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Weymouth ways and Weymouth people

Edward Hunt’s “Weymouth ways and Weymouth people: Reminiscences” takes the reader back in Weymouth Massachusetts past to the 1830s through the 1880s as he provides glimpses into the people of the community. These reminiscences were mostly printed in the Weymouth Gazette and provide a fair example of early New England village life as it occurred in the mid 1800s. Of specific interest to the genealogist will be the Hunt material scattered throughout, but most specifically 286-295, and of course, those lucky enough to have had somebody “remembered” by Edward.

Abstracts of Wills on File in the City of New York Surrogate’s Office 1660-1680

Abstracts of wills on file in the surrogate’s office city of New York 1660-1680. From May 1787 to the present, county surrogate’s courts have recorded probates. However, the court of probates and court of chancery handled estates of deceased persons who died in one county but who owned property in another. An 1823 law mandated that all probates come under the jurisdiction of the county surrogate’s courts. Each surrogate’s court has a comprehensive index to all probate records, including the unrecorded probate packets. Interestingly enough, there are wills existing and on record at the Surrogate’s Office in New York City for the time-span of 1660-1680. Genealogical extracts of these wills have been provided below.

Vigneron Family of Newport, Rhode Island

The Vigneron family to which Mr. Spare belongs in the maternal line is descended from Norbert Felician Vigneron, who was baptized June 6, 1670, in the town of LaVentie, Province of Artois, Diocese of Arras, in the French Netherlands. He was the son of Anthony and Anne Therese (de Beaussart) Vigneron. The date of his coming to this country is uncertain, but his marriage to Susanna Peirce, daughter of Joanna Peirce, of Newport, took place in Newport, R. I.

Abbe-Abbey Genealogy

The Abbe genealogy, as here published, is the consummation of Professor Cleveland Abbe’s life-long interest in the history of his family. Before reaching his twentieth year he began to collect items of interest about his ancestors and the collateral lines, and in spite of more or less interruption he has continued to do so all through his busy career. From time to time other members of the family added to the items collected by or worked up at the suggestion of Professor Abbe. A few years ago, finally realizing that other matters demanded too much time and that he could not arrange this material in final form, he turned over all his material to Josephine Genung Nichols. She has arranged the data in its present form, and added to it, as far as practicable, by extensive correspondence, library research and examinations of the public records at some of the former homes of the family.

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