Surname: Sanger

1860 Free Inhabitants Creek Nation Page 1

1860 Census West of Arkansas – Creek Nation

Free Inhabitants in “The Creek Nation” in the County “West of the” State of “Akansas” enumerated on the “16th” day of “August” 1860. While the census lists “free inhabitants” it is obvious that the list contains names of Native Americans, both of the Creek and Seminole tribes, and probably others. The “free inhabitants” is likely indicative that the family had given up their rights as Indians in treaties previous to 1860, drifted away from the tribe, or were never fully integrated. The black (B) and mulatto (M) status may indicate only the fact of the color of their skin, or whether one had a white ancestors, they may still be Native American.

Biographical Sketch of J. M. Sanger

J. M. Sanger is manager of the Concordia Bottling Works. As this is a business which contributes to the larger commercial relations of Concordia and the surrounding territory, Mr. Sanger’s business position is accordingly one of influence and importance. The bottling works were established by E. J. Messal in 1884, and thus the business had a continuons history of more than thirty years. Subsequently a stock company took the management and ownership of the business, but in 1912 Mr. Sanger bought the plant from the stock company and is now its manager. He had made a thorough study of the

Biography of Marvin H. Sanger

Of Canterbury, the second son of Ebenezer and Eunice (Hutchins) Sanger, was born in the town of Brooklyn, Conn., April 12th, 1827. In the year 1828 his parents removed to Canterbury, which has since been his residence. His paternal grandfather was James Sanger, of Windsor, Hartford county, Connecticut, and his grandmother, Olive (Chaffee) San-ere Mr. James Sanger died in Windsor,. Some years after Mrs. Sanger returned to Canterbury, where she resided until her death at an advanced age. The children of this marriage were three sons, James, Ebenezer and Ira, and one daughter, Sally. Immediately after the death of his

Biographical Sketch of Lydia Sanger

ISAAC, JOHN, PHINEAS, LYDIA, ELIZABETH and PHEBE SANGER came to Croydon in 1770, and were regarded as an important accession to the town. The brothers had families, the sisters were unmarried. Their descendants are characterized by a great fondness for books and the remarkable facility with which they acquire literary and scientific knowledge. Very many of the distinguished sons of Croydon are proud to trace their lineage from the Sangers. John and Phineas left town. Isaac died of the heart disease, while crossing Croydon Mountain in 1780, leaving three daughters-one of whom married Barnabas Cooper, and another william Gibson. Lydia