Ward

History of the township and village of Mazomanie, Wisconsin

The manuscript, History of the township and village of Mazomanie [Wisconsin] penned by William Kittle and published in 1900 collected information from a wide variety of sources, both documents, and living interviews. This book provides a general history of the township, and then presents a series of brief biographical sketches on the early settlers of Mazomanie. The links below will take you to the start of each historical section as detailed in the contents for the book, and then the specific pages of the book where each biographical sketch is contained. There is no index for the book, nor is there a list of biographical sketches contained within. We have taken the liberty of creating a biographical index for it.

J. W. Ward

1st Class Machinist, Aviation (Naval). Born in Pasquotank County; the son of Johnathan and Mrs. Sarah Ward. Husband of Emma Ward. Entered service Sept. 13, 1917, at Elizabeth City, N.C. Sent to Hampton Roads, Va., from there to Camp Greene, N.C., Sept. 10, 1918. Promoted to rank of 1st Class Machinist August, 1918. In charge …

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History of Adair County Iowa and its People – vol 2

Back in 1915, Lucian Moody Kilburn, was engaged to write a history of Adair County Iowa by the Pioneer Publishing Company of Chicago Illinois, he then being at that time a resident of the county for 50 years. The manuscript was divided into two volumes. This volume, numbered 2, provides biographical sketches of 348 leading men and women of the County of Adair including many of its founding families. You can read or download the free eBook from this website.

Indian Hostilities in California and New Mexico – Indian Wars

In New Mexico, which became a part of the United States territory at the same time as California, the Indians are numerous and far more formidable than those farther west. The Apache Indians and Navajo Indians are the most powerful tribes west of the Mississippi. Being strong, active, and skillful, war is their delight, and they were the terror of the New Mexicans before the territory was occupied by the United States troops. The Pueblo Indians are among the best and most peaceable citizens of New Mexico. They, early after the Spanish conquest, embraced the forms of religion and the manners and customs of their then more civilized masters. The Pimos and Maricopos are peaceable tribes who cultivate the ground and endeavor to become good citizens. They are much exposed to the irresistible attacks of the Apache Indians and Navajo Indians, and, very often, the fruits of their honest toil become the plunder of those fierce wanderers.

Slave Narrative of Florida Clayton

Interviewer: Rachel A. Austin Person Interviewed: Florida Clayton Location: Jacksonville, Florida Age: 82 The life of Florida Clayton is interesting in that it illustrates the miscegenation prevalent during the days of slavery. Interesting also is the fact that Florida was not a slave even though she was a product of those turbulent days. Many years …

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Bolton Massachusetts Warnings 1737-1788

In the following information all the names, dates and other essential particulars which appear in the returns to the Court in the County of Worcester during the entire period – a full half-century, from 1737 to 1788 – in which these entries were made, are given. The returns from each place have been brought together and arranged under the name of the town or district, in this case Bolton Massachusetts.

Expeditions of Fowler and James to Santa Fe, 1821

When Pike returned from his western expedition and related his experiences in Santa Fe and other places among the Spaniards, his accounts excited great interest in the east, which resulted in further exploits. In 1812, an expedition was undertaken by Robert McKnight, James Baird, Samuel Chambers, Peter Baum, Benjamin Shrive, Alfred Allen, Michael McDonald, William Mines, and Thomas Cook, all citizens of Missouri Territory; they were arrested by the Spaniards, charged with being in Spanish territory without a passport, and thrown into the calabazos of Chihuahua, where they were kept for nine years. In 1821, two of them escaped, and coming down Canadian and Arkansas rivers met Hugh Glenn, owner of a trading house at the mouth of the Verdigris, and told him of the wonders of Santa Fe. Inspired by the accounts of these travelers, Glenn engaged in an enterprise with Major Jacob Fowler and Captain Pryor for an expedition from the Verdigris to Santa Fe.

Biography of Samuel Ward

Samuel Ward. One of the worthy, industrious and progressive agriculturists of Republic County, Kansas, is Samuel Ward, who is engaged in operating a finely-cultivated farm in Belleville Township. He had been a resident of Kansas since 1883, and in addition to being a skilled farmer, had at various times held positions of trust in the …

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The Cherokee Revolt – Indian Wars

From the removal of the Cherokee Indians from Georgia and Tennessee to Arkansas and their establishment upon the reservation allotted to them by treaty with the Government in Arkansas, they have, until the period of this outbreak to the narrative of which this chapter is devoted, been considered as among the least dangerous and most …

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Genealogy of John Howe of Sudbury and Marlborough, Massachusetts

The compilation of this Howe Family Genealogy is due to the researches of Judge Daniel Wait Howe of Indianapolis, Indiana. Begun many years ago, the greater part of the work was done by him and under his supervision. It proved to be a stupendous task and involved much labor and expense. Originating in a desire to make a short record for his children, the work gradually expanded, taking in all known descendants of John How of Sudbury and Marlborough and later welcoming with equal care and research the other lines; and, in fact, all material relating to the name of Howe.

Ward, Nellie Maud

Nellie Maud (Fisher) Ward Nell Fisher Ward, a lifetime resident of Wallowa CO., died April 26, 1981, at Wallowa Memorial hospital. She was 80 years old. The daughter of Hiram and Emma Rundall Fisher, she was born Sept. 18, 1902 in Lostine. On March 14, 1923, she married Landy Orlando Ward in Enterprise. Graveside services …

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Genealogy of the Fox Family of Taunton, Massachusetts

The Connecticut-Massachusetts branch of the earlier family of this name of the old Bay State is one of long and honorable standing in New England, and as well of historic connection. The especial family here considered, and which for designation is styled the Taunton family, is that of pome of the descendants of Capt. Jabez Fox, of Berkley, Mass., one of whose sons was the late Henry Hodges Fox and the latter’s son the present Hon. William Henry Fox, lawyer and judge, who for forty and more years has been judge of the First District court of Bristol county and otherwise prominently identified with the public affairs of the city of Taunton.

1923 Historical and Pictorial Directory of Angola Indiana

Luedders’ historical and pictorial city directory of Angola, Indiana for the year 1923, containing an historical compilation of items of local interest, a complete canvass of names in the city, which includes every member of the family, college students, families on rural lines, directory of officers of county, city, lodges, churches, societies, a directory of streets, and a classified business directory.

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