Topic: 1890 Census

1910 New York Census Map

Cayuga County New York Census Records

Cayuga County New York Census Records – Search and view the US Federal Census Images from 1790-1940 for Cayuga County, New York for free. Also provided are lists of any state census available online for Cayuga County NY.

1910 New York Census Map

Seneca County New York Census Records

Seneca County New York Census Records – Search and view the US Federal Census Images from 1790-1940 for Seneca County, New York for free. Also provided are lists of any state census available online for Seneca County NY.

Chief Cornplanter

Condition of New York Indians in the 1890 Census

This collection of material provides an extensive look into the New York Indian tribes as they existed in 1890. While some attention is given to the remnants of the Long Island Indians, most of the material is specific to the Six Nations. The data includes maps of the Reservations, and lists and photographs of occupants of those reservations in 1890.

Horse Thief, Mescalero Apache Indian

Mescalero Apache Reservation

The area of New Mexico was acquired by the United States by capture and the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo of February 2, 1818, and the Gadsden purchase of December 30, 1853. The Indians discovered therein by the Spaniards in 1539 were the Pueblos, or Towndwellers, along the Rio Grande or on streams tributary to it, the Apaches, in the south and west, some Utes in the north, with occasional foraging parties of Comanches, Pawnees, Sioux, and others. The Texan Indians, including the Lipans (Apaches), frequently roamed the southeastern portion and down into Mexico. The Navajos (Apaches) were the fierce and

Map Showing Location of Pueblos in New Mexico

Condition of the New Mexico Indians in 1890

This is an extensive report on the conditions affecting the New Mexico Pueblos in 1890. It provides an interesting look into the culture and life in Pueblo villages at the turn of the Nineteenth Century. It describes the conditions in which the various Pueblo people live: their houses, food, farming, dances, etc.

Condition of the Nevada Indians in 1890

The Moapa River reservation has no subagent. It is a small reservation, 1,000 acres, in southeastern Nevada, and is a mere rallying point for wandering Shoshone Indians. It is nominally attached to the Nevada agency. The civilized (self-supporting) Indians of Nevada, counted in the general census, number 3,599 (1,913 males and 1,686 females), and are distributed as follows: Churchill County, 230; Douglas County, 117; Elko County, 301; Esmeralda, County, 406; Eureka County, 194; Humboldt County, 425; Lander County, 382; Lincoln County, 355; Nye County, 414; Ormsby County, 134; Storey County, 100; Washoe County, 303; White Pine County, 238. These Indians

Condition of the Nebraska Indians in 1890

The Flandreau Sioux (Santee), who are Indians taxed, are not on a reservation, but are attached to the Santee agency for the purpose of government aid only. They own their lands and are citizens, voting in South Dakota. During 1889 rations were issued to them for 6 months because of failure of crops. The civilized (self-supporting) Indians of Nebraska, counted in the general census, number 2,893 (1,480 males and 1,413 females), and are distributed as follows: Boyd County, 107; Cuming County, 39; Knox County, 625; Nance County, 201; Thurston, County, 1,898; other Counties (5 or less in each), 23. Agencies

Condition of the Mississippi Indians in 1890

The civilized (self-supporting) Indians of Mississippi, counted in the general census, number 2,030 (1,044 males and 992 females), and are distributed as follows: Attala County, 24; Greene County, 37; Hancock County, 39; Hinds County, 14; Jasper County, 179; Kemper County, 34; Lauderdale County, 14; Leake County, 435; Neshoba, County, 623; Newton County, 349; Perry County, 38; Scott County, 123; Sharkey County 12; Winston County, 41; other counties (9 or less in each), 74. To the east of the gate capital in Mississippi in the uplands are a number of counties not traversed by any railroad, and therefore locally known as

Condition of the Maine Indians in 1890

The civilized (self-supporting) Indians of Maine, counted in the general census, number 559 (299 males and 260 females), and are distributed as follows: Aroostook County, 24; Penobscot County, 387; Piscataquis County, 37; Washington County, 89; other counties (9 or less in each), 22. The United States has no dealings with the Indians of Maine as tribes. The Penobscot Indians have their headquarters at Old Town and dwell chiefly along the Penobscot river in the county of the same name. The state of Maine has an agent for them, and the state treasurer reports $11,026.70 paid out on their account in

1890 Census Guide – Questions & Information

The census of 1890 was taken, under the supervision of Robert P. Porter,14 according to an act of March 1, 1889, and modeled after that used for the 1880 Census. The enumeration began on June 2, 1890, because June 1 was a Sunday. The census employed 175 supervisors, with one or more appointed to each state or territory, exclusive of Alaska and Indian territory. Each subdivision assigned to an enumerator was not to exceed 4,000 inhabitants. Enumeration was to be completed in cities with populations under 10,000 (according to the 1880 Census results) was to be completed within 2 weeks.