Algonquian

Monacan Tribe

Monacan Indians (possibly from an Algonquian word signifying a digging stick or spade). A tribe and confederacy of Virginia in the 17th century. The confederacy occupied the upper waters of James river above the falls at Richmond. Their chief village was Rasawek. They were allies of the Manahoac and enemies of the Powhatan, and spoke …

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Nipissing Tribe

Nipissing Indians, Nipissing Nation, Nipissing First Nation, Nipissing People (‘at the little water or lake’, referring to Lake Nipissing; Nipisirinien, ‘little-water people’). A tribe of the Algonkin. When they first became known to the French, in 1613, they were residing in the vicinity of Lake Nipissing, Ontario, which has been their home during most of the time …

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Noquet Tribe

Noquet Indians (No´ke, ‘bear foot’; another name for the Bear gens (see Noka) of the Chippewa. W. J.) An Algonquian tribe located by the earliest French writers about Noquet bay, at the mouth of Green Bay, extending north across the peninsula to Lake Superior.  In 1659 they were attached to the mission at St. Michel, …

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Ononchataronon Tribe

Ononchataronon Indians, Ononchataronon Nation, Ononchataronon First Nation, Ononchataronon People (Huron name). An Algonkin tribe or band that occupied the district near Montreal, Canada, between St Lawrence and Ottawa rivers, and wintered near the Hurons. In 1642 they were but a remnant. They claimed to have been the original occupants of Montreal Island and of a large territory …

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Manahoac Tribe

Manahoac Indians (Algonquian: ‘they are very merry.’ – Tooker). A confederacy or group of small tribes or bands possibly Siouan, in north Virginia, in 1608, occupying the country from the falls of the rivers to the mountains and from the Potomac to North Anna river. They were at war with the Powhatan and Iroquois, and …

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Matinecoc Tribe

Matinecoc Indians. An Algonquian tribe which formerly inhabited the northwest coast of Long Island, New York, from Newtown, Queens county, to Smithtown, Suffolk county. They had villages at Flushing, Glen Cove, Cold Spring, Huntington, and Cow Harbor, but even before the intrusion of the whites they had become greatly reduced, probably through wars with the …

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Mattabesec Tribe

Mattabesec Indians (from massa-sepuēs-et, ‘at a [relatively] great rivulet or brook. Trumbull). An important Algonquian tribe of Connecticut, formerly occupying both banks of Connecticut river from Wethersfield to Middletown or to the coast and extending westward indefinitely. The Wongunk, Pyquaug, and Montowese Indians were apart of this tribe. According to Ruttenber they were a part …

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Hatteras Tribe

Hatteras Indians. An Algonquian tribe living in 1701 on the sand banks of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina east of Pamlico sound, and frequenting Roanoke Island.  Their single village, Sandbanks, had them only about 80 inhabitants.  They showed traces of white blood and claimed that some of their ancestors were white.  They may have been identical …

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Machapunga Tribe

Machapunga Indians (‘bad dust’; from matchi ‘bad’, pungo ‘dust’ (Heckewelder), or perhaps ‘much dust,’ from massa ‘great’, in allusion to the sandy soil of the district). An Algonquian tribe formerly living in Hyde county, north east North Carolina. In 1701 they numbered only about 30 warriors, or perhaps 100 souls, and lived in a single …

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Algonquian Indians

Algonquian Family (adapted from the name of the Algonkin tribe). A linguistic stock which formerly occupied a more extended area than any other in North America. Their territory reached from the east shore of Newfoundland to the Rocky Mountains and front Churchill River to Pamlico sound. The east parts of this territory were separated by …

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Coree Tribe

Coree Indians. A tribe, possibly Algonquian, formerly occupying the peninsulas of Neuse river, in Carteret and Craven counties, North Carolina. They had been greatly reduced in a war with another tribe before 1696, and were described by Archdale as having been a bloody and barbarous people. Lawson refers to them as Coranine Indians, but in …

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