Surname: Parks

Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont vol 1

Genealogical and Family History of Vermont

Hiram Charlton took on the publication of the Genealogical and Family History of the State of Vermont for Lewis Publishing. In it, he enlisted the assistance of living residents of the state in providing biographical and genealogical details about their family, and then he published all 1104 family histories in two distinct volumes.

Slave Narrative of Aunt Adeline

“I was born a slave about 1848, in Hickmon County, Tennessee,” said Aunt Adeline who lives as care taker in a house at 101 Rock Street, Fayetteville, Arkansas, which is owned by the Blakely-Hudgens estate. Aunt Adeline has been a slave and a servant in five generations of the Parks family. Her mother, Liza, with a group of five Negroes, was sold into slavery to John P.A. Parks, in Tennessee, about 1840. “When my mother’s master come to Arkansas about 1849, looking for a country residence, he bought what was known as the old Kidd place on the Old Wire

Biography of Jennie Taylor Parks

A Scotch girl married an Englishman named Charles Fox. Two sons were born of this union. In later years the parents were divorced. The father kept the eldest son, who according to the English law of primogeniture was to succeed to his titles and estate, but allowed his wife to keep Charles, the younger son who had no vested prospects and his mother added her maiden name to his, and thenceforward he was known as Charles Fox-Taylor. Charles Fox-Taylor married Jennie Walker, the granddaughter of the Ghigau, or Beloved Woman of the Cherokees. This was the supreme title and was

Biographical Sketch of Hon. R.A. Parks

Hon. R. A. Parks, editor of the Lynchburg Falcon and attorney at law, was born October 21, 1849, in Lynchburg. His father is Rufus B. Parks, whose sketch appears next above. His early life was spent with his parents and in school. He engaged in teaching school and studying law when a young man. In June 1872, he obtained license to practice law, and has ever since continued to do so, in the firm of Holman & Parks, from 1872 to 1884, and since then in the firm of Holman, Holman & Parks. He was united in marriage, November 14,

Biographical Sketch of Thomas H. Parks

Thomas H. Parks, of the firm of Parks, Taylor & Co., of Lynchburg, Tennessee, is a son of Ambrose Lee and Eleanor E. (Watts) Parks. The father was born in North Carolina. After his marriage he moved to Missouri, where he resided until 1846, and then came to Lynchburg, Tennessee, where he was engaged the wheelwright and wagon making business. Both parents died in 1850. Thomas H. was born in Missouri October 19, 1840, being but nine years old when his parents died. He made his home with an uncle in Alexander County, North Carolina, until seventeen years old. In

Biographical Sketch of Parks, Rufus B.

Rufus B. Parks, clerk and master of the Chancery Court of Moore County, Tennessee, is one of four children born to Allen W. and Fannie (Miller) Parks, natives of North Carolina, born in 1797 and 1802, respectively. They took up their abode permanently in Tennessee in 1826. The father was a farmer, merchant, and in latter days kept hotel, and was magistrate a number of years. He died November 18, 1884, and the mother January 6, 1877. Rufus B. was born May 5, 1827, near Lynchburg, and received a good practical education. For about four or five years after attaining

Biographical Sketch of Robert T. Parks

Robert T. Parks, a merchant of Lake County, is the son of John L. and Malinda (Crafton) Parks. Both of his parents were natives of middle Tennessee, where they were married. They soon after settled in Giles County and lived there until 1852, when they moved to Gibson County, and nine years later to what is now Lake County. They had thirteen children, six sons and seven daughters. They belonged to the Christian Church. In early life he was a teamster, but on coming to the western district gave his attention to farming. He died during the war and his

Biographical Sketch of William Parks

One of the oldest pioneers of Malheur County and a man of excellent capabilities, being possessed of practical ability and judgment, and a keen discrimination that have made him a very successful business man and one of the leaders in the realm of finance in this section, the subject of this article is abundantly worthy of recognition and especial mention among the prominent men of Malheur County and this portion of Oregon, being also a man of worth and personal virtues. Mr. Parks was born in Brooklyn, New York, on June 7, 1845, being the son of Abraham and Jane

Slave Narrative of Miss Adeline Blakeley

Interviewer: Mary D. Hudgins Person Interviewed: Miss Adeline Blakely Age: 87 Home: 101 Rock Street, Fayetteville, Arkansas “Honey, look in the bible to get the date when I was born. We want to have it just right. Yes, here’s the place, read it to me. July 10, 1850? Yes, I remember now, that’s what they’ve always told me. I wanted to be sure, though. I was born in Hickman County, Tenn. and was about a year when they brought me to Arkansas. My mother and her people had been bought by Mr. John P. Parks when they were just children—John

Biography of Mrs. Anna Parks

Mrs. Anna Parks, a native daughter of Oklahoma and a member of one of the old and prominent families of the state, is the owner of a valuable farm near Bartlesville and is a most capable business woman, displaying marked executive ability, foresight and enterprise in the management of her interests. She was born on the present site of Bartlesville, her parents being John and Jennie (Downing) Lovelady, the former a native of Germany, while the latter was born in Indian Territory and was of Cherokee extraction. In 1860 the maternal grandfather, Jesse Thompson, settled near the present location of