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Ancestry of Walter Lyman French

Most of the Frenches of the Bridgewaters and vicinity descend from John French, of Braintree. This John French was born about 1612, in England. Before coming to Braintree, of which point he was an inhabitant in 1640, and a freeman in 1644, he had been a short time at Dorchester. He died Aug. 16, 1692, aged about eighty. His wife Grace died Feb. 28, 1680-81, aged fifty-nine years. Walter Lyman French, the gentleman whose name introduces this article was one of Brockton’s enterprising business men, one who had achieved marked success in various branches of industry and trade. He was born in Brockton Mass. (then North Bridgewater) May 4, 1843, son of the late Francis M. and. Nancy L. (Blake) French. Walter is a direct descendant of John and Grace French of Braintree Mass.

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Marriages of Orange County, Virginia, 1747-1810

Catherine Lindsay Knorr’s Marriages of Orange County, Virginia, 1747-1810 stands as a pivotal work for genealogists and historians delving into the rich tapestry of Virginia’s past. Published in 1959, this meticulously compiled volume sheds light on the matrimonial alliances formed within Orange County, Virginia, during a period that was crucial to the shaping of both local and national histories. The absence of a contemporary marriage register presented a formidable challenge, yet through exhaustive examination of marriage bonds, ministers’ returns, and ancillary records, Knorr has reconstructed a reliable record of these marriages.

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Brown Genealogy

In 1895, Cyrus Henry Brown began collecting family records of the Brown family, initially with the intention of only going back to his great-grandfathers. As others became interested in the project, they decided to trace the family lineage back to Thomas Brown and his wife Mary Newhall, both born in the early 1600s in Lynn, Massachusetts. Thomas, John, and Eleazer, three of their sons, later moved to Stonington, Connecticut around 1688. When North Stonington was established in 1807, the three brothers were living in the southern part of the town. Wheeler’s “History of Stonington” contains 400 records of early descendants of the Brown family, taken from the town records of Stonington. However, many others remain unidentified, as they are not recorded in the Stonington town records. For around a century, the descendants of the three brothers lived in Stonington before eventually migrating to other towns in Connecticut and New York State, which was then mostly undeveloped. He would eventually write this second volume of his Brown Genealogy adding to and correcting the previous edition. This book is free to search, read, and/or download.

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Descendants of John Washburn of Duxbury, MA

The Washburn name in this country is a distinguished one. Perhaps it is as yet only a tradition that John Washburn, the ancestor of the Washburns here considered, was he who first served as secretary of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Several governors of our States have borne the Washburn name and at one and the same time four of the name occupied seats in the United States Congress. And the branch of the Massachusetts Washburns seated in Middleboro and vicinity have borne no small part in the annals of the Old Colony and later Commonwealth. Capt. Amos Washburn was in command of a company in the American Revolution; one of his sons, a graduate of Harvard, was a talented lawyer at Middleboro; Edward Washburn, brother of Capt. Amos, was another patriot in the Continental army; and his son, Gen. Abiel Washburn, was one of the leading men of his time in Middleboro, the acknowledged leader of the Federal party, and for thirty-six years held commissions through the different grades of office in the State militia; while Luther, Cyrus and the late Bradford Sumner Washburn, in turn, were substantial citizens of the town, and the latter’s son, Judge Nathan Washburn, lawyer and present Justice of the Courts of Plymouth county, is giving a good account of himself.

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Journal of Rockingham County History and Genealogy 1976-1978

The Rockingham County Historical Society in Wentworth, NC, publishes the Journal of Rockingham County History and Genealogy twice a year, in April and October. This journal includes articles about the history and genealogical resources of Rockingham County, North Carolina, and the surrounding areas. The historical articles are of high quality and extensively researched. This book covers the first three years of publication, 1976-1978. A full index can be found at the end of each individual volume.

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Index to Articles found in the El Farol Newspaper 1905-1906

The Lincoln County New Mexico online archives contains pdf’s of all remaining copies of the El Farol Newspaper of Capitan NM, but doesn’t have an index to the newspaper. C. W. Barnum, an active member of AHGP, and state coordinator for the New Mexico AHGP recently invested his time and energy into providing an every person index to the various extant issues. He has shared this wonderful index with AccessGenealogy in hopes that it will reach a wider audience. Enjoy!

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Stephenson County Illinois World War 1 Veterans

This small booklet contains all the known men and women who participated in World War 1 and claimed their home of record as Stephenson County, Illinois. By participation, this record does not limit this to soldiers, but also contains the records of those men and women who served the Red Cross, Y.M.C.A., and other non-fighting positions. This book is free to read or download.

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Weymouth ways and Weymouth people

Edward Hunt’s “Weymouth ways and Weymouth people: Reminiscences” takes the reader back in Weymouth Massachusetts past to the 1830s through the 1880s as he provides glimpses into the people of the community. These reminiscences were mostly printed in the Weymouth Gazette and provide a fair example of early New England village life as it occurred in the mid 1800s. Of specific interest to the genealogist will be the Hunt material scattered throughout, but most specifically 286-295, and of course, those lucky enough to have had somebody “remembered” by Edward.

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Spokane Story

“Spokane Story: A Colorful Early History of the Capital City of the Inland Empire” by Lucile Foster Fargo offers readers an evocative journey through the formative years of Spokane, Washington. Published in 1957 by Northwestern Press in Minneapolis, this work seeks to straddle the realms of history and storytelling, presenting a narrative that is neither entirely factual history nor pure fiction. Fargo accepts the challenging task of depicting Spokane’s cultural and developmental evolution from its fur trade beginnings to its emergence as a municipal entity in the early twentieth century.

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