Surname: Wilkins

Ancestry Chart for Sarah Stone

The Ancestry of Sarah Stone

The ancestry of Sarah Stone, wife of James Patten of Arundel (Kennebunkport) Maine
Contains also the Dixey, Hart, Norman, Neale, Lawes, Curtis, Kilbourne, Bracy, Bisby, Pearce, Marston, Estow and Brown families.

Ancestor Register of Esther Steelman Adams

A Genealogy of the Lake Family

A genealogy of the Lake family of Great Egg Harbour in Old Gloucester County in New Jersey : descended from John Lade of Gravesend, Long Island; with notes on the Gravesend and Staten Island branches of the family. This volume of nearly 400 pages includes a coat-of-arms in colors, two charts, and nearly fifty full page illustrations – portraits, old homes, samplers, etc. The coat-of-arms shown in the frontspiece is an unusually good example of the heraldic art!

Clermont, Osage Chief

Western Garrison Life

Grant Foreman describes the early life in a Western Garrison; providing insights on some of the traders in the region, the deaths of Seaton, Armstrong, Wheelock and Izard, all soldiers obviously familiar to him. But he also shares the story of the elopement of Miss Sarah Knox Taylor, daughter of General Taylor, to Lieutenant Jefferson Davis… yes, THAT Jefferson Davis.

An interesting section of the chapter are the references to the punishments inflicted upon the soldiers in the event of their disobedience.

Painted by Catlin in 1834, the picture attached is of Clermont, chief of the Osage Tribe. Clermont is painted in full length, wearing a fanciful dress, his leggings fringed with scalp-locks, and in his hand his favorite and valued war-club.

Walkover Shoe

Descendants of Rev. James Keith of Bridgewater MA

The Keith family of the region of country in and about the Bridgewaters, members of which have been most prominent and influential there from the beginning, is as ancient as are the settlements there. Bridgewater, as originally, was the first interior settlement in the Old Colony, the grant of the plantation being made in 1645, but the actual settlement was not commenced until after 1650, the first lots being taken up in the West Parish, and there the first house was built and the first improvements made, the proprietors and inhabitants practically all coming from Duxbury. From the ancient town

Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont vol 1

Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

Pioneers of the Seneca County Medical Society

An Historical Sketch of the Seneca County Medical Society

At the anniversary meeting of the Seneca County Medical Society held at Waterloo, July 23, 1885, a resolution was introduced by Dr. S. R. Welles, and adopted by the Society, that a committee be appointed which should prepare biographical sketches of members of the Society from its earliest history to the present time. As a result, this manuscript was published which includes 75 biographies of the early pioneers of the Seneca County Medical Society.

An Account of the Sufferings of Mercy Harbison – Indian Captivities

On the 4th of November, 1791, a force of Americans under General Arthur St. Clair was attacked, near the present Ohio-Indiana boundary line, by about the same number of Indians led by Blue Jacket, Little Turtle, and the white renegade Simon Girty. Their defeat was the most disastrous that ever has been suffered by our arms when engaged against a savage foe on anything like even terms. Out of 86 officers and about 1400 regular and militia soldiers, St. Clair lost 70 officers killed or wounded, and 845 men killed, wounded, or missing. The survivors fled in panic, throwing away their weapons and accoutrements. Such was “St. Clair’s defeat.”

The utter incompetency of the officers commanding this expedition may be judged from the single fact that a great number of women were allowed to accompany the troops into a wilderness known to be infested with the worst kind of savages. There were about 250 of these women with the “army” on the day of the battle. Of these, 56 were killed on the spot, many being pinned to the earth by stakes driven through their bodies. Few of the others escaped captivity.

After this unprecedented victory, the Indians became more troublesome than ever along the frontier. No settler’s home was safe, and many were destroyed in the year of terror that followed. The awful fate of one of those households is told in the following touching narrative of Mercy Harbison, wife of one of the survivors of St. Clair’s defeat. How two of her little children were slaughtered before her eyes, how she was dragged through the wilderness with a babe at her breast, how cruelly maltreated, and how she finally escaped, barefooted and carrying her infant through days and nights of almost superhuman exertion, she has left record in a deposition before the magistrates at Pittsburgh and in the statement here reprinted.

1894 Michigan State Census – Eaton County

United States Soldiers of the Civil War Residing in Michigan, June 1, 1894 [ Names within brackets are reported in letters. ] Eaton County Bellevue Township. – Elias Stewart, Frank F. Hughes, Edwin J. Wood, Samuel Van Orman, John D. Conklin, Martin V. Moon. Mitchell Drollett, Levi Evans, William Fisher, William E. Pixley, William Henry Luscomb, George Carroll, Collins S. Lewis, David Crowell, Aaron Skeggs, Thomas Bailey, Andrew Day, L. G. Showerman, Hulbert Parmer, Fletcher Campbell, Lorenzo D. Fall, William Farlin, Francis Beecraft, William Caton, Servitus Tucker, William Shipp, Theodore Davis. Village of Bellevue. – William H. Latta, Thomas B.

Augustus A. Bass, Nansamond

Nansemond Tribe

A brief history of the Nansemond Indians who resided at Portsmouth, Bowers Hill, and in general about Dismal Swamp, Virginia. Includes last names of living descendants.

