Surname: George

Early Life in Colorado

Progressive Men of Western Colorado

This manuscript in it’s basic form is a volume of 948 biographies of prominent men and women, all leading citizens of Western Colorado. Western Colorado in this case covers the counties of: Archuleta, Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Garfield, Gunnison, Hinsdale, La Plata, Lake, Mesa, Mineral, Moffat, Montezuma, Montrose, Ouray, Pitkin, Rio Blanco, Routt, San Juan, and San Miguel.

Title page to the Aroostook War

Muster Roll of Captain Benjamin Beals’ Company

Muster Roll of Captain Benjamin Beals’ Company of Infantry in the Detachment of drafted Militia of Maine, called into actual service by the State, for the protection of its Northeastern Frontier, from the twenty-fifth day of February, 1839, the time of its rendezvous at Augusta, Maine, to the seventeenth day of April, 1839, when mustered.

Treaty of May 6, 1828, page 9

Disbursements to Cherokees under the Treaty of May 6, 1828

Abstract of disbursements and expenditures made by George Vashon, Indian Agent for the Cherokees west of the Mississippi, under the stipulations of the Treaty with said tribe of 6th May, 1828, between the 16th September, 1830, and the 31st December, 1833. In total this list represents 390 Cherokee families and 1835 individuals who each received 25.75 as part of their payment under the 5th article of the treaty of 6th May, 1828.

Knapp’s Mill, Norwich, Vermont

History of the Industries of Norwich VT

Although the products of the industries in Norwich have not been of great magnitude they have been quite varied in character. Such information in regard to these callings as we have been able to obtain we will present to our readers, though not in strict chronological order. Among the earliest establishments coming under this head was a grist mill established as early as 1770, by Hatch and Babcock on Blood Brook, on or near the site of the grist mill now operated by J. E. Willard, a short distance up the stream from where it empties into the Connecticut River.

An Artists rendition of James Smith

Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

Old Norfolk County Massachusetts Records

May 17, 1654, Jno Ward of Haverhill and wife Alice conveyed to Elizabeth Lilford of Haverhill (wife of Tho: Lilford) 4-acre house lot. Wit: Richard Littlehale and Rich: Ormsby. Ack. before Tho: Wiggin May 15, 1658. April 22, 1659, Robert Swan of Haverhill and wife Elizabeth, for £r6, conveyed to John Jonson of Haverhill 6 acres of houselot I bought of Mathias Button, bounded by Theophilus Satchwell, etc. Wit: Richard Littlehale and Mary Littlehale. Ack. before Symon Bradstreet Oct. 13, 1661. Oct. 12, 1661, Obadiah Eyer (his mark) of Haverhill and wife Hannah, for £5 l0s., conveyed to John Jonson

Theodore F. Jimerson (De-hah-teh), Cattaraugus Seneca

Cattaraugus Indian Reservation Map and Occupants, 1890

The Cattaraugus Reservation, in Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, and Erie Counties, New York, as delineated on the map, occupies both sides of Cattaraugus creek. It is 9.5 miles long on a direct east and west line, averages 3 miles in width at the center, dropping at is eastern line an additional rectangle of 2 by 3 miles. A 6-mile strip on the north and 2 “mile blocks” at diagonal corners are occupied by white people, and litigation is pending as to their rights and responsibilities. The Seneca Nation claims that the permit or grant under which said lands were occupied and improved

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Earnest George

(See Grant)-Ada, daughter of Joseph Lynch and Alice (Tucker) Thompson, born January 26, 1881, educated at Vinita and Female Seminary. Married at Vinita, December 8, 1909, Earnest George, born Nov. 26, 1881, in Cooper Co., Missouri. They are the parents of Mary Ellen George, born November 12, 1911. Mr. and Mrs. George are farming near Big Cabin. Mrs. Harriet M. Thompson wife of Joseph Lynch Thompson died Nov. 27, 1921. Stepmother of Ada Thompson, wife of Earnest E George.

Slave Narrative of George Fortman

Interviewer: Lauana Creel Person Interviewed: George Fortman Location: Evansville, Indiana Place of Residence: Cor. Bellemeade Ave. and Garvin St. Evansville, Indiana Occupation: Professor of faith in Christ, Janitor Ex-Slave Stories District 5 Vanderburgh County Lauana Creel INDIANS MADE SLAVES AMONG THE NEGROES. INTERVIEWS WITH GEORGE FORTMAN Cor. Bellemeade Ave. and Garvin St. Evansville, Indiana, and other interested citizens “The story of my life, I will tell to you with sincerest respect to all and love to many, although reviewing the dark trail of my childhood and early youth causes me great pain.” So spoke George Fortman, an aged man and

