Mosely

Narrative of the Captivity of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson – Indian Captivities

Mrs. Mary Rowlandson, Wife of the Rev. Joseph Rowlandson, Who Was Taken Prisoner when Lancaster was Destroyed, in the Year 1676; Written by Herself. On the 10th of February, 1676, came the Indians with great numbers  upon Lancaster: their first coming was about sun-rising. Hearing the noise of some guns, we looked out; several houses […]

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Contributions of the Old Residents’ Historical Association, Lowell MA

The Lowell Historical Society of Lowell Massachusetts published 6 volumes of “contributions” to the recording of the history of Lowell Massachusetts at the turn of the century. These contributions were continued by the contributions by the Lowell Historical Society. Volume I A Fragment, written in 1843, by Theodore Edson Boott, Kirk, by Theodore Edson Carpet-Weaving

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Dahlonega Georgia in 1848

Dahlonega, Georgia, April, 1848 The Cherokee word Dah-lon-e-ga signifies the place of yellow metal; and is now applied to a small hamlet at the foot of the Alleghany Mountains, in Lumpkin County, Georgia, which is reputed to be the wealthiest gold region in the United States. It is recorded of De Soto and his followers

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Migration of Families out of Norwich VT

At the first enumeration of the inhabitants of eastern Vermont, as made by the authority of New York in 1771, Norwich was found to be the most populous of all the towns of Windsor County, having forty families and 206 inhabitants. Windsor followed with 203, and Hartford was third with 190. The aggregate population of

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Herbert P. Mosely

Capt., Med. Corps, Co. 306, Engineers. Son of Wm. O. and Mrs. Fannie D. Mosely, of Lenoir County. Husband of Mrs. Eunice L. Andrews. Entered service Aug. 11, 1917, at Farmville, N.C. Sent to Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga. Transferred to Camp Jackson, to Camp Sevier and Camp Upton. Sailed for France July 31, 1918. Fought at

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Brown Genealogy

In 1895, Cyrus Henry Brown began collecting family records of the Brown family, initially with the intention of only going back to his great-grandfathers. As others became interested in the project, they decided to trace the family lineage back to Thomas Brown and his wife Mary Newhall, both born in the early 1600s in Lynn, Massachusetts. Thomas, John, and Eleazer, three of their sons, later moved to Stonington, Connecticut around 1688. When North Stonington was established in 1807, the three brothers were living in the southern part of the town. Wheeler’s “History of Stonington” contains 400 records of early descendants of the Brown family, taken from the town records of Stonington. However, many others remain unidentified, as they are not recorded in the Stonington town records. For around a century, the descendants of the three brothers lived in Stonington before eventually migrating to other towns in Connecticut and New York State, which was then mostly undeveloped. He would eventually write this second volume of his Brown Genealogy adding to and correcting the previous edition. This book is free to search, read, and/or download.

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Marriage records of Liberty County Georgia, 1785-1895

These marriage records were abstracted from unbound marriage bonds and licenses in the Liberty County Courthouse, Hinesville, Georgia. The names were copied as they were spelled on the bonds, often barely legible and often spelled differently on the same bond. Sometimes the marriages were performed before the licenses were issued. The first date given in the abstracts is the date of the license or bond; the second is the date of marriage. The following abbreviations are used in these abstracts with the meaning indicated:

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