Surname: Wilkerson

Genealogical record of Thomas Wait and his descendants

Genealogical Record of Thomas Wait and his descendants

Genealogical Record of Thomas Wait and his descendants looks at the genealogy of Thomas Wait (1601-1677) who was from Wethersfield Parish, Essex, England. On his arrival in America, landing in Rhode Island, he applied for a lot on which to build,and was granted it on 7/1/1639. On 3/l6/l641 he became a Freeman in Newport R. I. He died in Portsmouth R. I., before April 1677 intestate. This Thomas Wait was a cousin to the Richard Waite of Watertown Mass., who was a large land owner. This unpublished manuscript provides the descendants of this family.

Rebecca Mitchell Proctor Grave Marker

Cotton County Oklahoma Cemeteries

Most of these Cotton County Oklahoma cemeteries are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we provide the listing when it is only a partial listing. Hosted at Cotton County OKGenWeb Archives Devol Cemetery Elm Grove Cemetery Fairview Cemetery, Randlett Fairview Cemetery 2 Temple Cemetery Abell-Gutierrez Surnames Hackett-Oxford Surnames Pack-Zerkle Surnames Partial Extract Walters Cemetery Wilkerson Cemetery Hosted at Oklahoma Cemeteries Elm Grove Cemetery aka New Salem Cemetery Fairview Cemetery aka Randlett Cemetery Temple Masonic Cemetery Walters Cemetery Wilkerson Cemetery Hosted at Cotton County Oklahoma interment.net Lonestar Cemetery aka Hooper Cemetery Temple Masonic Cemetery A – C Surnames

George Rogers Clark

Moravian Massacre at Gnadenbrutten

In the early part of the year 1763 two Moravian missionaries, Post and Heckewelder, established a mission among the Tuscarawa Indians, and in a few years they had three nourishing missionary stations, viz: Shoenbrun, Gnadenbrutten and Salem, which were about five miles apart and fifty miles west of the present town of Steubenville, Ohio. During our Revolutionary War their position being midway between the hostile Indians (allies of the British) on the Sandusky River, and our frontier settlements, and therefore on the direct route of the war parties of both the British Indian allies and the frontier settlers, they were

Columbus Landing on Hispaniola

The Discovery Of This Continent, it’s Results To The Natives

In the year 1470, there lived in Lisbon, a town in Portugal, a man by the name of Christopher Columbus, who there married Dona Felipa, the daughter of Bartolome Monis De Palestrello, an Italian (then deceased), who had arisen to great celebrity as a navigator. Dona Felipa was the idol of her doting father, and often accompanied him in his many voyages, in which she soon equally shared with him his love of adventure, and thus became to him a treasure indeed not only as a companion but as a helper; for she drew his maps and geographical charts, and also

Genealogy of the Cherokee Wilkerson Family

Instructions on how to interpret this information 11 Coo-ta-ya. Edward Wilkerson and John Wilkerson 1112 Eliza Wilkerson. Jesse Bushyhead ________ 2 Aaron Wilkerson 3 Richard Wilkerson* 4 James Wilkerson* 5 George Wilkerson.  Susan Poorbear 6 John Wilkerson. Annie Woods 151 John Wilkerson. Rebecca Oglesby 2 Riley Wilkerson* 3 James Monroe Wilkerson. Nancy Jane Keys 4 George Wilkerson 5 Laura Wells Wilkerson  Wilson Sanders 6 Eliza Wilkerson   John Ross 7 Leonard Worcester Wilkerson. Ellen Bible 8 Mary Wilkerson. John Henry Coody 116218 Martha Wilkerson*  John Groom 2 Nannie Wilkerson*  Solomon Ray 3 Mary Wilkerson. Charles Jones 4  Elizabeth Wilkerson. Mack Messer

Montgomery Co., Ky

MONTGOMERY CO. (Gladys Robertson) In this community most of the slaves were kept on farms and each family was given a well constructed log house. They were fed by provisions given them by their white masters and they were plentiful. They were clothed by their masters. These clothes were made by the colored women under the direction and supervision of their mistress, the white woman cut the clothes for both men and women, and the colored women did the sewing of the garments. The men did the manual labor on the farm and the women the domestic. Each white woman

Hodgen Cemetery, LeFlore County, Oklahoma

Hodgen Cemetery, Hodgen, LeFlore County, Oklahoma

To get to Hodgen Cemetery take Hwy #59 south from the main intersection in Hodgen about 1/2 mi, then right. This is the cemetery for the town of Hodgen, and still active. Our thanks to Paula Doyle-Bicket for the submission of these cemeteries to our online collection. [box]Source: Copyright © 2004, by Paula Doyle-Bicket. All Rights Reserved[/box]

Slave Narrative of Bert Luster

Person Interviewed: Bert Luster Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Watson County, Tennessee Date of Birth: 1853 Age: 85 I’ll be jest frank, I’m not for sho’ when I was born, but it was in 1853. Don’t know the month, but I was sho’ born in 1853 in Watson County, Tennessee. You see my father was owned by Master Luster and my mother was owned by Masters Joe and Bill Asterns (father and son). I can remember when Master Astern moved from Watson County, Tennessee he brought me and my mother with him to Barnum County Seat, Texas. Master

Slave Narrative of Charlotte Martin

Interviewer: Alfred Farrell Person Interviewed: Charlotte Martin Location: Live Oak, Florida Occupation: Farmed, made quilts, and made herb cures. Charlotte Mitchell Martin, one of twenty children born to Shepherd and Lucinda Mitchell, eighty-two years ago, was a slave of Judge Wilkerson on a large plantation in Sixteen, Florida, a little town near Madison. Shepherd Mitchell was a wagoner who hauled whiskey from Newport News, Virginia for his owner. Wilkerson was very cruel and held them in constant fear of him. He would not permit them to hold religious meetings or any other kinds of meetings, but they frequently met in

Biography of Robert A. Wilkerson

Since 1915 Robert A. Wilkerson has resided in Pryor and he is recognized as one of the prominent and representative members of the Oklahoma bar. He was born near Carthage, Smith county, Tennessee, on the 30th of January, 1884, a son of James A. and Elizabeth (Hale) Wilkerson, both natives of Tennessee and still living. The father is actively engaged in farming and has won substantial success in that connection. Five sons and four daughters have been born to their union, of whom Robert A. is the youngest. On reaching school age Robert A. Wilkerson attended the public schools of