Surname: Milam

Biographical Sketch of J. B. Milam

(See Oolootsa and Grant)—Elizabeth Peach McSpadden, born August 27, 1883 at Chelsea, Cherokee Nation, educated at Chelsea and the Female Seminary at Tahlequah, from which she graduated June 9, 1903. Married April 6, 1904 Jesse Bartley Milam, born March 10, 1884, graduated from the Metropolitan Business College, Dallas, Texas, May 24, 1902; President of the Bank of Chelsea, and was appointed as one of the three members of the Sta1e Banking Board in 1920. Mr. and Mrs. Milam are the parents of: Hindman Stuart, born April 16, 1907; Mildred Elizabeth, born May 10, 1910, and Mary Ellen, born May 16,

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. G. W. Milam

(See Grant).—Sarah Ellen Couch, born near Italy, Texas, October 17, 1863, educated in Texas and at the Female Seminary of the Cherokee Nation, married October 20, 1881, William Guinn Milam, born March 12, 1860 in Moulton, Lawrence county, Alabama. He is the son of J. B. and Sallie J. Milam. William Guinn and Sarah E. Milam are the parents of: Jesse Bartley, born March 10, 1884; Allie, born November 26, 1885; Noolie, born November 16, 1888; Viola, born February 17, 1891 Charles, born July 23, 1894, enlisted in the 90th Division Headquarters Signal Corpse, 358th. Infantry; was killed in action

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Walker Milam

(See Oolootsa, Cordery, Downing and Grant)—Maude Irene McSpadden, born April 5, 1896, educated at Chelsea, and A. & M. College at Stillwater, graduated from the Chelsea High School in 1916, married at Chelsea May 19, 1917 William Walker Milam, born July 26, 1896. educated at Chelsea, Kemper Military School, Boonville, Missouri and Oklahoma University. He served in the army during the World War; he is president of the Milam Oil Company, is a 32nd degree Mason and Shriner. Mr. and Mrs. Milam are the parents of: William Thomas, born June 19, 1918, and Walker Mortlock, born January 24, 1921. Robert

1830 Map of Cherokee Territory in Georgia

Biographies of the Cherokee Indians

Whatever may be their origins in antiquity, the Cherokees are generally thought to be a Southeastern tribe, with roots in Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee, among other states, though many Cherokees are identified today with Oklahoma, to which they had been forcibly removed by treaty in the 1830s, or with the lands of the Eastern Band of Cherokees in western North Carolina. The largest of the so-called Five Civilized Tribes, which also included Choctaws, Chickasaws, Creeks, and Seminoles, the Cherokees were the first tribe to have a written language, and by 1820 they had even adopted a form of government