Slave Narrative of Octavia George

Person Interviewed: Octavia George Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Mansieur, Louisiana Date of Birth: 1852 Age: 85 I was born in Mansieur, Louisiana, 1852, Avoir Parish. I am the daughter of Alfred and Clementine Joseph. I don’t know much about my grandparents other than my mother told me my grandfather’s name was Fransuai, and was one time a king in Africa. Most of the slaves lived in log cabins, and the beds were home-made. The mattresses were made out of moss gathered from trees, and we used to have lots of fun gathering that moss to make those

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Estelle George

George, Mrs. Estelle (See Grant)—Ada, daughter of Joseph Lynch and Alice (Tuck­er) Thompson, born Jan. 26, 1881, educated at Vinita and Female Seminary. Married at Vinita, December 8, 1909, to Estel F. George, born Nov. 26, 1881, in Cooper County, Mis­souri. They are the parents of Mary Ellen George born November 12, 1911. Mr. and Mrs. George are farming near Big Cabin.

Biographical Sketch of C. E. George

C.E. George, of the firm of George & Coy, attorneys at law, was born at Alexandria, Grafton County, N.H., Dec. 20th, 1857. He received his education at the high school of Bristol, N.H., and the New London, N.H., and Newbury, Vt., Academies. He read law for two years with Hon. S.B. Page, at Woodville, Vt., and in 1879 graduated from the Vermont University, obtaining the degree of A.B. He also graduated from the law department of the Ann Arbor, Mich., University. He came to Odebolt, Ia., in March, 1880, and engaged in the practice of his profession. During the summer

Biographical Sketch of Hon. P. George Thomas

Hon. George P. Thomas, retired, is a native of Wyoming County, N. Y.; in the fall of 1856, came to Tekamah, bringing with him a steam saw-mill, which he located in the timber, two and a half miles east of this place. He operated it about one year, when it was destroyed by fire. He also engaged in farming and stock raising. He owns 520 acres, 300 of which are in cultivation. He built an elevator, and has been in the grain trade several years; was also in the drug business during 1876 and 1877. He, with Mr. Latta, built

Biography of Wilbur F. George

Wilbur F. George. With the exception of a short time spent in travel, Wilbur F. George had been a resident of Kansas since 1870, and during this time had been commensurately rewarded by the results which inevitably follow in the wake of industry, energy and careful management. Like many of his fellow agriculturists who have won success, he entered upon his career an a poor man, and whatever of success had come to him–and it is not inconsiderable–has beon attained solely through the medium of his own strength of purpose and hard labor. Mr. George, who is now a resident

Alvis O. George

1st Class Private, Med. Corps, Hospital Div.; of Halifax County; son of R. W. and Mary A. George. Entered service July 5, 1918, at Rosemary, N.C. Sent to Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga. Transferred to Hospital Gen. No. 1, New York. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., July 28, 1919.

William F. George

Educational Director, Navy, Bureau of Navigaton; of Surry County; son of T. M. and Mary (Critz) George. Husband of Frances (Sedberry) George. Entered service Nov. 1, 1918, at Washington, D. C. Sent to Quantico, Va. Received Serbian Medal of Merit. Mustered out at Camp Quantico, Va., May 10, 1920.

Olivia Todd George

GEORGE, Olivia Todd7, (Lyman6, Samuel5, Samuel4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) married(???)George. Child: I. Amasa, lived in Arkville, Delaware County, N. Y., Margaretville and Dry Brook, N. Y.

George, Charles F. – Obituary

Charles F. George Takes Own Life C.F. George, dairyman, who lived in the Missouri Flat district, shot himself in the head with a 22 rifle at his home last Friday at about the noon hour, and died at St. Elizabeth hospital in Baker about three hours later. Mr. George had been in poor health for some time suffering from a nervous breakdown and it is supposed this was the cause of the act. He was found by his wife and son Richard who returned from a trip to Haines. It is thought he had been shot about an hour when

George, Elizabeth Mrs. – Obituary

Mrs. Elizabeth George, age 88, died at the home of her daughter Mrs. J.H. Parker in Baker last Monday. She had been a resident of Baker 24 years. North Powder News Saturday, November 21, 1925

George, Ella Mrs.

Death Takes Widow of Pioneer Minister (By Halfway Correspondent) Milton, Feb. 4. – Mrs. Ella George, widow of Rev. David George, who died 15 years ago, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. C.D. Walters, here Monday night. Mrs. George was well known in the valley, having lived here the greater part of her life. She was born in Iowa in 1858 and crossed the plains when but a very small child coming with her parents first to California. In that state in 1875, she married the Rev. Mr. George, who was a circuit rider for the Methodist Episcopal