Surname: Chamberlin

Weymouth ways and Weymouth people

Weymouth ways and Weymouth people

Edward Hunt’s “Weymouth ways and Weymouth people: Reminiscences” takes the reader back in Weymouth Massachusetts past to the 1830s through the 1880s as he provides glimpses into the people of the community. These reminiscences were mostly printed in the Weymouth Gazette and provide a fair example of early New England village life as it occurred in the mid 1800s. Of specific interest to the genealogist will be the Hunt material scattered throughout, but most specifically 286-295, and of course, those lucky enough to have had somebody “remembered” by Edward.

Ancestor Register of Esther Steelman Adams

A Genealogy of the Lake Family

A genealogy of the Lake family of Great Egg Harbour in Old Gloucester County in New Jersey : descended from John Lade of Gravesend, Long Island; with notes on the Gravesend and Staten Island branches of the family. This volume of nearly 400 pages includes a coat-of-arms in colors, two charts, and nearly fifty full page illustrations – portraits, old homes, samplers, etc. The coat-of-arms shown in the frontspiece is an unusually good example of the heraldic art!

El Farol Masthead

Index to Articles found in the El Farol Newspaper 1905-1906

The Lincoln County New Mexico online archives contains pdf’s of all remaining copies of the El Farol Newspaper of Capitan NM, but doesn’t have an index to the newspaper. C. W. Barnum, an active member of AHGP, and state coordinator for the New Mexico AHGP recently invested his time and energy into providing an every person index to the various extant issues. He has shared this wonderful index with AccessGenealogy in hopes that it will reach a wider audience. Enjoy!

1918 Warren County Farmers’ Directory – C Surnames

Abbreviations Used in this Directory a–Acres; Ch — Children; O–Owner; T–Tenant or Renter; R –Rural Route; Sec-Section; Maiden name of wife follows directory name in parentheses (); figures at end of information–year became resident of county. Star (*) indicates children not at home. Name of farm follows names of children in quotations marks. In case of a tenant, the farm owner’s name follows the figures giving size of farm. Example: ABBEY, William L. (Lena Riggs) Martha and Cora Abbey, Mother and Sister; Kirkwood R1 Tompking Sec8-5 T80a H.M. Abbey Est. (1886) Tel. Farmers’ Line Kirkwood MEANS ABBEY, William L. –

Title Page for Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Story County, Iowa

Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Story County, Iowa

The full manuscript contains a condensed history of the state of Iowa, a number of biographies of distinguished citizens of the state of Iowa, a descriptive history of Story county and 229 selected biographical sketches of the citizens of Story County, Iowa.

Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont vol 1

Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

Norwich Vermont in the Civil War

During the four years of war for the suppression of the Rebellion, Norwich furnished 178 different men for the armies of the Union. There were seven re-enlistments, making the whole number of soldiers credited to the town 185. By the census of 1860, the number of inhabitants was 1759. It appears, therefore, that the town sent to the seat of war rather more than one in ten of its entire population, during the four years’ continuance of hostilities. About the same proportion holds good for the state at large, Vermont contributing, out of an aggregate population of 315,116, soldiers to

History of the Baptist Church at Norwich Vermont

In Norwich, as elsewhere, the Baptists were the first of the dissenting sects to contest the ground with the dominant New England orthodoxy. Soon after the settlement of the town we find mention made of Baptists here, and it is probable that a few of the very earliest settlers were of that faith. The following documents are transcribed from the town records: Willington [Ct.] October ye 6, 1780. “This may Certify all Persons whom it may Concern that Calvin Johnsen of Wellington is of the Baptist Persuasion and is one of the society of the Baptist Church in said Willington

First Settlements in Norwich Vermont

Having glanced thus briefly at the action of the Norwich proprietors in opening a way to reach their new township in the wilderness, and in dividing up a portion of its surface into lots suitable to become the homesteads of future settlers, let us pause a moment and see what had meantime been done in the work of actual settlement. I am indebted to Rev. Edmund F. Slafter of Boston for an interesting account of what was unquestionably the first attempt at settlement made within the limits of the town. I quote from the Slafter Memorial: “Samuel Slafter [of Mansfield,

