Surname: Vann

Biographical Sketch of D. W. Vann

(See Downing)-Daniel Webster, son of James and Elizabeth (Heaton) Vann was born October 12, 1845 in Cherokee Nation. Enlisted in Company M First Cherokee Mounted Volunteers, Confederate service July 12, 1862 and on reorganization in 1863 he joined company C the First Cherokee Mounted Rifles in which he served until the end of the war. He married Nancy Jane Riley, born Nov. 27, 1847. She died soon after their marriage and he married October 6, 1870 Clarinda Vann Rowe, born January 16, 1851. She died July 28, 1903. They were the parents of: Joseph Rowe, born June 1, 1871 and

Slave Narrative of Johnson Thompson

Person Interviewed: Johnson Thompson Place of Birth: Texas Date of Birth: December 1853 Just about two weeks before the coming of Christmas Day in 1853, I was born on a plantation somewheres eight miles east of Bellview, Rusk County, Texas. One year later my sister Phyllis was born on the same place and we been together pretty much of the time ever since, and I reckon there’s only one thing that could separate us slave born children. Mammy and pappy belong to W.P. Thompson, mixed-blood Cherokee Indian, but before that pappy had been owned by three different masters; one was

Slave Narrative of Lucinda Vann

Place of Birth: Webbers Falls, Oklahoma Age: 92-100+ Yes, Sa. My name’s Lucinda Vann, I’ve been married twice but, that don’t make no difference. Indians wouldn’t allow their slaves to take their husband’s name. Oh, Lord, no. I don’t know how old I is; some folks say I’se ninety-two and some say I must be a hundred. I’se born across the river in the plantation of old Jim Vann in Webbers Falls, I’se born right in my marster and missus bed. Yes I was. You see, I’se one of them sudden cases. My mother, Betsy Vann, worked in the big

Slave Narrative of Harriett Robinson

Person Interviewed: Harriet Robinson Location: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Bastrop, Texas Date of Birth: September 1, 1842 Age: 95 I was born close to Webbers Falls, in the Canadian District of the Cherokee Nation, in the same year that my pappy was blowed up and killed in the big boat accident that killed my old Master. I never did see my daddy excepting when I was a baby and I only know what my mammy told me about him. He come from across the water when he was a little boy, and was grown when old Master Joseph

Slave Narrative of Betty Robertson

Person Interviewed: Betty Robertson Location: Fort Gibson, Oklahoma Age: 93 I was born close to Webbers Falls, in the Canadian District of the Cherokee Nation, in the same year that my pappy was blowed up and killed in the big boat accident that killed my old Master. I never did see my daddy excepting when I was a baby and I only know what my mammy told me about him. He come from across the water when he was a little boy, and was grown when old Master Joseph Vann bought him, so he never did learn to talk much

Slave Narrative of Phyllis Petite

Person Interviewed: Phyllis Petite Location: Fort Gibson, Oklahoma Place of Birth: Rusk County, Texas Age: 83 I was born in Rusk County, Texas, on a plantation about eight miles east of Belleview. There wasn’t no town where I was born, but they had a church. My mammy and pappy belonged to a part Cherokee named W. P. Thompson when I was born. He had kinfolks in the Cherokee Nation, and we all moved up here to a place on Fourteen-Mile Creek close to where Hulbert now is. ‘way before I was big enough to remember anything. Then, so I been

Biography of Charles E. Vann

Charles E. Vann, one of the well known residents of Muskogee county, living at Webbers Falls, has long been identified with farming interests in this section of the state. He is a native son of Oklahoma, his birth having occurred near Preston, Texas, in Chickasaw Nation, on the 12th of November, 1863. He is a son of John S. and Elizabeth (Fields) Vann, both of whom were members of the Cherokee Nation. They had a family of five children, but Charles E. is the only one now living. In what is now Muskogee county Charles E. Vann spent the period

Brantley S. Vann

F. A., Btry. E, 9th Regt. Born in Cumberland County June 17, 1896; son of J. R. and Ida L. Vann. Entered the service at Fayetteville, N.C., July 28, 1918, and sent to Camp Jackson, S. C., transferred to Camp Hill, Va. Mustered out of the service at Camp Jackson, S. C., June 28, 1919.

Junius Richardson Vann, Jr.

Capt., Med. Corps, 160th Inf., 40th Div. Born in Cumberland County Sept. 9, 1889; son of J. R. and Ida L. Vann. Entered the service at Fayetteville, N.C., July, 1917, and sent to Camp Greenleaf, Ga., and transferred to Camp Mills. Sailed for France Aug. 11, 1918. Promoted to the rank of Lt. August, 1917, and to Capt. March 12, 1918. Landed in the USA July 29, 1919, and mustered out of the service at Camp Lee, Va., Aug. 15, 1919.

Walter Albert Vann

1st Class Private, Co. C, 83rd Div., 331st Inf.; of Duplin County; son of J. T. and Mrs. K. J. Vann. Entered service May 26, 1918, at Warsaw, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson, transferred to Camp Wadsworth, then to Newport News, Va. Sailed for France Sept. 23, 1918. Returned to USA March 8, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Jackson March 29, 1919.