Biography of Aaron Freidenrich

Aaron Freidenrich, one of the most prominent merchants of Grangeville, and the managing member of the firm of Alexander & Freidenrich, wholesale and retail dealers in general merchandise, is in control of the largest establishment of the kind in the town, and perhaps no town of equal proportion in the entire country can boast of a better or more extensive store. The success of this enterprise is due to him whose name begins this sketch, a most energetic and progressive man, whose sound judgment is supplemented by industry and honorable methods. These qualities have brought to him a most creditable prosperity and have gained him a place in the foremost ranks of the commercial interests of northern Idaho.

Mr. Freidenrich has been a resident of this state for thirty-one years. He was born in Germany on the 24th of February 1851, a son of Isaac and Caroline (Adler) Freidenrich. Many of the representatives of the name were German merchants, and in religious faith the family were Hebrews. In the land of his nativity the subject of this sketch acquired his education, and also became familiar with business methods by acting as salesman in a mercantile establishment. He was only seventeen years of age when he emigrated to the United States, hoping to better his financial condition in the land where every opportunity is afforded the man of ability, ambition and determination. He landed in New York, and though he had but little knowledge of the English language he soon secured a position in a wholesale house in that city, where he remained until 1867, when he sailed for Portland, Oregon. There he remained for twelve months, and in 1868 he took up his abode in Lewiston, Idaho. There he obtained a position in the store of Hexter Brothers, with whom he continued until 1871, at which time he went to Florence and began merchandising on his own account. In 1874 he removed to Warren, where he conducted a store until 1879, when he sold his business there and took up his abode in Grangeville, becoming the managing member of the present firm of Alexander & Freidenrich. During his twenty-years connection with the business interests of Grangeville, he has met with splendid success, which has been well earned by his close attention to Iris commercial affairs, his excellent ability and his honorable business methods. The store which he occupies is thirty-five by one hundred and seventy-five feet, and in addition the firm has two large warehouses in Grangeville. The bills of sales have amounted to as high as five thousand dollars, and they carry a stock valued at eighty thousand dollars, to which they are making almost daily additions. They carry a full line of standard staple and fancy goods, and their finely equipped store would be a credit to a city of much greater size than Grangeville. In addition to this property Mr. Freidenrich has become the possessor of a number of good farms on Camas prairie, which are now rented. They are planted to hay and grain, and fine apples, cherries, plums and prunes are raised upon them. Thus he has judiciously invested his surplus earnings and thereby materially increased his income.

Mr. Freidenrich was happily married March 4, 1883, to Miss Rosa Stenhauser, a cultured lady, born in San Francisco, California. They have one son, Melton, who is now attending school in Portland, Oregon. Our subject is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and was for some years treasurer of Mount Idaho Lodge, No. 9, F. & A. M., now located at Grangeville. He also belongs to the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and is accounted one of Grangeville’s best businessmen and representative citizens. Although he came to America empty-handed, he is now the possessor of a handsome competence, his hopes having been more than realized. His life demonstrates the truth of the saying that success is not the result of genius, but the outcome of a clear judgment and experience.


Surnames:
Freidenrich,

Topics:
Biography,

Collection:
Illustrated History of the State of Idaho. Chicago: The Lewis Publishing Company. 1899.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Pin It on Pinterest

Scroll to Top