Surname: Sparrow

Weymouth ways and Weymouth people

Weymouth ways and Weymouth people

Edward Hunt’s “Weymouth ways and Weymouth people: Reminiscences” takes the reader back in Weymouth Massachusetts past to the 1830s through the 1880s as he provides glimpses into the people of the community. These reminiscences were mostly printed in the Weymouth Gazette and provide a fair example of early New England village life as it occurred in the mid 1800s. Of specific interest to the genealogist will be the Hunt material scattered throughout, but most specifically 286-295, and of course, those lucky enough to have had somebody “remembered” by Edward.

Descendants of Nicholas Snow of Eastham, MA

Nicholas Snow, a native of England, came to this country in 1623 in the ship “Ann,” locating in Plymouth, where he had a share in the division of land in 1624. In 1634 he removed to Eastham, where he became a prominent citizen. His home was on the road from Plymouth to Eel river, on the Westerly side. He was admitted a freeman in 1633, and was elected town clerk at the first meeting of the town of Eastham, holding that office sixteen years. He was deputy to the General Court from 1648, three years; selectman from 1663, seven years. He and his son Mark signed the call to Rev. John Mayo to settle as their minister in 1655. He was one of Gov. Thomas Prence’s associates. He married at Plymouth, Constance, daughter of Stephen Hopkins, who came over in the “Mayflower.” Constance herself came in the “Mayflower.” She died in October, 1677. Mr. Snow died Nov. 15, 1676, in Eastham, Mass.

Atlantic Works

Miller Family of Middleboro MA

ABISHAI MILLER, than whom no man connected with the iron industry in New England stood higher in reputation for skill and efficiency in workmanship, and at the time of his death, Jan. 30, 1883, president of the Atlantic Works, which he had helped to organize and in the prosperity of which he had long been a vital factor, was born June 22, 1809, in Fall Brook, Middleboro, Mass., son of John and Susanna (Sparrow) Miller, and a member of a family which located in that town in the seventeenth century. John Miller, a native of England, born in 1624, was

1899 Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts Directory Cover

1899 Directory for Middleboro and Lakeville Massachusetts

Resident and business directory of Middleboro’ and Lakeville, Massachusetts, for 1899. Containing a complete resident, street and business directory, town officers, schools, societies, churches, post offices, notable events in American history, etc. Compiled and published by A. E. Foss & Co., Needham, Massachusetts. The following is an example of what you will find within the images of the directory: Sheedy John, laborer, bds. J. G. Norris’, 35 West Sheehan John B., grocery and variety store, 38 West, h. do. Sheehan Lizzie O., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main Sheehan Lucy G. B., bds. T. B. Sheehan’s, 16 East Main

Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont vol 1

Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

1867 Plymouth County Massachusetts Directory, Oil and Candle Manufacturers to Pump Makers

Oil and Candle Manufacturers  Judd L. S., Marion Organ Manufacturers Reynolds P., N. Bridgewater Marston A. B. Campello, Bridgewater Oysters and Refreshments (See Eating Houses) Nash J. E. Abington Douglas W. East Abington Gilman A. N., Bridgewater Fuller John, Bridgewater Hull J. C., Bridgewater Tripp B. F., Middleboro Union Saloon, Middleboro Grover R. B., No. Bridgewater Washburn and Richardson, No. Bridgewater Ballard S. D., Plymouth Dodge J. E., Plymouth Painters Carriage  Peirce Wm. M., Abington Ford B. F. East Abington Bates Asa, South Abington Hersey David A. Hingham Sprague Joseph T., Hingham Eldridge David, Kingston Boomer B. L., Middleboro Southworth Rodney E., Middleboro

Slave Narrative of Mom Jessie Sparrow

Interviewer: Annie Ruth Davis Person Interviewed: Jessie Sparrow Date of Interview: December 1937 Location: Marion, South Carolina Age: 83 “No, I ain’ cold. I settin in de sun. Miss Ida, she went by here just now en call at me bout de door been open en lettin dat cold wind blow in on my back wid all de fire gone out. I tell her, it ain’ botherin me none, I been settin out in de sun. Well, I don’ feel much to speak bout, child, but I knockin round somehow. Miss Ida, she bring me dis paper to study on.

Slave Narrative of Mom Jessie Sparrow

Interviewer: Annie Ruth Davis Person Interviewed: Jessie Sparrow Date of Interview: September 1937 Location: Marion, South Carolina Age: 83 “No, honey, dere ain’ not a soul live here but me. Man stay in dat other room dere just to be a little bit of company for me when night come. He ain’ not a speck of kin to me, not a speck. Oh, he pay me a little somethin, but it not much. Mostly, I does want him for protection like. Ain’ got but just dis one room for myself cause dat part out dere does be just like out

Slave Narrative of Mom Jessie Sparrow

Interviewer: Annie Ruth Davis Person Interviewed: Jessie Sparrow Date of Interview: May 1937 Location: Marion, South Carolina Age: 83 “I dunno, child, I don’ ‘member nuthin more den I tell yuh de udder time. Is yuh been to see Maggie Black yet? I dunno how old she, but I know she been here. No, child, Maggie ain’ dead. She lib right down dere next Bethel Church. She move ‘way from Miss Mullins house when Gus die. Coase I ain’ ne’er been in she house a’ter she move dere, but dey say she hab uh mighty restful place dere. Dat wha’

Slave Narrative of Mom Jessie Sparrow

Interviewer: Annie Ruth Davis Person Interviewed: Jessie Sparrow Date of Interview: May 1937 Location: Marion, South Carolina Age: 83 “Honey, my white folks been well-to-do peoples. Dey ain’ been no poor white trash. Dey hab ‘stonishing blood in dey vein. I been b’long to Massa Sam Stevenson wha’ lib right down dere ‘cross Ole Smith Swamp. Dey ain’ hab no chillun dey own, but dey is raise uh poor white girl dere, Betty. Dey gi’e (give) she eve’yt’ing she ha’e en dey school she too.” “De ole man, he mind ain’ been zactly right when he die. Dey say he