” by Edward.

Ancestor Register of Esther Steelman Adams

A Genealogy of the Lake Family

A genealogy of the Lake family of Great Egg Harbour in Old Gloucester County in New Jersey : descended from John Lade of Gravesend, Long Island; with notes on the Gravesend and Staten Island branches of the family. This volume of nearly 400 pages includes a coat-of-arms in colors, two charts, and nearly fifty full page illustrations – portraits, old homes, samplers, etc. The coat-of-arms shown in the frontspiece is an unusually good example of the heraldic art!

Genealogy of the Goff Family of Attleboro, Mass.

MAJ. WILLIAM HUNT GOFF, one of Attleboro’s well known citizens and leading public men, is a native of the Old Bay State, born in the town of Rehoboth, April 10, 1845. He is a descendant of one of the oldest families of Rehoboth, where the Goffs have figured more or less prominently, as well as in the nearby towns in Rhode Island, since about 1720, the date of which there is record of the families of Richard and Samuel Goff. From these two men have sprung a number whose names have been written high on the roll of fame in