Biography of Joseph Wilkins

Joseph Wilkins, a resident of Pembroke and a veteran of the Civil War, was born May 24, 1844, son of Jeremiah Hall and Mary (Thompson) Wilkins. He is not only a representative of an old New Hampshire family, but a lineal descendant of ancestors who were first settlers in this country. Bray Wilkins, who came from Wales, Brecknock County, was a descendant of Lord John Wilkins, who belonged to a family that traced their lineage back to 1090 and had borne many honorable titles. Lord John was a connection of the Bishop Wilkins who married the sister of the Protector,

Biography of Gustavus Charles Wilkins

Forty-two years ago Gustavus Charles Wilkens, a native of the fair land of Poland, left the dominion of the Czar to seek his fortune in America, and being favorably impressed with the possibilities open to him in this country he lost no time in renouncing his allegiance to the Russian government. Mr. Wilkens belongs to a race of liberty-loving people who have long cherished an ardent desire to regain their national independence, but the iron hand of imperial Russia still holds them in subjection. His father, Ludwig Wilkens, born in 1801, was in the service of the Russian government, having

Biographical Sketch of J. Reuben B. Wilkins

Wilkins, J. Reuben B., Ferrisburgh, Vergennes p. o., was born in Vergennes, Vt., September 18, 1834. He is a general farmer, town superintendent of schools, and a graduate of the University of Vermont in the class of 1855. In 1856 he read law with W. W. Peck, esq., in Burlington, Vt., and was admitted to the bar at Albany, N. Y., in 1857. He was married in 1859 to Harriet E. Guinnip, daughter of Matthias B. and Margaret (Pinney) Guinnip, residents of Watkins, Schuyler county, N. Y. Three children were born to them in Ferrisburgh, Vt. — Anna M., Daniel

Biography of Jonathan Wilkins

Jonathan Wilkins, one of the earliest inhabitants of Athens, was a man of very considerable learning, and for some time taught a pioneer school. Of his son, Timothy Wilkins, the following reminiscence is furnished by Dr. C. F. Perkins; it is hardly less strange than the history immortalized by Tennyson in 11 Enoch Arden.” Mr. Wilkins was skillful and enterprising in business, but, through no fault of his own, became embarrassed, was hard pressed by creditors, and pursued by writs. In those days, when a man could be imprisoned for a debt of ten dollars, to fail in business was

Biographical Sketch of W. L. Wilkins

W.L. Wilkins, dealer in agricultural implements, came to Sioux City in 1870, and soon afterwards engaged in business, under the firm name of Davis & Wilkins; next as Wilkins Bros.; subsequently W.L. Wilkins became sole proprietor. He has one of the leading establishments of the kind in the city. He handles all first class machinery, such as McCormick’s, N.C. Thompson and J.I. Case’s various machinery, Harrison and Whitewater wagons, Racine wagon and carriage company’s goods, windmills, barbed wire, and is also a dealer in grain.

Biographical Sketch of Bert LeRoy Wilkins

Wilkins, Bert LeRoy; manufacturer; born, LaGrange, O., Dec. 11, 1869; son of H. J. and Anna Rowell Wilkins; educated, LaGrange public school and Oberlin Business College; married, LaGrange, O., Nov. 27, 1889, Lucy A. Richmond; issue, one daughter, Ada Vera; organized the partnership of Wilkins & Rawson, February, 1890; Lakewood Plumbing Co., 1903; Lakewood Wash Tray Co., 1906; consolidated the above with Euclid Stove & Brick Co., June, 1912; sec’y The Euclid Stove & Brick Co.; partner The Lakewood Plumbing Co.; director Colonial Savings & Loan Co.; Lakewood Lodge, F. & A. M.; Cunningham Chapter, R. A. M.; Forest City

Harvey N. Wilkins

Private, M. G. Co., 30th Div., 119th Regt.; of Stokes County; son of Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Wilkins. Entered service Sept. 20, 1917, at Danbury, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson, transferred to Camp Sevier, Greenville, S. C., then to Camp Merritt, N. J. Sailed for France May 28, 1918. On Ypres Front Aug. 19th to Sept. 1st; Bellicourt Sept. 29, 1918; Busigny Oct. 8th; Mazinghein Oct. 17th. Returned to USA April 2nd. Mustered out at Camp Jackson April 7, 1919.

Charlie V. Wilkins

Mechanic, Co. M, 30th Div., 120th Regt.; of Durham County; son of C. B. and Mrs. D. Wilkins. Entered service in 1917 at Durham, N.C. Sent to Camp Sevier, S. C. Sailed for France May 17, 1918. Killed at Battle of Hindenburg Line Sept. 29, 1918. Buried at Bony Aisne, No. 636, American Cemetery.

Rough Riders

Rough Riders

Compiled military service records for 1,235 Rough Riders, including Teddy Roosevelt have been digitized. The records include individual jackets which give the name, organization, and rank of each soldier. They contain cards on which information from original records relating to the military service of the individual has been copied. Included in the main jacket are carded medical records, other documents which give personal information, and the description of the record from which the information was obtained.

Biography of Uriah Wilkins

Uriah Wilkins, born at Amherst, N. H., married Nancy Kitridge, of that town, and at an early day immigrated to Stowe, where he reared a family of eight children, as follows : Uriah, Nancy, George, Fanny K., Charles A., Elizabeth W., Ingalls, and Mary E. Uriah resides in Stowe, a retired farmer. Nancy died of consumption. George is a practicing attorney of this town. Fanny K. is the wife of Nathaniel Robinson. Charles A. resides in Milford, N. H. Elizabeth W. is the widow of John B. Seaver, and resides in Cambridge village. Ingalls died in California. Mary E. died