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Surname: McCoy

Notes on the McCoy Family

Notes on the McCoy Family

James McCoy (1720-1802), of Scottish lineage, immigrated about 1735 from Ireland to Pennsylvania, and served with Capt. Hyte in Kentucky or Tennessee. He later returned to Pennsylvania, and married Anne Bruce (born 1725 in Leochel-Cushnie, Aberdeenshire, Scotland and a descendant of Robert the Bruce), settling at Brown’s Fort (now Brownsville), Fayette County, Pennsylvania. Descendants and relatives lived in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, Missouri and elsewhere. Includes McCoy, Brown, Christian, Huston, Little, Mccormick, Mull, Payne, Taggart and related families.

Early Life in Colorado

Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

Fort Gibson in 1875

Establishment of Fort Gibson in 1824

By Act of Congress of March 2, 1819, Arkansas Territory was established July 4, embracing substantially all of what are now the states of Arkansas and Oklahoma; though the civil government of Arkansas Territory was limited to that section lying east of the Osage line, divided into counties, and embracing approximately the present state of Arkansas. That west of the Osage line was the Indian country, and in later years became known as Indian Territory. James Miller 1James Miller was born in Peterboro, N. H., April 25, 1776; entered the array as major in 1808, became Lieutenant-colonel in 1810, and

Worcester County MA Warnings

Brookfield Massachusetts Warnings 1737-1788

In the following information all the names, dates and other essential particulars which appear in the returns to the Court in the County of Worcester during the entire period – a full half-century, from 1737 to 1788 – in which these entries were made, are given. The returns from each place have been brought together and arranged under the name of the town or district, in this case Brookfield Massachusetts.

History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago counties, Iowa

History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago Counties, Iowa

History of Kossuth, Hancock, and Winnebago Counties, Iowa together with sketches of their cities, villages and townships, educational, civil, military and political history; portraits of prominent persons, and 641 biographies of representative citizens. Also included is a history of Iowa embracing accounts of the pre-historic races, and a brief review of its civil and military history.

1921 Farm Map of Melville Township, Audubon County, Iowa

1921 Farmers’ Directory of Melville Township

Abbreviations: Sec., section; ac., acres; Wf., wife; ch., children; ( ), years in county; O., owner; H., renter.   Anderson, L. A. Wf. Mathilda; ch.Emmert and Lucile. P. O. Audubon, R. 3. O. 160 ac., sec. 36. (18.) Breeder of Poland China Hogs. Andresen, Christ. Wf. Hansena; ch. Mary, Nina, Emil, Estra, Hu1ga and Hannah. P. O. Audubon,R. 3. R. 240 ac., sec. 26. (22.) Owner, H. M. McClanahan. Andrews, James. Wf. Allie; ch. Lois and Harvey. P. O. Audubon, R. 3. O. 160 ac., sec. 28. (37.) Breeder of Poland China Hogs and Holstein Cattle. Arts, John N. Wf.

Narrative of the Captivity of Mrs. Isabella M’coy – Indian Captivities

Narrative of the Captivity of Mrs. Isabella M’coy, who was taken Captive at Epsom, N. H., in the Year 1747. Collected From the Recollections of Aged People who knew her, by the Rev. Jonathan Curtis, a Minister of that Town, about Seventeen Years ago, and by Him Communicated to the Publishers of the New Hampshire Historical Collections. The Indians were first attracted to the new settlements in the town of Epsom, N. H., by discovering M’Coy at Suncook, now Pembroke. This, as nearly as can be ascertained, was in the year 1747. Reports were spread of the depredations of the

Treaty of 11 Feb 1837 - Page 1

Treaty of February 11, 1837

The said bands assent to the provisions of the treaties concluded on Aug. 5 and Sept 23, 1836, in which were ceded to the U.S. certain lands in the State of Indiana reserved for said bands by the treaties of Oct 26 and 27 1832, and hereby cede to the U.S. all their interest in said lands and agree to remove to a country that may be provided for them by the President of the U.S., SW of the Missouri river, within two years from the ratification of this treaty.

The U.S. agree to convey by patent to the Potawatomies of Indiana a tract of country, on the Osage river SW of the Missouri river sufficient in extent and adapted to their habits and wants.

The U.S. agree to purchase the “five sections in the prairie, near Rock Village” reserved for Qui-qui-to in the second article of the treaty of October 20th 1832 for the sum of $4,000.

Slave Narrative of James Lucas

Person Interviewed: James Lucas Location: Natchez Mississippi Place of Residence: Natchez, Adams County MS Date of Birth: October 11, 1833 James Lucas, ex-slave of Jefferson Davis, lives at Natchez, Adams County. Uncle Jim is small, wrinkled, and slightly stooped. His woolly hair is white, and his eyes very bright. He wears a small grizzled mustache. He is always clean and neatly dressed. “Miss, you can count up for yo’se’f. I was born on October 11, 1833. My young Marster give me my age when he heired de prope’ty of his uncle, Marse W.B. Withers. He was a-goin’ through de papers