Biographical Sketch of E. Chamberlin

E. Chamberlin was born in Windham county, Vermont, November 18, 1821. His father, Nathaniel Chamberlin, was a native of Worcester, Massachusetts. When he was eleven years old his parents moved to Bureau county, Illinois, where he was reared upon a farm and educated in the common schools. In 1852 he engaged in the grocery business, together with butchering and shipping stock. He was among the first settlers of Northern Illinois, and was in Chicago when there were but six houses in the town. In 1867 he came to Daviess county, and is now one of the leading farmers of this

Biographical Sketch of Arthur F. Chamberlin

(See Oolootsa) Arthur Fanshaw, son of Rev. Armory N. and Eunice Dolly (Hoyt) Chamberlain, was born October 9, 185 7 in Flint District. He was educated in the public schools and Male Seminary. Married June 9, 1883, at Neosho, Missouri, Letitia, daughter of Hamilton W., and Margaret Goodykoontz, born March 18. 1861, in Newton County, Missouri. They located in Vinita, and are the parents of. Dolly Edith (Cherokee name Oo-loo-tsa) born August 19, 1887; educated in the schools of Vinita, and Henry Kendall College; married June 22, 1907, William Robinson; Catherine Brown, born December 25, 1893; educated at Vinita and

Joseph Davis and Sarah Chamberlin

K123 JOSEPH DAVIS: 1647; m. Sarah Chamberlin. Had with other issue. K124 JOSEPH DAVIS: 1671; in. and had K125 JOSEPH DAVIS: 1697; m. (1), Sarah Curtiss; m. (2), Ruth Griggs. Had K126 JOSEPH DAVIS: 1725; m. Sarah Davis; had with other issue (1) Samuel: 1761—1835; m. Silence Jewett. (A) Samuel: 1790; m. Jane Benson. (a) Aaron: 1821. (B) Aaron: 1794; m. Electa Mumford. No ch. (2) Joseph: 1763—1855; m. Mary Foster. (A) James: 1795. (B) Joseph: 1803. (C) Ebenezer: 1811; m. Mrs. Sarah M. Foster. (a) Eben: 1860. (3) Moses: 1769—1854; m. Jemima Mclntire. (A) Jephthah: 1796—1863; m. Harriet Congar.

1830 Map of Cherokee Territory in Georgia

Biographies of the Cherokee Indians

Whatever may be their origins in antiquity, the Cherokees are generally thought to be a Southeastern tribe, with roots in Georgia, North Carolina, and Tennessee, among other states, though many Cherokees are identified today with Oklahoma, to which they had been forcibly removed by treaty in the 1830s, or with the lands of the Eastern Band of Cherokees in western North Carolina. The largest of the so-called Five Civilized Tribes, which also included Choctaws, Chickasaws, Creeks, and Seminoles, the Cherokees were the first tribe to have a written language, and by 1820 they had even adopted a form of government

Rough Riders

Rough Riders

Compiled military service records for 1,235 Rough Riders, including Teddy Roosevelt have been digitized. The records include individual jackets which give the name, organization, and rank of each soldier. They contain cards on which information from original records relating to the military service of the individual has been copied. Included in the main jacket are carded medical records, other documents which give personal information, and the description of the record from which the information was obtained.

Biography of Martin L. Chamberlin

MARTIN L. CHAMBERLIN. – This representative of the generation of young men born, or for the most part educated and developed, in our state, who are taking such a controlling part in her present rapid development, is the son of the well-known Joseph Chamberlin, who came to this coast in 1855, as missionary to the Indians, and in this capacity was of essential service to General Joel Palmer in getting the late hostile and still sullen and broken-spirited Indians upon the Grande Ronde Reservation. Martin, our subject, was born at Dryden, La Peer county, Michigan, May 17, 1846, and, being

Biography of Henry Eastman Chamberlin

Henry Eastman Chamberlin, the Superintendent of the Concord Street Railway, was born in Newbury, Vt., May 28, 1854, son of Charles and Ruth (Eastman) Chamberlin. His father was a native of Newbury, and his mother was born in Haverhill, N.H.; and he is a lineal descendant, on the maternal side, of Roger Eastman, the founder of the family in America. He attended the public schools of Newbury, Vt., and Haverhill, N.H., until he was fourteen years old. In 1869 he went to Union City, Ind., where he entered the employ of the Belle Fontaine Railroad Company as a messenger boy,