Love

Asheville, North Carolina History

Copied from an article in the Asheville Daily Citizen of 1898, the same being excerpts from an article by Foster Sondley in the same issue, headed “Asheville’s Centenary” to which reference is hereby made-F.D. Love, ——–o———–o——— In speaking of the Court House, he says “On January 23rd, 1807 deeds were made to the Commissioners, Samuel

Asheville, North Carolina History Read More »

Indian Hostilities in California and New Mexico – Indian Wars

In New Mexico, which became a part of the United States territory at the same time as California, the Indians are numerous and far more formidable than those farther west. The Apache Indians and Navajo Indians are the most powerful tribes west of the Mississippi. Being strong, active, and skillful, war is their delight, and they were the terror of the New Mexicans before the territory was occupied by the United States troops. The Pueblo Indians are among the best and most peaceable citizens of New Mexico. They, early after the Spanish conquest, embraced the forms of religion and the manners and customs of their then more civilized masters. The Pimos and Maricopos are peaceable tribes who cultivate the ground and endeavor to become good citizens. They are much exposed to the irresistible attacks of the Apache Indians and Navajo Indians, and, very often, the fruits of their honest toil become the plunder of those fierce wanderers.

Indian Hostilities in California and New Mexico – Indian Wars Read More »

Letter from Thomas Love to his Nephew, James Robert Love

Letter from Thomas Love to his Nephew, James Robert Love, of Haywood County, North Carolina. Henry County, Paris, Tennessee. My Dear Nephew: 10 March 1843 I received your kind letter of the 23rd, Jan. 1843, which gave me much satisfaction to learn that my old and much beloved brother was still in the land of

Letter from Thomas Love to his Nephew, James Robert Love Read More »

Families of Ancient New Haven

The Families of Ancient New Haven compilation includes the families of the ancient town of New Haven, covering the present towns of New Haven, East Haven, North Haven, Hamden, Bethany, Woodbridge and West Haven. These families are brought down to the heads of families in the First Census (1790), and include the generation born about 1790 to 1800. Descendants in the male line who removed from this region are also given, if obtainable, to about 1800, unless they have been adequately set forth in published genealogies.

Families of Ancient New Haven Read More »

Address of Col. Allen T. Davidson at Lyceum Asheville, North Carolina

Extract from an Address delivered by Col. Allen T. Davidson, at Lyceum Asheville, N.C. Nov. 7th, 1890. “The most noted characters of the County who were in public life, were John Welch, General Thomas Love and Col Robert Love. These represented the County of Haywood for many years; preserved and maintained a high reputation until

Address of Col. Allen T. Davidson at Lyceum Asheville, North Carolina Read More »

Alfred Wilson Taylor and Elizabeth Duffied – Descendants

Alfred Wilson Taylor and Elizabeth Duffield Descendants. 1) William Carter Taylor, b. 12th December Friday Night 15 minutes past Nine o’clock, 1823; died Saturday December 2nd 1905 at 5:30 p.m.; never married, (and is still living on the old Taylor Homestead, Buffalo Creek, Carter County, Tennessee). 2) Nathaniel Macon Taylor, b. Friday morning 23rd day

Alfred Wilson Taylor and Elizabeth Duffied – Descendants Read More »

Robert Love – Letter About Pension Application

Copy of a letter received by Mrs. Margaret Hilliard from the Pension Department, Washington, D.C., and explains itself. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Pensions, Madam: Washington, D.C. Nov. 15, 1895 In response to your request for the military record of Robert Love, a soldier of the Revolutionary War, I have the honor to advise

Robert Love – Letter About Pension Application Read More »

The Osage Massacre

When the treaty council with the Osage at Fort Gibson broke up in disagreement on April 2, 1833, three hundred Osage warriors under the leadership of Clermont departed for the west to attack the Kiowa. It was Clermont’s boast that he never made war on the whites and never made peace with his Indian enemies. At the Salt Plains where the Indians obtained their salt, within what is now Woodward County, Oklahoma, they fell upon the trail of a large party of Kiowa warriors going northeast toward the Osage towns above Clermont’s. The Osage immediately adapted their course to that pursued by their enemies following it back to what they knew would be the defenseless village of women, children, and old men left behind by the warriors. The objects of their cruel vengeance were camped at the mouth of Rainy-Mountain Creek, a southern tributary of the Washita, within the present limits of the reservation at Fort Sill.

The Osage Massacre Read More »

Pin It on Pinterest

Scroll to Top