Blackburn

B Surnames – Walpole Massachusetts Marriage Records to 1850

BABBITT, Betsey and Samuel G. Clap, Mar. 8, 1843. Sarah P., 21, d. Willard and S., and Luther Hayward, widower [publishment of intention of marriage, omits widower], May 29, 1848. Sophia and George Copeland, Apr. 10, 1842. BACON, Alfred of Dover, and Harriett Perry, Nov. 27, 1834. Anna of Dedham, and William Kindall 1st, publishment […]

B Surnames – Walpole Massachusetts Marriage Records to 1850 Read More »

R. Blackburn

Private, 105th Supply Train, Co. C, 30th Div.; of Buncombe County; son of Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Blackburn. Entered service Sept. 19, 1917, at Asheville, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson. Transferred to Camp Sevier, then to Baltimore, Md., then to Wabash, Ind. Sailed for France June 11, 1918. Landed in USA April 11, 1919.

R. Blackburn Read More »

The Wilson Family of West Virginia

This brief history has been gleaned from old family records, correspondence with other members, and histories of Ritchie, Barbour, Harrison and Randolph Counties, West Virginia. The first known ancestor was David Wilson, who was born in Scotland about 1650; he had a son David, born about 1685, who was forced to flee from Scotland to Ireland owing to his being on the losing side in the Scotch Rebellion of 1715. His son William (b. Nov. 19, 1722; d. June 12, 1801) came to America about 1736; married Elizabeth Blackburn, also of Scotch-Irish descent, about 1746, and settled on Trout Run near Moorefield, Hardy County, W. Va. The Land Office at Richmond shows that he and his sons patented many tracts of land in what is now Hampshire, Hardy, and Grant Counties. Nothing further is known of him as to where he lived and died.

The Wilson Family of West Virginia Read More »

1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation Read More »

1923 Historical and Pictorial Directory of Angola Indiana

Luedders’ historical and pictorial city directory of Angola, Indiana for the year 1923, containing an historical compilation of items of local interest, a complete canvass of names in the city, which includes every member of the family, college students, families on rural lines, directory of officers of county, city, lodges, churches, societies, a directory of streets, and a classified business directory.

1923 Historical and Pictorial Directory of Angola Indiana Read More »

Brown Genealogy

In 1895, Cyrus Henry Brown began collecting family records of the Brown family, initially with the intention of only going back to his great-grandfathers. As others became interested in the project, they decided to trace the family lineage back to Thomas Brown and his wife Mary Newhall, both born in the early 1600s in Lynn, Massachusetts. Thomas, John, and Eleazer, three of their sons, later moved to Stonington, Connecticut around 1688. When North Stonington was established in 1807, the three brothers were living in the southern part of the town. Wheeler’s “History of Stonington” contains 400 records of early descendants of the Brown family, taken from the town records of Stonington. However, many others remain unidentified, as they are not recorded in the Stonington town records. For around a century, the descendants of the three brothers lived in Stonington before eventually migrating to other towns in Connecticut and New York State, which was then mostly undeveloped. He would eventually write this second volume of his Brown Genealogy adding to and correcting the previous edition. This book is free to search, read, and/or download.

Brown Genealogy Read More »

Vanderburgh County Indiana Will Abstracts, 1821-1873

Abstracts of over 600 wills for Vanderburgh County, Indiana, extracted by Mrs. Arthur C. Bitterman. Book A was typed by Mrs. James A. Gentry, book B typed by Mrs. Marvin J. Huff, and published as one by the Vanderburgh Chapter of the DAR. Book A primarily covers wills written or filed within the time period of 1823-1849 and book B includes the years of 1849-1873. In both cases there are wills that fall outside those dates.

Vanderburgh County Indiana Will Abstracts, 1821-1873 Read More »

Orange County, Virginia, will book I, 1735-1743

In the heart of Virginia, amidst the rolling hills and rich history, lies Orange County. Established in 1734, this vast expanse of land, originally stretching from the Rappahannock River to the Blue Ridge and further west to encompass what would become West Virginia and Kentucky, has been a witness to the early stories of America. “Orange County, Virginia, Will Book I, 1735-1743,” meticulously compiled by John Frederick Dorman and published in Washington, D.C., in 1958, serves as a crucial link to this foundational past.

Orange County, Virginia, will book I, 1735-1743 Read More »

Sevier County 1830 Tennessee Census

Published in Knoxville, Tennessee in 1956 and distributed by the Genealogical Publishing Company of Baltimore, Maryland, Sevier County, Tennessee: Population Schedule of the United States Census of 1830 (Fifth Census) provides a transcription of the often difficult to read, 1830 Sevier County Tennessee census. Authored by Blanche C. McMahon and Pollyanna Creekmore, this meticulous reproduction of the original census record sheds light on the people of Sevier County in 1830.

Sevier County 1830 Tennessee Census Read More »

Stephenson County Illinois World War 1 Veterans

This small booklet contains all the known men and women who participated in World War 1 and claimed their home of record as Stephenson County, Illinois. By participation, this record does not limit this to soldiers, but also contains the records of those men and women who served the Red Cross, Y.M.C.A., and other non-fighting positions. This book is free to read or download.

Stephenson County Illinois World War 1 Veterans Read More »

A History of Wayne County, Utah

“Rainbow Views: A History of Wayne County, Utah” offers an insightful journey through the history of Wayne County, compiled by Anne Snow. Published in 1953 by the Daughters of Utah Pioneers of Wayne County, this history explores various aspects of pioneer life and the development of the county. It covers the impact of early settlers, the evolution of industries such as cattle and sheep farming, dairying, and timber and lumbering, as well as the establishment of essential services like roads, schools, and medical facilities. The book also delves into the rich cultural heritage of the county, including its relations with Indigenous peoples, the formation of communities, and the role of religious and civic organizations.

A History of Wayne County, Utah Read More »

Scroll to Top