Thomas

More Victims of Anti-Slavery Act – Fugitive Slave Law

Columbia, Penn., (end of March, 1852;) a colored man, named William Smith, was arrested as a fugitive slave in the lumber yard of Mr. Gottlieb, by Deputy Marshal Snyder, of Harrisburg, and police officer Ridgeley, of Baltimore, under a warrant from Commissioner McAllister. Smith endeavored to escape, when Ridgeley drew a pistol and shot him …

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Genealogy of the Lewis family in America

About the middle of the seventeenth century four brothers of the Lewis family left Wales, viz.: Samuel, went to Portugal; nothing more is known of him; William, married a Miss McClelland, and died in Ireland, leaving only one son, Andrew; General Robert, died in Gloucester county, Va. ; and John, died in Hanover county, Va. It is Andrews descendants who are featured in the manuscript.

Janette Todd Thomas

THOMAS, Janette Todd8, (Street7, Hezekiah6, Hezekiah5, Caleb4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Aug. 17, 1817, died May 9, 1836, married Harry Thomas. Child: I. Ann, m. Minor Baldwin; had children.

Biography of Henry C. Thomas

HENRY C. THOMAS. James Township, Stone County, Missouri, has its full quota of vigorous, enterprising, thoroughgoing agriculturists, whose popularity is based upon both their social qualities and their well-known integrity and unusual industry. None among them is more popular or has worked more perseveringly than he of whom we write. Like at least one-half of …

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Genealogies of the First Settlers of Passaic Valley

Passaic Valley in New Jersey was first settled in the early 1700’s, primarily by families from Long Island, New York and Connecticut. The Family records, or, Genealogies of the first settlers of Passaic Valley and vicinity above Chatham provides genealogies of these early settlers from family records when they could be obtained, otherwise the author used family members to provide the information. Since some of the information comes from memory of individuals, one should validate what is written before relying on it to greatly.

1867 Plymouth County Massachusetts Directory, Oil and Candle Manufacturers to Pump Makers

Oil and Candle Manufacturers  Judd L. S., Marion Organ Manufacturers Reynolds P., N. Bridgewater Marston A. B. Campello, Bridgewater Oysters and Refreshments (See Eating Houses) Nash J. E. Abington Douglas W. East Abington Gilman A. N., Bridgewater Fuller John, Bridgewater Hull J. C., Bridgewater Tripp B. F., Middleboro Union Saloon, Middleboro Grover R. B., No. Bridgewater Washburn and …

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Weymouth ways and Weymouth people

Edward Hunt’s “Weymouth ways and Weymouth people: Reminiscences” takes the reader back in Weymouth Massachusetts past to the 1830s through the 1880s as he provides glimpses into the people of the community. These reminiscences were mostly printed in the Weymouth Gazette and provide a fair example of early New England village life as it occurred in the mid 1800s. Of specific interest to the genealogist will be the Hunt material scattered throughout, but most specifically 286-295, and of course, those lucky enough to have had somebody “remembered” by Edward.

Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

Descendants of Rev. James Keith of Bridgewater, MA

The name Keith has been a conspicuous one in the history of this Commonwealth since the first interior settlement was made, and the descendants of this time-honored family have been prominently identified with the development and growth of this community from the time of the ordination of the first minister of the settlement – Rev. James Keith, in 1664 – down to the present time, covering a period of nearly 250 years. This article is to treat particularly of the branch of descendants of Rev. James Keith to which belonged the late Simeon Cary Keith, who was an honored citizen of West Bridgewater, and his three sons, Warren R. Keith, who is president of the Independent Oil Company, of Brockton; Edward H. Keith, who is ex-mayor of the city of Brockton, and general inspector of the George E. Keith Company’s shoe factories; and S. Elliott Keith, who was a foreman in the extensive shoe manufacturing plant of the George E. Keith Company for a number of years and is now secretary of the Independent Oil Company. The ancestry of this branch of the family follows in chronological order.

Benjamin Thomas

Private, 1st Class, 168th Inf., 42nd Div., Co. A. Born in Wilson County; son of Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Thomas. Entered the service August 7, 1918, at Bennettsville, S. C. Was sent to Camp Wadsworth, S. C., and from there to Camp Stuart, Va. Sailed for France Sept. 15, 1918. Fought at Meuse-Argonne. Left …

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F. J. Thomas

1st Class Electrician, U. S. N. Born in Edgecombe County Aug. 27, 1896; son of R. W. and Annie Thomas. Entered the service at Richmond, Va., May 7, 1917. Promoted to the rank of 1st Electrician in 1919. On the U. S. S. Bulgaria three months, then transferred to U. S. S. Antigone, transport service. …

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