Preston

Captivity and Escape of Mary Inglis (Ingles) – Indian Captivities

The captivity of Mary Draper Inglis (Ingles) is a third person account of her captivity and eventual escape. Mary was captured by Shawnee Indians along with her two sons, and sister-in-law from Draper’s Meadow in 1755. She eventually made her escape, along with another dutch woman, a few months later. This is her story.

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Families of Ancient New Haven

The Families of Ancient New Haven compilation includes the families of the ancient town of New Haven, covering the present towns of New Haven, East Haven, North Haven, Hamden, Bethany, Woodbridge and West Haven. These families are brought down to the heads of families in the First Census (1790), and include the generation born about 1790 to 1800. Descendants in the male line who removed from this region are also given, if obtainable, to about 1800, unless they have been adequately set forth in published genealogies.

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Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.

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Walter Merryman of Harpswell, Maine, and his descendants

Walter Merryman was kidnapped in an Irish port in 1700 and brought to Boston, Massachusetts, where he was indentured to a shipbuilder in Portland, Maine. He married Elizabeth Potter and settled in Harpswell, Maine. Descendants and relatives lived in Maine, New Hampshire, Connecticut, New York, Pennsylvania, Idaho and elsewhere. Includes Alexander, Curtiss, Hamilton, McManus, Stover, Webber and related families.

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Genealogy of John Howe of Sudbury and Marlborough, Massachusetts

The compilation of this Howe Family Genealogy is due to the researches of Judge Daniel Wait Howe of Indianapolis, Indiana. Begun many years ago, the greater part of the work was done by him and under his supervision. It proved to be a stupendous task and involved much labor and expense. Originating in a desire to make a short record for his children, the work gradually expanded, taking in all known descendants of John How of Sudbury and Marlborough and later welcoming with equal care and research the other lines; and, in fact, all material relating to the name of Howe.

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Genealogy of the Sharpless family

Five years after the great family bi-centennial reunion held on 25 August 1882 in Chester County, Pennsylvania, Gilbert Cope published his massive volume on the 200 years of Sharpless family ancestry in America, called “Genealogy of the Sharpless family : descended from John and Jane Sharples, settlers near Chester, Pennsylvania, 1682 : together with some account of the English ancestry of the family, including the results of researches by Henry Fishwick, F.H.S., and the late Joseph Lemuel Chester, LL.D. : and a full report of the bi-centennial reunion of 1882.”. This monumental, well-researched tome sought to answer the genealogical and historical questions and answers brought to light from that 1882 reunion. This book is free to search, read, and/or download.

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1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

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1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry

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Slave Narrative of Mrs. Preston

Interviewer: G. Monroe Person Interviewed: Mrs. Preston Location: Madison, Indiana Age: 83 Place of Residence: North Elm Street, Madison, Indiana G. Monroe Dist. 4 Jefferson County SLAVE STORY MRS. PRESTON’S STORY Mrs. Preston is an old lady, 83 years old, very charming and hospitable She lives on North Elm Street, Madison, Indiana. Her first recollections

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