Surname: Burns

The genealogy and history of the Ingalls family in America

The genealogy and history of the Ingalls family in America

Edmund Ingalls, son of Robert, was born about 1598 in Skirbeck, Lincolnshire, England. He immigrated in 1628 to Salem, Massachusetts and with his brother, Francis, founded Lynn, Massachusetts in 1629. He married Ann, fathered nine children, and died in 1648.

Weymouth ways and Weymouth people

Weymouth ways and Weymouth people

Edward Hunt’s “Weymouth ways and Weymouth people: Reminiscences” takes the reader back in Weymouth Massachusetts past to the 1830s through the 1880s as he provides glimpses into the people of the community. These reminiscences were mostly printed in the Weymouth Gazette and provide a fair example of early New England village life as it occurred in the mid 1800s. Of specific interest to the genealogist will be the Hunt material scattered throughout, but most specifically 286-295, and of course, those lucky enough to have had somebody “remembered” by Edward.

1918 Warren County Farmers’ Directory – B Surnames

Abbreviations Used in this Directory a–Acres; Ch — Children; O–Owner; T–Tenant or Renter; R –Rural Route; Sec-Section; Maiden name of wife follows directory name in parentheses (); figures at end of information–year became resident of county. Star (*) indicates children not at home. Name of farm follows names of children in quotations marks. In case of a tenant, the farm owner’s name follows the figures giving size of farm. Example: ABBEY, William L. (Lena Riggs) Martha and Cora Abbey, Mother and Sister; Kirkwood R1 Tompking Sec8-5 T80a H.M. Abbey Est. (1886) Tel. Farmers’ Line Kirkwood MEANS ABBEY, William L. –

Title Page for Biographical and Portrait Cyclopedia of Chester County Pennsylvania

Biographical and Portrait Cyclopedia of Chester County, PA

Biographical and Portrait Cyclopedia of Chester County, Pennsylvania – comprising a historical sketch of the county, by Samuel T. Wiley, together with more than five hundred biographical sketches of the prominent men and leading citizens of the county.

History of Western Nebraska and its People

Biographies of Western Nebraska

These biographies are of men prominent in the building of western Nebraska. These men settled in Cheyenne, Box Butte, Deuel, Garden, Sioux, Kimball, Morrill, Sheridan, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Dawes counties. A group of counties often called the panhandle of Nebraska. The History Of Western Nebraska & It’s People is a trustworthy history of the days of exploration and discovery, of the pioneer sacrifices and settlements, of the life and organization of the territory of Nebraska, of the first fifty years of statehood and progress, and of the place Nebraska holds in the scale of character and civilization. In the

Descendants of Alexander Bisset Munro of Bristol, Maine

Alexander Bisset Munro was born 25 Dec. 1793 at Inverness, Scotland to Donald and Janet (Bisset) Munro. Alexander left Scotland at the age of 14, and lived in Dimecrana in the West Indies for 18 years. He owned a plantation, raising cotton, coffee and other produce. He brought produce to Boston Massachusetts on the ship of Solomon Dockendorff. To be sure he got his money, Solomon asked his to come home with him, where he met Solomon’s sister, Jane Dockendorff. Alexander went back to the West Indies, sold out, and moved to Round Pond, Maine, and married Jane. They had 14 children: Janet, Alexander, Margaret, Nancy, Jane, Mary, Solomon, Donald, John, William, Bettie, Edmund, Joseph and Lydia.

1923 Angola Indiana Directory Book Cover

1923 Historical and Pictorial Directory of Angola Indiana

Luedders’ historical and pictorial city directory of Angola, Indiana for the year 1923, containing an historical compilation of items of local interest, a complete canvass of names in the city, which includes every member of the family, college students, families on rural lines, directory of officers of county, city, lodges, churches, societies, a directory of streets, and a classified business directory.

Marcia Burns

Marcia Burns, Mrs. John Peter Van Ness

Marcia Burns! What memories the quaint Scotch lassie’s name calls up! The city of Washington disappears and its site spreads before us in flourishing farm lands and orchards. Scattered farm houses raise their chimneys amid primeval oaks and elms, and from the low doorway of the humblest emerges the winsome form of Marcia Burns. Six hundred acres, representing the thrift of generations of Scotch ancestors, surround her. The Potomac, one of the great water-ways of the South, carrying the produce of the fertile lands above into Alexandria for consumption or reshipment, almost kisses her feet. This is her patrimony, over