Surname: Hodge

Some descendants of Thomas Rowley of Windsor Connecticut

Some Descendants of Thomas Rowley of Windsor, Connecticut

Title: Some descendants of Thomas Rowley of Windsor, Connecticut, with lineage of families allied by marriage Author: Mildred Gertrude Rowley Crankshaw Publication date: 1961-1965 Publisher: Digitizing sponsor: Internet Archive Contributor: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center Repository Internet Archive Read Book Download PDF Some descendants of Thomas Rowley of Windsor. Thomas Rowley. Thomas Rowley (Rowell) a cordwainer, was in Windsor Connecticut as early as 1662, and Simsbury Connecticut by 1670. He died 1 May, 1705/8, estate inventory dated 1 May 1708. Married at Windsor, 5 May, 1669 by Rev. Wolcott, Mary Denslow, daughter of Henry, Windsor, born 10 Aug. 1651,

Descendants of Richard Kimball of Ipswich MA

KIMBALL. Richard Kimball, of the parish of Rattlesden, County of Suffolk, England, with his family, came to New England in the ship “Elizabeth” in 1634, arriving at Boston, and thence went to Watertown, Mass. He soon became a prominent and active man in the new settlement, was proclaimed a freeman in 1635, and was proprietor in 1636-37. Soon thereafter he removed to Ipswich, where he passed the remainder of his life. His services as a wheelwright were very much appreciated. Mr. Kimball married Ursula, daughter of Henry Scott, of Rattlesden, and (second) Oct. 25, 1661, Mrs. Margaret Dow, of Hampton,

1860 Free Inhabitants Creek Nation Page 1

1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

An Artists rendition of James Smith

Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

Biography of Miss Mary Hodge

Miss Mary Sue Hodge, daughter of Duke Hullum and Eliza Crawford Hodge, was born in Gordon County, Georgia, December 27, 1845. Her grandfather, James Hodge, was a Methodist minister at Oxford, Georgia, for many years. Her grandfather, John A. Crawford, was a Baptist minister of Cassville, Georgia, then the county seat of Bartow County. He served this church for twenty-five years and, gave the land on which Cherokee Baptist College for Boys was built, and was a trustee of that college. Her father died while yet a young man, leaving nine children whom her mother reared and educated during the

Hodge, William – Obituary

Enterprise, Wallowa County, Oregon William Henry Hodge, 87, died Saturday, Dec. 25, 1993, at Elzora Manor Care Center in Milton-Freewater. Funeral services will be held Thursday, Dec. 30, 10:30 a.m. at Munselle-Rhodes Funeral Home in Milton-Freewater. Internment will be in the Enterprise Cemetery, Thursday, Dec. 30 at 2:30 p.m. Mr. Hodge was born Aug. 11, 1906, in Enterprise, the son of Steve and Barbara (Hammock) Hodge. He attended school in Joseph. He worked as a logger/tree faller, a sheepherder and on cattle and grain farms. On June 30, 1929, he married Nellie Cooper. They lived in Enterprise until 1939 when

Hodge, Barbara R. – Obituary

Enterprise, Wallowa County, Oregon Barbara R. Hodge Dies In Enterprise Mrs. Barbara Rachel Hodge, 86, who had been in failing health for several years, died Tuesday, June 3 at her home in Enterprise. Funeral services were today at 2 p.m. at the Enterprise Nazarene church with the Bollman funeral home in charge. The Rev. Don C. McBride officiated and burial was in the Enterprise cemetery. Mrs. Hodge was born in Laurel County, Ky., October 6, 1871, daughter of Rev. Newton E. and Maryann Hammack. She had been a resident of Wallowa County since 1902. She was a member of the

Earl O. Hodge

Seaman, 1st Class, U. S. N.; from the County of Wake, N.C.; the son of J. W. and Margaret Hodge. Entered the service at Raleigh, N.C., June 9, 1918. Sent to Norfolk, Va. Transferred to U. S. S. “Powhatan,” a transport ship and then to receiving ship at Hampton Roads, Va. Made 10 trips across on transport duty. Mustered out of the service at Hampton Roads, Va., Sept. 10, 1919.

Biographical Sketch of Levi Hodge

Levi Hodge, a native of Warwick, Mass., came to Stowe and located where his son, Russell C., now resides, and where he died in 1862, aged about seventy-five years. Russell C. is superintendent of the town poor farm, which is owned in union by the towns of Stowe, Morristown, and Johnson.