Glenn, Tolbert Thomas – Obituary

Summerville, Ore., Jan. 11, 1912 – Tolbert Thomas Glenn was born in Wapello, Iowa on June 22nd, 1844, and died at his home near Summerville, Oregon, on January the 6th instant. In 1862 he crossed the plains with his father and mother who settled in the Grande Ronde valley, where he has resided continuously since that time.

On Sept. 20th, 1868 he was married to Miss Sarah Myers who survives him.

The family of Mr. Glenn is now represented by Chas. A. Glenn of Lostine; William T., Arthur C. and Guy J. Glenn of Summerville; Mrs. Hattie McWilliams of Newcastle, California; Mrs. Daisy Settlemeir or Portland, Mrs. Mina Standley of Island City, and Miss Myra who resides in her parent’s home at Summerville.

Of the family to which Mr. Glenn belonged there are now living four sisters: Mrs. M. A. Woodward of Milton; Mrs. A. M. Rinehart of San Diego, Cal.; Mrs. C. C. Wells of Vale, Ore.; Mrs. I. Holland of Burns; and three brothers; Arthur, Frank and Walter of Malheur county, Oregon.

On Aug. 19th, 1895, at La Grande, the deceased with his wife, on confession of faith, united with the Presbyterian church, through the kind and helpful office of the Rev. G. H. Worthen, evangelist.

The internment took place at the Summerville cemetery at noon today.

Yours Sincerely,
Clinton H. Day
La Grande Evening Observer
Tuesday, January 16, 1912
Page 7


Tolbert Thomas GLENN, who passed away January 6, 1912, was for more than four decades actively identified with general agricultural pursuits in Union county, accumulating more than fifteen hundred acres of valuable land. His birth occurred in Wapello, Iowa, on the 22d of June, 1844, his parents being William S. and Maria (Yates) Glenn. The father, who was engaged in merchandising at Pleasantville, Iowa, for some years, crossed the plains to the northwest in 1862, locating in the Grande Ronde valley and taking up government land near Summerville, Union county. He divides his time between farming and freighting, hauling goods from Portland and Umatilla to the mines of Idaho. In 1871 he removed to the city of Malheur, where he was engaged in the mercantile business, and later organized the town of Vale. His demise, which occurred at Vale, on the 9th of May 1900 was the occasion of deep and widespread regret, for he had won many friends during the long period of his residence in this state. It was while still a resident of Iowa that he lost his wife, who passed away in 1849.
Tolbert T. Glenn obtained his education in the schools of his native state and after coming to the Grande Ronde valley worked with his father in the freighting business until 1868. In that year he embarked in business as an agriculturist on his own account, taking up land a mile and a half from Summerville and turning his attention to the pursuits of farming and stock-raising, in which he was busily engaged throughout the remainder of his life. That he prospered in his undertakings is indicated by the fact that he accumulated some fifteen hundred acres of land, over one thousand acres of the same being under cultivation. In connection with the production of cereals he raised fine horses and cattle, and the secret of his prosperity doubtless lay in the fact that he was very industrious and painstaking as well as a man of excellent business ability. His fertile farm was most attractively located and royally responded to the care and labor, which he bestowed upon it.
On the 20th of September 1868, in the Grande Ronde valley, Mr. Glenn was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Meyers [Myers], a daughter of Henry and Louisa Meyers [Myers], who were natives of North Carolina and Maryland respectively. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Glenn were born the following children: C. Edwin; William; Arthur; Guy J., a sketch of whom appears below; Willard B., who is deceased; Hattie; Daisy; Mina; and Myra.
Mr. Glenn was a democrat in his political views and held the offices of supervisor and school director. He was faithful to those to whom he gave his friendship, was loyal in his citizenship and true to every trust, but his best traits of character were reserved for his own home and fireside and there it is that his loss will be most deeply felt.

The Centennial History Of Oregon
Vol III Gaston
R 979.1 G 256c
Page 114
Contributed by: Tom Childers

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